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-   -   Question for any SF veterans (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=113227)

hcorea 5 December 2012 15:00

Question for any SF veterans
 
Good day,

Firstly I'd like to thank you for your service and the opportunity to converse with you all.

My question is simple- Looking back at your SF time and all it entailed, how did it truly impact who you are and what you now do?

I ask because I am preparing physically, mentally and emotionally to serve the next decade of my life sacrificing my very mind, body and soul for that beret. Not for pride, wealth or fun. But for strength. A strength gained through blood, sweat and tears.

I've now spent 4 years in the Army Reserves until I finally realized I am capable of serving in a far more demanding capacity. I am young, stupid and uniformed in the matters of war. Regardless, everyone starts at the bottom, which is why I must start somewhere- and soon. The opportunity to learn and grow through both the great suffering and great achievements that await me as a Special Forces operator are something I can't pass up.

And so I've been preparing for the last six months, and will continue to do so for the next 6 months. I've always striven to maximize my absolute potential as a solder and a person, scoring well above 300 on the PT tests, along with providing motivation in each and every duty assigned to me- always completing it to the highest expectations.

I ask this question as part of a simple request by my mother, before I begin the paperwork of transferring to active duty. She requested me to ask a soldier that had done what I wish to do for my own benefit- and so I'm here asking you fine gentlemen(I know of no other SF people in my area.)

I did search the forum beforehand, but results were scarce considering the complexity of the issue and question at hand.

Any comments or responses would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

ussfpa 5 December 2012 17:48

Hey Buddy-
While we can all appreciate your mom's desire to want to know what is going to happen to the psyche of her boy, your question simply isn't the right question.

I say this because the answer is really "nothing".

I am fairly confident speaking for much of the tabbed population here (long / short / others...) that our time in Special Forces didn't do anything to change us - it simply allowed us to serve, and indeed flourish, around like minded individuals. Individuals who, like us, were grossly under-challenged and quite dissatisfied with what the "Regular Army" had to offer.

This camaraderie and absolute integrity of the Community is what makes each of us better.

One last thing...
Easy on the whole "operator" bit...not a term generally used outside of the Hollywood scene.

Good luck in your ventures. Keep doing PT (to stay prepared), don't quit when you get to selection, follow instructions, and let us know how you do.

In the meantime. Read up while you are here. There is a tremendous amount of information available on these boards. And some darned fine folks too.

Tracy 5 December 2012 18:40

Pardon my bluntness, but your Mother does not figure into this. Your decision, your committment (sp).

We did not join Army Special Forces because it's different, we joined because we're different. As USSFPA pointed out, if you make it through selection, assessment and training you'll find yourself among like-minded Soldiers.

Good luck and read up while you're here on this site.

hcorea 6 December 2012 12:02

Many thanks for the replies.

I couldn't think of a better way to spend my time than serving in a physically and mentally challenging capacity with like-minded individuals.

I will most certainly continue to read. Thanks again.

MakoZeroSix 6 December 2012 16:02

1 Attachment(s)
Gene has some advice:

Serpent556 6 December 2012 20:46

Please, when you show up at McKall, tell the first Cadre member you see you want to be an Operator. Then brace for impact.

Tripod 6 December 2012 22:06

Quote:

Originally Posted by Serpent556 (Post 1058223274)
Please, when you show up at McKall, tell the first Cadre member you see you want to be an Operator. Then brace for impact.

If he tells you they don't need any more operators then tell him you'll settle for being a Snake Eater ... and you really do want to eat a fucking snake.

The Fat Guy 6 December 2012 22:52

I am 54 years old, I gave a marriage, a shit load of knee cartilage, had a broken hip, ruptured TM, dislocated shoulder, chronic sprained ankles, planters fasciaitis and a pinched nerve in my neck that to this day had me in and out of the hospital over the last week. I drowned and have degenerative arthritis from my feet to my neck. I have buried too many friends long before their time. Most have given more than me.

I would not have lived my life any other way.

MakoZeroSix 6 December 2012 22:56

Quote:

I am 54 years old, I gave a marriage, a shit load of knee cartilage, had a broken hip, ruptured TM, dislocated shoulder, chronic sprained ankles, planters fasciaitis and a pinched nerve in my neck that to this day had me in and out of the hospital over the last week. I drowned and have degenerative arthritis from my feet to my neck. I have buried too many friends long before their time. Most have given more than me.
Yeah, but what does your mom think about all that noise?

BOFH 6 December 2012 22:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Fat Guy (Post 1058223307)
I would not have lived my life any other way.


Well said, Sir!

Tracy 7 December 2012 00:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Fat Guy (Post 1058223307)
I am 54 years old, I gave a marriage, a shit load of knee cartilage, had a broken hip, ruptured TM, dislocated shoulder, chronic sprained ankles, planters fasciaitis and a pinched nerve in my neck that to this day had me in and out of the hospital over the last week...

Slacker... :tongue:

If it wasn't for our Band of Brothers, I wouldn't have my family today.

Guy 7 December 2012 01:27

Quote:

Originally Posted by MakoZeroSix (Post 1058223310)
Yeah, but what does your mom think about all that noise?

Mine has no idea, she just thinks I'm different from most folks.:biggrin:

Stay safe.

Old Dog New Trick 7 December 2012 01:31

Quote:

Originally Posted by hcorea (Post 1058223131)
Many thanks for the replies.

I couldn't think of a better way to spend my time than serving in a physically and mentally challenging capacity with like-minded individuals.

I will most certainly continue to read. Thanks again.

Wrongly worded! I can think of at least a hundred better reasons to spend my time than going through selection, the Q-Course, and serving on a team just to find a challenge: and nobody will think like you. In fact, I spent the first eight-years of my Army career doing time. Plenty of good people (Officers and NCOs all Vietnam Vets at the time) that I respected had been telling me about Special Forces since my first unit and why I belonged there. It took a failure to achieve something (Delta Selection) that finally opened my eyes and ears to who and what Special Forces was, and then I couldn't wait to see if I had the mettle to be one.

Here's a hint though. It's not all physical. Sure strength and stamina will get you two-thirds of the way, but mental fitness and the capacity to overcome that which seems impossible to achieve will get you to some obscure point on a map where you've just completed one step in the developmental process of life.

You don't find Special Forces, it finds you! After it has, the world seems like an oyster and you are its pearl!

Ask your mom if she likes her little boy, because if she does, she may not like the man you will become. The first time you get to dawn that Green Beret after graduation you will understand there are no obstacles in life that present a problem. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter...the skills are just a bonus.

I wouldn't trade the time I spent in my SF career for all the riches in the world. Every ache and pain in my body is a reminder of serving with the best damn bunch of brothers any man could wish to have, and at the end of the day the satisfaction that we made a difference in someone's life!

SF is a calling, can you hear it?

hcorea 8 December 2012 21:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old Dog New Trick (Post 1058223346)
Wrongly worded! I can think of at least a hundred better reasons to spend my time than going through selection, the Q-Course, and serving on a team just to find a challenge: and nobody will think like you. In fact, I spent the first eight-years of my Army career doing time. Plenty of good people (Officers and NCOs all Vietnam Vets at the time) that I respected had been telling me about Special Forces since my first unit and why I belonged there. It took a failure to achieve something (Delta Selection) that finally opened my eyes and ears to who and what Special Forces was, and then I couldn't wait to see if I had the mettle to be one.

Here's a hint though. It's not all physical. Sure strength and stamina will get you two-thirds of the way, but mental fitness and the capacity to overcome that which seems impossible to achieve will get you to some obscure point on a map where you've just completed one step in the developmental process of life.

You don't find Special Forces, it finds you! After it has, the world seems like an oyster and you are its pearl!

Ask your mom if she likes her little boy, because if she does, she may not like the man you will become. The first time you get to dawn that Green Beret after graduation you will understand there are no obstacles in life that present a problem. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter...the skills are just a bonus.

I wouldn't trade the time I spent in my SF career for all the riches in the world. Every ache and pain in my body is a reminder of serving with the best damn bunch of brothers any man could wish to have, and at the end of the day the satisfaction that we made a difference in someone's life!

SF is a calling, can you hear it?

I can hear it so loud it's blown out my eardrums.

Believe me, It's not about the challenge- that's only a bonus.

Truth is I've waited 21 years of my life to find what makes life truly worthwhile. And I found I'm done waiting, and finished talking. Actions speak far louder than any words. The time for action is now.

I'm not searching for the money, the skills, or the pride(I believe humility is an important virtue).
It's for the purpose.

A purpose I know will be found in "serving with the best damn bunch of brothers any man could wish to have, and at the end of the day the satisfaction that we made a difference in someone's life!" as you said.

I can think of no better meaning than serving and sacrificing for that which is far more important than myself.

That mental fitness and capacity you mentioned is something I strive for and truly live for every day of my life. The problem is these words and my beliefs are useless if I cannot harness it, or realize it, without confronting obstacles which challenge me, hell even nearly break me.

Obstacles which I have yet to confront nor I believe will confront in my current life as a civilian, reservist and student.

Thank you for your advice and your words, they were very enlightening.

MakoZeroSix 8 December 2012 23:20

Quote:

I can hear it so loud it's blown out my eardrums.

Believe me, It's not about the challenge- that's only a bonus.

Truth is I've waited 21 years of my life to find what makes life truly worthwhile. And I found I'm done waiting, and finished talking. Actions speak far louder than any words. The time for action is now.
Look kid, if you're being this melodramatic about it, odds are you're going to cry the first time you find yourself in a draw, rain cascading off of you, throwing your rucksack against a tangle of vines so thick that it flings it right back into your face. And then quit.

Emotion is your enemy. Forget all that bullshit you've ever read about war, the nobility, how it changes you, blah blah. Forget all the romantic notions about service, sacrifice, how you'll do anything to make it because it just means so much to you. All those words and feelings will run out on you faster than a Fayetteville whorebag the minute you get your ass handed to you at Selection. What you need is a cold and ruthless flame that burns like a discarded ember silently within your being, that absolutely will not be extinguished. It is not there because of any creed, it is not there for any particular reason, other than that is who you are and how far you are willing to go.

Remington Raider 9 December 2012 04:52

Mmm?
 
[QUOTEEmotion is your enemy. Forget all that bullshit you've ever read about war, the nobility, how it changes you, blah blah. Forget all the romantic notions about service, sacrifice, how you'll do anything to make it because it just means so much to you. All those words and feelings will run out on you faster than a Fayetteville whorebag the minute you get your ass handed to you at Selection. What you need is a cold and ruthless flame that burns like a discarded ember silently within your being, that absolutely will not be extinguished. It is not there because of any creed, it is not there for any particular reason, other than that is who you are and how far you are willing to go.[/QUOTE]

ETA: When I grow up I wana be MO6;)

The Fat Guy 9 December 2012 08:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by MakoZeroSix (Post 1058223310)
Yeah, but what does your mom think about all that noise?

She sent me off with a note excusing me from anything "unsafe"



















Fucker :p;)

Guy 9 December 2012 09:22

LOL...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MakoZeroSix (Post 1058223769)
Look kid, if you're being this melodramatic about it, odds are you're going to cry the first time you find yourself in a draw, rain cascading off of you, throwing your rucksack against a tangle of vines so thick that it flings it right back into your face. And then quit.

Emotion is your enemy. Forget all that bullshit you've ever read about war, the nobility, how it changes you, blah blah. Forget all the romantic notions about service, sacrifice, how you'll do anything to make it because it just means so much to you. All those words and feelings will run out on you faster than a Fayetteville whorebag the minute you get your ass handed to you at Selection. What you need is a cold and ruthless flame that burns like a discarded ember silently within your being, that absolutely will not be extinguished. It is not there because of any creed, it is not there for any particular reason, other than that is who you are and how far you are willing to go.

Bro,

Did you come in when they were still selling Hustler/spank-mags in the PX and we had strippers during lunch with a two(2) beer max?:biggrin:

Let that kid be sensitive, melodramtic and shit. If he wants too wear capri pants in his off time that's acceptable nowadays also.:o

Hell! I grew up in the suburbs in Long Island, NY and cried when those wait-a-minute vines snagged my ass however...I DID NOT FUCKING QUIT!:biggrin:

Stay safe.

gavin 9 December 2012 09:46

This is the best thread ever...

25Diver 10 December 2012 00:14

Mako, whats going on good buddy it your old classmate (desk partner) from school last year. I haven't been here in a long time but I have been reading your comments and they are hilarious. I would also add that selection is just the beginning, I remember last year when we kept Monster Energy in business on 2hrs of sleep a night!


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