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-   -   The Wonder Years (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=108977)

KidA 4 April 2012 00:08

The Wonder Years
 
Is on Netflix Instant. I'm through season four. Don't know about you guys but I watched this show religiously in my teens - definitely captured a lot about growing up a boy in the 70s.

Just thought I'd mention it for those who remember.

jsmurphy 4 April 2012 00:14

Good show.
Some really poignant episodes.

Remember the one about Kevin's brother's friend who went to Vietnam after high school?

MPCOA 4 April 2012 00:37

Dan Lauria, the father was actually a Marine Corps Officer in Vietnam

Trig 4 April 2012 01:04

Good show. I remember watching it with my family growing up. The unmistakable song in the beginning and Winnie Cooper. Winnie Cooper was my first celeb crush. (I was around their age at the time.)
Thanks for posting.

Hoepoe 4 April 2012 01:41

1 Attachment(s)
Great show and yes, Winnie was hot for us youngsters at the time and is not too shabby now either!

DCH 4 April 2012 02:27

their chubby friend went to a local college in O.C. where I volunteered, and he became a campus cop after his "acting years".

KidA 4 April 2012 11:40

I think my generation was the last one to live like this (I was born in 1971). We lived outside, most of us had one parent at home and people who had two parents working would go over and play with them and be watched by a parent. Video games had just come out and they were a novelty, but we'd rather be outside. Using the phone was a privilege and kids didn't talk on the phone, it cost money. No one had computers.

We could go out for hours without someone worrying about us. If kids got in fights or hurt, no one thought they should sue someone else to get money. Paddlings happened in school for dire circumstances. You could drive a truck to high school with a rifle in the back window. There was a smoking section at school, but dipping in class would get you a whoopin in every class but shop.

When we weren't in school we had to find something to do. Even though cable TV was out there was a world outside to discover, not be presented to us in plastic boxes.

I graduated after the Wall came down but before Desert Storm and went into the Army. Soon after computers became more prevalent, we went and got scared of things, we started looking to lawyers and lawsuits - visits to the Dr and Dentist went up and couldn't be paid for out of pocket anymore, you needed insurance, Zero Tolerance came about, kids stopped playing outside. They started paying attention at younger and younger ages to celebrities and fashion models. Children turned into sarcastic cynics, and were applauded for it, for having the smart assed mouth of an adult. Kids went from "seen but not heard" to the focus of people trying to recapture their youth. They weren't children anymore but mini adults, and all of them geniuses, and can do no wrong. Rather than parents take the word of teachers, they take the word of children - children who are prepped and coddled and groomed to someday become rich little politicians/celebrities with great hair.

Yes I know every generation is better than the next, but I think people will recognize I'm right. Those of us born in the 70s are the last generation to have a certain naivete as kids, an innocence that has been lost with the 24 hour media cycle and computers so prevalent they're everywhere.

Cujo 4 April 2012 12:20

Spot on, KidA. You're a couple of years older than me (74), but I remember those days all too well.

I'm a "keeper of the flame", so to speak. The cartoons my kids watch are the Flintstones, the old Voltron, Scooby Doo, Pink Panther and Space Ghost to name a few. They are always outside, and rarely play the video game systems they have. They are aware of technology and are pretty familiar with it, but I shove 'em outside every chance I get.

I still believe there are neighborhoods out there that still live the way we lived when we were kids, but they're few and far in between...

Spinner 4 April 2012 18:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by MPCOA (Post 1058125576)
Dan Lauria, the father was actually a Marine Corps Officer in Vietnam

He worked that experience into a story line for the show, only he served in Korea for that episode.

The Wonder Years had a couple of good episodes that touched on Vietnam, one of the best regarding Winnie's older brother who was KIA.

A typical cool dude, like a lot of youth who served there, and he would always stick up for Kevin when Dwayne was beating on him. Toward the end of that episode they show Kevin looking toward Winnie's driveway and "seeing" her brother working on his car, and him and the car do a slow fade.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoepoe (Post 1058125586)
Great show and yes, Winnie was hot for us youngsters at the time and is not too shabby now either!

And unlike Barbie, she's good at math. ;)

Seriously, I think she has an advanced degree in mathematics and has written a book about it.

Hot Mess 4 April 2012 19:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsmurphy (Post 1058125569)
Good show.
Some really poignant episodes.

Remember the one about Kevin's brother's friend who went to Vietnam after high school?

Season 6 episode 1. I started watching it on Netflix at night when I cannot sleep.

WS-G 4 April 2012 19:57

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spinner (Post 1058125837)
Seriously, I think she has an advanced degree in mathematics and has written a book about it.

Danica McKellar. She's written several, with a motivational focus towards the secondary school crowd. An idle generation that one can't seem to get movitated into much of anything, IMO.

Caught several episodes here and there, but never could relate to it. I had averaged a mere four months in any single locale between birth and high school graduation, so something with a theme about growing up and coming of age in the same piece of mythical suburbia is not something that pertains to my own life experience. I.e.: not culturally relevant.

KidA 4 April 2012 20:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by WS-G (Post 1058125867)

Caught several episodes here and there, but never could relate to it. I had averaged a mere four months in any single locale between birth and high school graduation, so something with a theme about growing up and coming of age in the same piece of mythical suburbia is not something that pertains to my own life experience. I.e.: not culturally relevant.

I moved around a lot, too, which is why I think I liked it. It was fantasy land, like the Ice Moon of Hoth, or the Forest Moon of Endor - something to dream about.

Spinner 4 April 2012 20:36

I thought the father played by Dan Lauria was very realistic, compared to a lot of the characters you'd see on other shows.

Reminded me a little of my own dad, who could be pretty stern at times.

WS-G 4 April 2012 20:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spinner (Post 1058125882)
I thought the father played by Dan Lauria was very realistic, compared to a lot of the characters you'd see on other shows.

Reminded me a little of my own dad, who could be pretty stern at times.

Was anyone's father anything at all like Ward Cleaver???? :biggrin:

jsmurphy 4 April 2012 20:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spinner (Post 1058125837)
The Wonder Years had a couple of good episodes that touched on Vietnam, one of the best regarding Winnie's older brother who was KIA.

A typical cool dude, like a lot of youth who served there, and he would always stick up for Kevin when Dwayne was beating on him. Toward the end of that episode they show Kevin looking toward Winnie's driveway and "seeing" her brother working on his car, and him and the car do a slow fade.

Yep that was a really good one.

WS-G 4 April 2012 21:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spinner (Post 1058125837)
...mathematics and has written a book about it.

And I forgot to mention, co-authored this article as an undergraduate:

http://www.danicamckellar.com/math/percolation.pdf


(I only have a minor in mathematics myself....)

floydjones 4 April 2012 22:08

Best episode was in the first season when Arnold went to work with his dad to try to learn more about him. Had to call my dad right after (at 1201 AM) just to hear say hi.

tawS7 5 April 2012 19:46

Quote:

Originally Posted by KidA (Post 1058125693)
I think my generation was the last one to live like this .....

Could not agree more. Well said. I miss those days. Wish my kids could grow up under the same conditions.

Also had mad crush on Winnie. Hadn't seen her pic since then. Wow.

jtk317 5 April 2012 20:42

Well, I will say I grew up having no real phone time (and not caring about it), riding my bike or walking most places, and a pack of 8-10 of us would be out after school and all days on weekends and in the summer just goofing off, hiking, playing baseball, etc. Most of the tv I remember well was Tom and Jerry and Looney Tunes that would come on during what would've been lunch time (if we were home) and later at night after dinner. I wish I could let my daughter do half the things I was doing by her age but unfortunately the world does not seem like as safe a place, even if kids are in groups.

Ex-PH 5 April 2012 23:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by KidA (Post 1058125693)
I think my generation was the last one to live like this (I was born in 1971).

Yup. Right outside my front door was a huge park, and beyond that was open land that we ruled on our BMX bikes and dirt bikes. If it wasn't for the 5/805 freeway, I could have ridden my motorcycle from my garage, all the way to Torrey Pines beach. That all ended in the mid-80's when San Diego's population exploded, and housing had to be built to accommodate everyone.


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