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-   -   Reloaders: Equipment list? (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=68689)

chokeu2 4 April 2007 11:10

Reloaders: Equipment list?
 
Ok, I bought a Hornady Lock-n-Load AP back in 2000 or 2001. But being that I'd nearly whiped out in a divorce, I sold off most of my lead throwing toys, and pretty much forgot that I had this reloader. This thing never got used, never even set up.

So.... I was going through some stuff in the basement and I came across my reloader! Very pleasant find indeed, but! I have no idea if I have everything that I need to get this thing going.

Even though I bought this thing new, there was little documentation that came with it. So I do not know what I have, nor do I know what I need.

Does anyone have an equipment list handy, that could be used as a check list?

Another option I may consider is simply selling this thing to someone who knows what the hell they are doing, and buying a Dillion 550 package from Brian Eno. IF thats the smart play... Anyone want a good deal on a Hornady Lock-n-Load thats a bit dusty, but never used?

HOLLiS 4 April 2007 11:21

Probably look at the contents of a reloading package, such as RCBS offers, it carries the basic stuff.

Problem with Dillon 550's, is that they are addictive. I use my single stage for case forming and "very small loads".

Beyond the basic set up, it really depends on the type of loading you will be doing.

Dillon has some really great extras, Power case trimmer, Auto primer tube loaders, etc.

Hard H2O 4 April 2007 11:23

This site might help:
The National Reloading Manufacturers Association

Are you new to reloading?

chokeu2 4 April 2007 11:41

Yep, new to reloading.
I've done a bit of google fu, but a lot of the info got confusing on precisely what I needed to just get going.

As far as calibers, .45, .40, .223 eventually. I'd guess that I need to cut my teeth on one caliber first and learn what the hell I'm doing.

Hard H2O 4 April 2007 11:55

Reloading made easy!

The basics:
1. Remove spent primer
2. Clean cases if needed (some clean before removing primer to avoid media in the primer pocket). I do not generally clean my cases.
3. Inspect cases
4. Clean primer pocket and trim case if needed
5. Lube case (some dies do not require lube)
6. Size case (some dies deprime and size in one operation)
7. Reprime
8. Measure and dump powder
9. Seat bullet
10. Crimp case if needed

LOCK-N-LOAD AP

Looks like you will not need much beyond components and maybe a set of dies. Powder, primers, bullets, and cases.

From a bit of googling on that unit it looks like it does pretty much everything for you. I would think you would use a decapping/resizing die that both punches out the spent primer and resizes the case. Did you buy dies when you originally purchased the unit? I would think with a progressive unit like that you would use carbide dies that do not require lube.

Here is the press I use:
http://www.leeprecision.com/graphics...t/reloader.jpg

KBAR-04 4 April 2007 11:55

First thing is a good reloading manual. Second is a scale of some sort. Everything else is gravy. You can spend literally 1000s on loading equipment, depending on your OCD level...

HOLLiS 4 April 2007 12:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by KBAR-04
First thing is a good reloading manual. Second is a scale of some sort. Everything else is gravy. You can spend literally 1000s on loading equipment, depending on your OCD level...


Most affirmative on the reloading manual. Also read the other manuals too. Like anything, there are things you just don't do or mix it can be deadly. If you know some who reloads you can ask them for help.

BUT of all things a manual. Problem with advice from people, you may not be told all you need to know, forget what you heard or learn their bad habits.

chokeu2 4 April 2007 12:06

H2O, thanks for the info. I guess I do have pretty much what I need. I suppose I was thinking that I needed some of the more accessory type of stuff like tumbler, scale, etc. Since I do have the majority of what I need, what about "must have" ancillary equipment? I have the space to do it right, and I'd rather not fuck around and do it half assed.

Kbar, I do have the Lee manual. Is there one that you recommend over that?

Hard H2O 4 April 2007 13:28

I agree on the manual. Every reloading manufacturer has a manual with recipes.

A scale is good for checking how much your powder your measure is throwing. With a progressive like you have you are going to be relying on the volume of the measure for the powder charge. The scale will verify your setting.

Some type of case trimmer might be needed.
I use this one:
LEE CASE TRIMMER
along with the chamfering tool.

A caliper will help you measure case length:
Caliper

There are also gauges for case length.

I assure you that sooner or later you will need one of these:
Pow'r Pull™ Bullet Puller

There are quite a few tools like trimming that you can buy as stand alone powered units or as hand tools. The hand tools are usually inexpensive and good for low volume guys like me. The powered models are more suited to higher volume shooters.

I have a scale but I do not reload much beyond factory duplication hunting loads so I do not push the pressure envelope. I use the Lee Powder Measure Kit for most of my reloading:
http://www.leeprecision.com/graphics...art/pmkits.jpg

Hard H2O 4 April 2007 13:34

Here is what I started with in .30-30:
Lee Loader

Along with one of these:
http://www.stanleytools.com/catalog_...web_detail.jpg

and primers, powder, bullets, cases and lube I was all set.

HOLLiS 4 April 2007 14:35

H20 has some good advice for starting out. I have been reloading for about 35 years. This is my set up. Sort of what it can lead too. Alot of it adds up to the type of reloading you want to do and how much you want to do.

http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k2...75/reload2.jpg

chokeu2 4 April 2007 16:07

I appreciate you guys condenscing all of that information for my short attention span sporting ass...

Hollis, that is one hell of a set up!!!!

I'll be happy just to be able to do .45, .40 and .223! You have a damn factory!

GreenMeany 5 4 April 2007 23:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOLLiS
H20 has some good advice for starting out. I have been reloading for about 35 years. This is my set up. Sort of what it can lead too. Alot of it adds up to the type of reloading you want to do and how much you want to do.

http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k2...75/reload2.jpg

Man you got it BAD!

Funny how "I just want to reload for my XXX" turns into that!:D

Nice set up, I'm green with envy!

glockcqc 5 April 2007 08:30

Choke,

I started reloading in 1994 and now have a set-up similar to hollis. I load 9mm, .40 and 10mm, for my Glock pistolas.

I didn't have a reloading "mentor", and that's what I recommend you find; someone @ the range that reloads to give you some pointers which is priceless.

Some other recommendations:

-Purchase a lazer-cast reloading manual (ie Oregon trail bullet company). Covers loads for lead bullets and poly coats, such as Precision and Master Blaster bullets. Great manual w/super accuate loads and cheap. Can also provide info on starting loads for plated bullets, such as Ranier, Montana Gold, etc.

-Go to the Blue Press (ie Dillon) website for prices on stuff.

It's all about having a good time w/out blowing yourself up. Though, the "P for Plenty" formula is not applicable.

Good shooting

chokeu2 5 April 2007 10:53

Thanks for that heads up. I ordered the manual. I think that I'll like the format of that book. The Lee manual that I have is a smallish hard back that is a bit cumbersome.

Nice to finally have a clear picture.

Sharky 5 April 2007 11:16

Quote:

Originally Posted by glockcqc
I didn't have a reloading "mentor", and that's what I recommend you find; someone @ the range that reloads to give you some pointers which is priceless.




Yep. That and a good reloading manual are your two best bets. Reloading is fun and not that hard after you learn WTF youre doing. Here's a couple of things to keep in your melon.

1. Max means exactly that. Maximum. (Ask Scotty)

2. Keeping your AO cleaned up is as important as any other part of reloading. Static electricity will kill you.

chokeu2 5 April 2007 11:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sharky
1. Max means exactly that. Maximum. (Ask Scotty)

2. Keeping your AO cleaned up is as important as any other part of reloading. Static electricity will kill you.


We need to hear this story of Scotty nearly killing Guy...

Good call on the static bit. Worth investing in an anti-static mat I'd suspect?

Hard H2O 5 April 2007 11:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sharky
Yep. That and a good reloading manual are your two best bets. Reloading is fun and not that hard after you learn WTF youre doing. Here's a couple of things to keep in your melon.

1. Max means exactly that. Maximum. (Ask Scotty)

2. Keeping your AO cleaned up is as important as any other part of reloading. Static electricity will kill you.

In my admitedly limited experience going for max loads and max velocity is not conducive to accuracy. Moderate loads seem to give me better accuracy. More speed usually equates to more powder and more money.

A clean area also contributes to organization and a methodical approach and thus a bit more safety. Double charging is not as much of an issue with a progressive or automatic type of press but when you are using a C-type press and dumping loads into cases one at a time.

HOLLiS 5 April 2007 12:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hard H2O
In my admitedly limited experience going for max loads and max velocity is not conducive to accuracy. Moderate loads seem to give me better accuracy. More speed usually equates to more powder and more money.

A clean area also contributes to organization and a methodical approach and thus a bit more safety. Double charging is not as much of an issue with a progressive or automatic type of press but when you are using a C-type press and dumping loads into cases one at a time.

There is a good book, Ken Water's Pet Loads.

There are the macho guys that need to prove they are a man and re-load at Max +. Or they buy the biggest shooter available. But they can hot hit the board side of a barn.

A chronometer is a necessity for building up loads. MV among some other indicators can let you know what the pressures are. MAX loads cost more and will cause your brass and firearms deteriorate faster.

Going below Minimum loads can and will cause excessive chamber pressures if you don't know what you are doing, such as using a filler.

Also be sure the load is proper for the firearm. Example 45/70 there are three loads. The group I, is for trap door springfields which has the weakest action. Group III is for Ruger No. 1, and is about 500 FPS shy of the 458 Win Mag.

a Group III load in a Group I firearms will disassemble the rifle and the shooter.

Also be sure of the cartridge you are reloading. example not all 8mm are the same. Bullet requirements can vary from .316 to .326 (if memory is right). the 8 mm that was used in the late 1800's bullet is smaller than the 8mm that follow, the case is the same.

Generally beginning re loaders do not load for exotic calibers, but that is changing. Rifles like the 88 Commission has gotten to become a collectible shooter.

For starting out, stick with the popular calibers, 9mm, 40 S@W, 45 ACP, etc, They are very standardized.

Also it good to know what other factors that can cause excessive chamber pressures and to know what your firearm will like or fall apart on.

Hard H2O 5 April 2007 14:00

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOLLiS
There are the macho guys that need to prove they are a man and re-load at Max +. Or they buy the biggest shooter available. But they can hot hit the board side of a barn.

A chronometer is a necessity for building up loads. MV among some other indicators can let you know what the pressures are. MAX loads cost more and will cause your brass and firearms deteriorate faster.

Going below Minimum loads can and will cause excessive chamber pressures if you don't know what you are doing, such as using a filler.

I am more of a practical kind of shooter. While I enjoy reading and hearing stories of the latest and greatest or fondling some fine gun porn my .30-30 usually does the trick for what I need it to do. That said I see nothing wrong with hot rodding a firearm if that is how you get your kicks. I have done some kinda fun but tame stuff with the old lever gun. Lead roundballs, lead bullets... My brass tends to last a long time.

Reloading doesn't necessarily save you money. It more often allows you to shoot more for your money, extend the life of firearms chambered in esoteric calibers, and it leads to a whole other hobby that can take on a life of it's own.


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