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1RiserSlip 2 September 2018 06:06

Your Local History
 
Interestingly and probably unsupringly I live 5.5 miles from where I grew up.

My area was always un-incorporated and settled in the late 1700's. Post office officially opened in 1880. The early settlers run or killed off the Native Americans here. (Shawnee) Which I can prove, unlike Elizabeth Warren I have running in my veins. My mom, as well as I, got interested in our ancestry after watching the original "Roots" movie in the 70's. Yes, that one. Kunta Kinte, Fiddller, the whole deal.

My dad had died about 3 yrs prior. My mom was still searching to fill a void. I was her only & primary focus as "baby of the family" last at home. She never drove a lick in her life. No matter how likkered up the ole man got. He quit driving in his last 6 or 8 years.

Soooo, as soon as I was old enough to get my driving permit she got me a 62 Chevy Stepside. 235 inline 6. Gas to oil ratio was near 2 cycle mixture. Bad valve seals I think. 3 on the the tree. Nice looking truck though.

I ran her ass all over southern WV. Going to different County seats & Courthouses digging up old records. Finding old cemeteries, going through old family Bibles & journals then applying word of mouth hand me down through the generations history.

There were no computers. Except NASA then.

My maternal side was fairly easy. Traced it to German/Scottish immigrants like a majority of Appalachia. Some Irish. My grandpa claimed distant kin to the McCoy family of the famous fued a few Counties south. Which I would deny if true at all. There is McClanahan in my veins though. He was a distant relative of Pearl S. Buck, author most known for writing "The Good Earth". We have that documented as well. He also claimed to have met John Dillinger but he was in his crazy stage at that point. It got worse. In the 70's we just said "Grandpa is old and fucking crazy". Shit happened. We now know that was Alzheimer's disease.

My Dad's side was difficult. Only went about 2 generations before him. My area and toward the "other" Virginia...was widespread Civil War conflict. A lot of courthouses were burned down as well as the rest of the town. Records were lost & destroyed. My Shawnee came from his side as well as a little French. Add the Sidenstricker, German...and I'm 100% American Mutt.

I have no negro in me Guy, in case you were wondering.

Most interestingly to me is the Civil War history. Less than a mile from me is a large wide open set of rolling barren grassy hills. I'll post up some pics later. It encamped a 5000 man Union Army led by Gen. J. D. Cox. The area is known as Spy Rock. Google is your friend. It probably doesn't look much different today as back then except the oak trees lining the woodline are bigger.

Gen. Lee was temporarily Headquartered early in the war just east of Gen Cox but they never clashed. Gen. Lee got his famous horse "Traveller locally and Stonewall Jackson's mother is buried 10 miles from me. Droop Mountain Battleground is a quick 70 mile drive.

How the hell can you not like this place?

It must be miserable to live somewhere you don't want.

Share your local history. Consider OPSEC as it applies. I ain't skeered.

gavin 2 September 2018 10:26

I grew up on the West Coast, but lived most of my adult life in North Carolina. I've always liked being able to be connected to the history and past of the eastern US. While the West Coast certainly has a past, it is mostly unrecorded.

Oldpogue 2 September 2018 11:15

1 Riser Slip
You may be interested in reading "Autumn of the Black Snake:The Creation of the US Army and the Invasion that Opened the West" by William Hogeland. Black Snake was the Indian nickname for General Anthony Wayne and the book runs from Sinclairs Defeat to the Battle of Fallen Timbers. It covers the early days of George Washington surveying the Ohio Territory, the Indian Wars with many of the Eastern tribes up to the formation of a standing army under the command of General Anthony Wayne. It centers geographically around Ohio and what is now West Virginia.

IronCross 2 September 2018 16:08

My mother is deep into our family genealogy.

Her side of the family runs deep into the 1700s in Florida.

Involvement in running salt production during the War between the States was one topic she'd covered. I need to spend a week with her and really dig in.

Fascinating idea for a thread, 1RS. Really fantastic spot you've got there. Thanks for sharing.

B 2/75 2 September 2018 16:25

The Swannanoa River Valley of Western NC is pretty rich in history: Davy Crockett came through here as a widower, married a local widow (the Patton family, her father advised against the union, as he was beneath her station), combined families, and then he moved out to meet his fate at the Alamo.

Lots of other interesting stuff, including a little Civil War cavalry skirmish in the Swannanoa Gap.

Asheville area is pretty damn nice place to be. Having 37 local breweries with over 100 varieties doesn't hurt much, either ;)

TennesseeDave 2 September 2018 17:16

With the exception of military assignments, Iíve lived my entire life in Tennessee. Lots of civil war history, Davy Crockett, Andrew Jackson and Meriwether Lewis was living here when he died.

Jonesborough was founded in 1779 and is the stateís oldest town. They have an historic district that is worth checking out and they run an outdoor play in July that covers the early history of the area.

Steve40th 2 September 2018 17:21

2 Attachment(s)
My father did allot of research like you, by driving to local areas records, librarys, etc etc. He even got information of our family back to early 1600 to our first families coming over in early 1700's to the Colonys. One of my Great Grandmothers is buried in jamestown, va. They recently put a new head stone on the grave.
We have had a family member in every major war since revolutionary, a Colonel, to my service, ending in 2012.
Civil War was really interesting, as Dad found daily muster reports etc for my G Grandpa and his date of release as a prisoner of war/parole?

1RiserSlip 2 September 2018 19:45

2 Attachment(s)
Not only was I able to get a pic of the old Union Army camp but at a perfect time!

wildman43 2 September 2018 20:06

Just a few names, Alexander ENDSLEY 1840 Monroe county which became Blount Co. Tennessee, William P. Williams ARK. 1845, Hannah Wood. last names, Kincheloe, Smith, Leggett, NC. Rhea Ten, SC 1850, Oyler, Rogers, Rogers 1877 Ark.


What is interesting is how some names became. A family name fall into four general classes according to their origin. one of the classes comprises surnames derived from the given name of the father by adding a prefix denoting either "son of or diminutive (or the contraction s) ing, and kin Gaelic Mac John became Johnsons, etc.etc


When tracing the last name their can be lot of different spelling.

Just good luck on finding your history

1RiserSlip 2 September 2018 20:11

That hill above extends another click or so to Spy Rock. Roughly looking E slightly NE. Which is kinda weird because rainbows usually form to your W.

I don't know why? Something about the setting suns reflection or some shit.

Stephanie Abrams was explaining it on TWC once but I wasn't paying attention. I was looking at her tits.

1RiserSlip 2 September 2018 20:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve40th (Post 1058746161)
My father did allot of research like you, by driving to local areas records, librarys, etc etc. He even got information of our family back to early 1600 to our first families coming over in early 1700's to the Colonys. One of my Great Grandmothers is buried in jamestown, va. They recently put a new head stone on the grave.
We have had a family member in every major war since revolutionary, a Colonel, to my service, ending in 2012.
Civil War was really interesting, as Dad found daily muster reports etc for my G Grandpa and his date of release as a prisoner of war/parole?


Like a lot of families I had kin on both sides. One drove a Union ammo wagon in a combat trains. Found his old pay records. Several particular months listed pay then the next 1 or 2 said "AWOL". He apparently went home for the birth of a child and returned, which was common.

Another side there was someone in the Va. Cavalary. Not Jeb Stuart's. I would have to dig for the unit designation.

Steve40th 2 September 2018 21:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1RiserSlip (Post 1058746181)
Like a lot of families I had kin on both sides. One drove a Union ammo wagon in a combat trains. Found his old pay records. Several particular months listed pay then the next 1 or 2 said "AWOL". He apparently went home for the birth of a child and returned, which was common.

Another side there was someone in the Va. Cavalary. Not Jeb Stuart's. I would have to dig for the unit designation.

My G Grandpa did go awol for his brother. He took him home to bury him, then returned.. Interesting how AWOL and paroled were used back then..
I had no family up north. We started in VA 1700's, then went to TN, then to GA.

HighDragLowSpeed 2 September 2018 21:40

I found my birth family through an unintentional and completely random 3am internet search in 2009.

My birth family is French Canadian from upstate NY. In the mid 1800s, a direct descendant married his young bride and then went to Alaska to find gold. Funny thing is....he found it.

They are both listed in the Erie Canal records as owning multiple boats. He went on to own several companies (was also a director of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal company which I believe runs through Georgetown) and, after he passed away, his bride went on to invest in tug boats in NYC. She lived into her late 90s. The family clearly had money as we have unposed family snapshots including her on wooden tugboats and with my birth grandmother as a little kid in Brooklyn in the early 1900s.

Most photos of the time were posed and taken in studios. Personal cameras were rare. These are snapshots. There are probably 200-300 snapshots from the early 1900s through the 1930s. The best ones (to me) are of my birth grandmother's grandmother in her 90s. Way cool.

I also have a photo of my birth grandfather on Tinian Island in WWII dated the day before the Enola Gay flew its mission from there.

I love history in general but, when it's family, it's even cooler.

litepath 3 September 2018 12:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve40th (Post 1058746161)
My father did allot of research like you, by driving to local areas records, librarys, etc etc. He even got information of our family back to early 1600 to our first families coming over in early 1700's to the Colonys. One of my Great Grandmothers is buried in jamestown, va. They recently put a new head stone on the grave.
We have had a family member in every major war since revolutionary, a Colonel, to my service, ending in 2012.
Civil War was really interesting, as Dad found daily muster reports etc for my G Grandpa and his date of release as a prisoner of war/parole?

No. Discharged that date in Albany GA. Paroled= discharged ( & other terms). He was enlisted in Irwinville, GA.

Steve40th 3 September 2018 12:46

Quote:

Originally Posted by litepath (Post 1058746290)
No. Discharged that date in Albany GA. Paroled= discharged ( & other terms). He was enlisted in Irwinville, GA.

Thnx, I guess I misread the form talking of Prisoners of War in Talahassee, Fl in May of 65

wildman43 3 September 2018 13:52

If you have a Mormons Church near you call them an ask if have a records file area, that you can do family research on. The one I went to years ago had records all the way back before Columbus landed.

litepath 3 September 2018 13:57

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve40th (Post 1058746293)
Thnx, I guess I misread the form talking of Prisoners of War in Talahassee, Fl in May of 65

No. Looking at your paper attached above, Seems he became a POW by virtue of his Army surrendering to the Authorites on May 10th. Then was duly discharged from the CSA on that later date.

Comparing the two forms you have there. Both appear to be CSA in origin.

TennesseeDave 3 September 2018 14:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by wildman43 (Post 1058746305)
If you have a Mormons Church near you call them an ask if have a records file area, that you can do family research on. The one I went to years ago had records all the way back before Columbus landed.

My brother in law went to Salt Lake City last year to look through their Family History Library. Heís been several times and spends a week or two when he goes.

KW Driver 3 September 2018 15:50

my paternal line was easily traced through the Massachusetts/Plymouth Colony, and my grandfather had it traced back to the mid-1200s outside of York.

my maternal line has pretty deep roots in Texas from the 1850s, but mom hasn't been able to trace it back into Ireland.

I never felt the need to look hard at roots, and probably because my paternal line is well documented. I also feel closer to and happier with my maternal line.

Dino0311 3 September 2018 17:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by wildman43 (Post 1058746305)
If you have a Mormons Church near you call them an ask if have a records file area, that you can do family research on. The one I went to years ago had records all the way back before Columbus landed.

They actually maintain a website that is free to all, although some of the advanced features are reserved for members of the chruch.

www.familysearch.org


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