SOCNET: The Special Operations Community Network

SOCNET: The Special Operations Community Network (http://www.socnet.com/index.php)
-   Book Reviews (http://www.socnet.com/forumdisplay.php?f=226)
-   -   What are you reading? (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=40592)

Certa Cito 25 December 2010 17:01

After reading about it here, I think I've got House to House waiting for me as a Christmas present from Mrs CC when I finally get home, knowing my luck though, she'll have bought the wrong book, and it's actually a book about fixing up shithole houses by the 'House Doctor', whatever her name is.

arizonaguide 25 December 2010 22:59

Starting Dalton Fury's book.

jrgong 25 December 2010 23:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by arizonaguide (Post 1057939743)
Starting Dalton Fury's book.

Great book.

Soot 25 December 2010 23:32

Bill Bryson

At Home

Just started it.

About what you'd expect from Bill Bryson.

I don't think I'ver ever read anything from him that I didn't like.

Bearcat06 26 December 2010 08:17

Just picked up Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand.

arizonaguide 27 December 2010 13:32

Halfway through Dalton Fury's book. Great so far, and I really like all the footnotes, many of which are links to other recommended books. My reading list just grew by a few more books. A little s-l-o-w going for me because the damn type seems smaller than normal though. Time to upgrade to the damn 1.5x's
:cool:

GPC 27 December 2010 14:52

Going to give War and Peace a shot.Always wanted to tackle it.

arizonaguide 28 December 2010 14:09

Dalton Fury's book was outstanding. VERY detailed and educational, and full of supporting references. It really hit's home the issues in Afghanistan and the difficulties working with indigenous politics and cultures. It also really reminded me of another war where politics sadly forced us to leave the "back door" open for our enemy.
Great read.

Next on the list of my Christmas Holiday read-a-thon...a step back in time:

"Phoenix, and the Birds of Prey - Moyer" :cool:

and "Practical Shooting - Enos" thrown on top for mental breaks/waiting for the wife in the car later while she does her after-Christmas BS. :biggrin:

SGTROCK 3 January 2011 14:21

Assholes Finish First by Tucker Max

Rock

ET1/ss nuke 3 January 2011 21:47

Quote:

Originally Posted by GPC (Post 1057940152)
Going to give War and Peace a shot.Always wanted to tackle it.

You might want to try the 1950s film adaptation with Henry Fonda and Audrey Hepburn as a starter. The film leaves a lot out but is vaguely faithful to the plot, though arguably Tolstoy wove the whole plot as an excuse for filling up the intervening thousand pages or so with moralistic preaching about the characters' choices. If you like the film, dive into the book. If you wind up liking the book, try Aleksander Solzhenitsyn's "August 1914," which was designed to duplicate Tolstoy's Napoleonic tale in a WW1 setting and was the first entry in a panoramic trilogy about the Russian Revolution.

theWookie 3 January 2011 21:56

The Best of Brain Droppings by George Carlin. :biggrin:

TX teacher 3 January 2011 23:41

I'm just about finished on the research portion of a paper I'm working on so I thought I'd take a little time to start on George W Bush's "Decision Points" that my wife gave me for Christmas. I'm only a chapter in, but it's a good read so far.

GPC 6 January 2011 10:28

Quote:

Originally Posted by ET1/ss nuke (Post 1057942513)
You might want to try the 1950s film adaptation with Henry Fonda and Audrey Hepburn as a starter. The film leaves a lot out but is vaguely faithful to the plot, though arguably Tolstoy wove the whole plot as an excuse for filling up the intervening thousand pages or so with moralistic preaching about the characters' choices. If you like the film, dive into the book. If you wind up liking the book, try Aleksander Solzhenitsyn's "August 1914," which was designed to duplicate Tolstoy's Napoleonic tale in a WW1 setting and was the first entry in a panoramic trilogy about the Russian Revolution.

Thank you might check it out.

Crispy 6 January 2011 12:36

Currently reading "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. Just finished "the Fountainhead" by same and figured it was a good follow through. I recently found out that my oldest client(as in biz relationship) is with a gentleman who was friends/mentored by one of her inner circle. So thats how I came to find out about her.

Last couple months of reading were -

"Day by Day Armageddon" and "Day by Day Armageddon, Beyond Exile" by JL Bourne, whom is a currently serving active duty. EXCELLENT zombie books!

"The Stand" by Stephen King.

And the full graphic novel(ie comic books) series "The Walking Dead". Saw the show on AE and rushed over to amazon to buy the full lot in one checkout. Well worth it.

10thvet 6 January 2011 13:25

A "higher form of killing" by Robert Harris and Jeremy Paxman.

This book will open your eyes to the history and dangers of "modern" chemical warefare. It is mind blowing the numbers of WIA/KIA due to chemicals in WWI.

Oldpogue 6 January 2011 15:09

Quote:

Originally Posted by ET1/ss nuke (Post 1057942513)
If you wind up liking the book, try Aleksander Solzhenitsyn's "August 1914," which was designed to duplicate Tolstoy's Napoleonic tale in a WW1 setting and was the first entry in a panoramic trilogy about the Russian Revolution.

I found that much more readable than "War and Peace". Good description of the Battle of Tannenburg. I found the second book in the trilogy to be tedious and I don't think Solzhenitsyn ever got the third book written.

Keegah 6 January 2011 15:50

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10thvet (Post 1057943401)
A "higher form of killing" by Robert Harris and Jeremy Paxman.

This book will open your eyes to the history and dangers of "modern" chemical warefare. It is mind blowing the numbers of WIA/KIA due to chemicals in WWI.

A good follow-up might be Biohazard by Ken Alibek. It concerns the Soviets' experiments with biochemical warfare, focusing on weaponized anthrax and tularemia. I never got around to finishing it, but Alibek used to head one of the departments in the program and was one of the most important scientists the Soviets had working on it. He's not talking out of his ass. Very interesting and very informative, not to mention scary when you wonder where all that their weaponized reserves went to after the dissolution.

PAandWRITER 6 January 2011 16:32

"Sh*t My Dad Says" by Justin Halpern, recounting the sage advice of his 73-yr-old dad, Sam.

Maxim described it as, "shoot-beer-out-your-nose funny." And I agree.

Most recent gem . . . "Sometimes life leaves a hundred dollar bill on your dresser, and you don't realize until later it's because it fucked you."

arizonaguide 6 January 2011 19:44

Quote:

Originally Posted by PAandWRITER (Post 1057943464)
"Sh*t My Dad Says" by Justin Halpern, recounting the sage advice of his 73-yr-old dad, Sam.

Adding that one to my list! :cool: Just to have a few new ones to throw back at MY Dad.

Bettendorf 8 January 2011 20:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phixer56 (Post 1057924935)
My most recent include "To Kill Binladen" and "Shadow Divers".

Awesome book. I just finished "Titanic's Last Secrets" last night. Not as exciting as "Shadow Divers, that's for sure but enjoyable. It's about John Chatterton and Richie Kohler's trip out to the wreck of Titanic and finding proof about just how it sank. It did not happen like it shows in Hollywoods movie. Also, it discusses the shipyard and the folks who put the ship together.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 15:13.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Socnet.com All Rights Reserved