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-   -   What are you reading? (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=40592)

Streck-Fu 8 July 2019 14:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by 8822 (Post 1058799327)
Currently reading Surprise, Kill, Vanish: The Secret History of CIA Paramilitary Armies, Operators and Assassins by Annie Jacobson.

Many interviews with Billy Waugh provide much of the body of this book. I am finding it to be quite average and the writing style is plodding in spots.

I am going to check it out from the library and give it a try.

hawkdrver 10 July 2019 01:56

Thanks a lot Mr.Kibblewhite, by Roger Daltrey.

Bought it on a whim, not sure what I was expecting but it was excellent. And I'm not a particular fan of the Who. Great dry humor throughout, well worth the read.

cj 14 July 2019 17:04

Rick Atkinson, "The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777 (The Revolution Trilogy, Book 1)."

I'm doing an audio version. It's typical Atkinson style, which I happen to enjoy. His description of the Battle of Bunker Hill (Breeds) is top-notch writing. He did a great deal of research for this book and is prominently on display with facts and descriptions (scenes and personalities) that I've never read in my nearly 50-years on this topic.

Purple36 14 July 2019 17:32

The Listener, by Taylor Caldwell

Changed my life story after reading it.

Armitage12 31 July 2019 20:55

Two books finished:
Doug Peacock, Walking It Off: A Veteran's Chronicle of War and Wilderness
and
Mike Peshmerganor, Blood Makes the Grass Grow.

Peacock's may be familiar to some of you. He was friends with Ed Abbey, a writer and prominent environmental activist who inspired the Earth First! group through his writing about Hayduke, a fictitious returning Vietnam War vet who was problematic. Hayduke was Peacock, suitably fictionalized. Peacock has written his own works about the west and his struggles. Reading it opened up a new set of things I was not aware of (I didn't know of Abbey, and I am much less familiar with the geography of the West though I've been in southeastern Utah/Escalante, which he discusses). I also "saw" several board members in the writing (especially the fuck you I'm going to go live on a mountain in the woods because people are dumb variety :biggrin: ). I'm working my way through Magician's Revelation: A Screed on Dreams for the second time, and caught a great many parallels between the two works (the connections between this world and other worlds, the significance of death and forces beyond this world, life force, and other things that I am not really doing justice to in this review).

Mike Peshmerganor's book I wanted to get as I'd followed his Instagram account. He is very blunt about how he got to be with the Peshmerga, and clarified things that I couldn't really get from the Instagram account. He served in the Norwegian Army, so he had training, but he clarifies why he felt that staying with the Norwegian Army was not the way to solve his dilemma--and he's quite blunt about the Norwegian foreign policy shortcomings on the Near East. He is charitable when discussing the unit he joins, but makes it clear he was much more capable in many ways than them (operations of weapons systems and first aid, for example). He explains the arrival of PeshmergaSwe (an 18 year old with zero military experience, but courage), and the connection between them. He also explains his emotions and feelings as he processed what he was going through, and is pretty honest (or comes across as being honest). It adds to our understanding of the ISIS fight, but it is a snapshot/thin slice of one area at one short time (about two years total, from decision to go to return to Norway). It left me wondering about how much we really do understand the expatriate/refugee networks that exist in this world. He was a child of Iraq, as his family fled and Norway took them in, but he considered himself Norwegian of Kurdish extraction. We know this has happened much before: Albanians from New York going back to fight in the Kosovar forces, for example, or the thousands upon thousands of Italians who returned from the Western Hemisphere in 1915 when Italy joined the war. Their homeland called them. But Mike sees himself as both loyal to his ancestral home (he needed to fight to stop the horror) and his true home of Norway. A fascinating tale, comparatively quick to read, and something that I don't want the historical community to overlook or miss.

The Fat Guy 5 August 2019 09:48

Here is a good book from a friend and colleague. He just won an award for best military Book. "The Consultant". Take a read of it and let me know what you think.

GPC 7 August 2019 15:51

Jack Carr's newest, True Believer.

TX teacher 8 August 2019 21:50

I'm now on to "Roanoke: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Colony" by Lee Miller.

It's obviously about the initial Roanoke settlement (actually 3 trips were made) and what happened to the people. Clearly we still don't know exactly what happened, and what we do know isn't clear, but the author presents several theories that make good sense. I'm not normally into this kind of history, but my wife really liked it and recommended it to me. I haven't been disappointed so far.

Mars 8 August 2019 22:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by TX teacher (Post 1058809407)
I'm now on to "Roanoke: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Colony" by Lee Miller.

It's obviously about the initial Roanoke settlement (actually 3 trips were made) and what happened to the people. Clearly we still don't know exactly what happened, and what we do know isn't clear, but the author presents several theories that make good sense. I'm not normally into this kind of history, but my wife really liked it and recommended it to me. I haven't been disappointed so far.

I'm glad you posted this. I was just this week looking at books related to Roanoke. This gives me somewhere to begin looking.

hawkdrver 9 August 2019 02:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by Armitage12 (Post 1058807842)
Two books finished:
Doug Peacock, Walking It Off: A Veteran's Chronicle of War and Wilderness

That's a great book, as is Grizzly Years.

GPC 9 August 2019 20:53

The NH State Constitution.

Xenonburnout 10 August 2019 11:46

Just finished The Looming Tower by Lawrence Wright. A good read about the earliest days of Bin Laden up to 9/11. I recommend it. Starting to read The Secret War with Iran by Romeo Bergman.
Both were recommended by members here.

DaveP 12 August 2019 08:33

Keith's Rifles for Large Game.
Elmer Keith, 1946.

Up last night with a strained back, couldn't sleep, dug through my shelves and found this hardcover bought last winter at a bookstore's closing sale.
Good storytelling, interesting to see the lineage of calibers and the breadth of travel he and his contributors put in.

DaveP

FinsUp 16 August 2019 12:54

Rereading Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. I had read it years ago and found a copy at a used book store.

cj 16 August 2019 13:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by cj (Post 1058804955)
Rick Atkinson, "The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777 (The Revolution Trilogy, Book 1)."

I'm doing an audio version. It's typical Atkinson style, which I happen to enjoy. His description of the Battle of Bunker Hill (Breeds) is top-notch writing. He did a great deal of research for this book and is prominently on display with facts and descriptions (scenes and personalities) that I've never read in my nearly 50-years on this topic.

Finished this yesterday. I give it a 9.5 out of 10. This is one of Atkinson's best written and researched books. I can't wait for the rest of the trilogy. He ends this book in 1777 so it includes the Massachusetts campaign (battles for Bunker Hill and siege of Boston), Canada campaign (battles for Montreal and Quebec), New York (battles for Long Island, Manhattan, and White Plains) campaign, South Carolina campaign (battles for Charlestown and Sullivan's Island), and the New Jersey campaign (battles of Trenton and Princetown). He covered both sides to include King George. The writing was masterful in its descriptions of each character. He did an astonishing amount of research for this book and it definitely showed. Since I did the audio book, you may get a different perspective if you read it, but, I recommend everyone to read/listen to it because you will learn a lot, including quite a bit about Ben Franklin.

For example, before this book, I didn't know that Franklin actually traveled up to consult with the Generals during the Canada campaign. And that he in fact advised the Generals to incorporate archers into the ranks in order to increase the volume of fire. Franklin was a stud and physically brave. For example, on his way to France on a diplomatic mission to get France's support for the cause, he authorized the ship's captain to board and seize multiple British trading vessels, which effectively paid for his trip. Or that he personally met with British Commanding General Howe off of Perth Amboy on a British vessel to discuss possible terms of surrender (after the fall of New York), but, Franklin basically told him to pound sand in a very Franklin way. Also, how many folks knew that US Army "Rangers" were used in Manhattan at the Battle of Fort Washington, which is near the current George Washington Bridge? Or that more than 50% of all US POWs died while in captivity, with some of the conditions of confinement on the scale of Andersonville in terms of severity?

Kip 17 August 2019 18:58

I'm in the middle of the latest Jack Carr novel. His first novel, The Terminal List, was pretty good.

Not sure how I feel about this one yet. It's...interesting.

GPC 18 August 2019 08:40

The Bracken Collection Essays and short fiction 2010 to 2019 by Matthew Bracken.

I also recommend his novel Enemies Foreign and Domestic.

Kip 19 August 2019 21:12

Quote:

Originally Posted by GPC (Post 1058811050)
I also recommend his novel Enemies Foreign and Domestic.

This might be my next read. I've had it on my Kindle for forever. I think I got it free.

I might have some of his other works, too, but I figured they were all novel length; no?

GPC 19 August 2019 21:25

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kip (Post 1058811267)
This might be my next read. I've had it on my Kindle for forever. I think I got it free.

I might have some of his other works, too, but I figured they were all novel length; no?

Yes, the one I'm reading is a combination of non-fiction essays and fiction short stories. He has added notes for 2019 and updated it. I have read all his novels and really like them.

hawkdrver 19 August 2019 21:33

Quote:

Originally Posted by FinsUp (Post 1058810832)
Rereading Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. I had read it years ago and found a copy at a used book store.

As a pilot I’m biased, but this is a must read no matter who you are, especially in this crowd.

The English translation is so wonderful that I’ve often wished I could read it in the original French.


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