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-   -   What are you reading? (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=40592)

GPC 24 April 2013 15:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by glenne (Post 1058269118)
The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth - Mark Mazzetti (Author)
A Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter’s riveting account of the transformation of the CIA and America’s special operations forces into man-hunting and killing machines in the world’s dark spaces: the new American way of war.

Pretty interesting so far. Pissing contest between Rumsfeld & Tenet over
Both intelligence gathering and para-military operations.
JSOC, etc.

I getting ready to start it.

CAP MARINE 24 April 2013 20:41

Voices of the Pacific

jtk317 26 April 2013 15:43

Still on the "Twilight War" but finished "Wayne of Gotham" (not bad but not great overall) and started another book alongside the first. Got my preorder copy of a book by the guy that does mobilityWOD. It's called "Becoming a Supple Leopard". F'ing bizarre title but does alot for clearing up the things that didn't entirely make sense to me in his WOD video posts. Also helps with picking up terminology he uses in the videos.

tartay 27 April 2013 04:06

I'm currently reading The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and The Toyota Production System as well. Boring I know, but pretty impressive stuff in 'em if you're interested in leadership and process improvement.

jasonglh 30 April 2013 06:06

Rangers in Korea

13F/COLT 30 April 2013 08:39

Quote:

Originally Posted by tartay (Post 1058274376)
I'm currently reading The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and The Toyota Production System as well. Boring I know, but pretty impressive stuff in 'em if you're interested in leadership and process improvement.

Great books, read them both. My family owns a couple body shops and it helped with implementing some of the "Lean" practices.

GPC 2 May 2013 10:07

The Carlyle Deception by Andrew M Williams.

Bearcat06 8 May 2013 05:21

Just starting: Escape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West by Blaine Harden

UncleTx 9 May 2013 21:02

Just finishing Battle: The Story of the Bulge by James Toland.

about to start Five Years To Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW by James N. Rowe.

UncleTx 9 May 2013 21:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by UncleTx (Post 1058278700)
Just finishing Battle: The Story of the Bulge by James Toland.
.

edit... John Toland.

CPTAUSRET 9 May 2013 21:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by UncleTx;

about to start [I
Five Years To Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW [/I]by James N. Rowe.

That is one great book!

WS-G 10 May 2013 19:59

Re-reading another famous physician autobiography: the late Dr. Christiaan Barnard's Een Lewe (lit. "One Life"). My copy is a first edition.

GracieLou 12 May 2013 09:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Fat Guy (Post 1058264162)
I read "The Only thing worth dying for". It was a good book until I learned how a friend was actually killed. Kind of a fucked up way to learn about such things. Still, a good read.

I just finished this one and it was a sad turn of events for that ODA. I also found it to be a good read, otherwise, and an insightful look (for my non-SF self) into the early days of the war in Afghanistan and the important role that SF played.

GPC 12 May 2013 16:04

Dirty Wars by Jeremy Scahill, very biased.

Baildog 18 May 2013 22:34

Just started The Guns at Last Light, by Rick Atkinson, the last book of his Liberation trilogy. Had read An Army at Dawn back when it came out, just read The Day of Battle a few weeks ago. All 3 are very readable and engrossing, and threw out a few things I did not know (for example, how prepared we were and close we came to using gas in WWII).


Also reread 30 Seconds Over Tokyo recently, which I hadn't read since about 5th grade, when it was my favourite book.

Bearcat06 19 May 2013 01:23

Re-reading: In Broad Daylight: A Murder in Skidmore, Missouri by Harry N. MacLean.

He also has a follow-up to the original book called:

The Story Behind "In Broad Daylight" that is on Kindle only for 3-4 bucks..... He published it Jan of this year.

coolshock1 20 May 2013 15:27

Outlaw Platoon. The first 90 pages had me on a roll of putting it down and picking it back up. Now I can't put it down. Some moving parts in this book.

Hot Mess 25 May 2013 17:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtk317 (Post 1058274187)
Still on the "Twilight War" but finished "Wayne of Gotham" (not bad but not great overall) and started another book alongside the first. Got my preorder copy of a book by the guy that does mobilityWOD. It's called "Becoming a Supple Leopard". F'ing bizarre title but does alot for clearing up the things that didn't entirely make sense to me in his WOD video posts. Also helps with picking up terminology he uses in the videos.

Twilight War was pretty informative and comprehensive IMO.

A buddy let me borrow Supple Leopard and I had to splurge for my own copy:redface: Lots of great information and a great reference when you get a new ache or pain. I highly recommend it, especially for people who don't want to waste the time or money to go see a doc or a PT when you can just fix yourself at home:cool:

jtk317 26 May 2013 20:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hot Mess (Post 1058284397)
Twilight War was pretty informative and comprehensive IMO.

A buddy let me borrow Supple Leopard and I had to splurge for my own copy:redface: Lots of great information and a great reference when you get a new ache or pain. I highly recommend it, especially for people who don't want to waste the time or money to go see a doc or a PT when you can just fix yourself at home:cool:

That's exactly why I got into the MWod stuff. Starett seems to really know his stuff. I'm picking up some inner tubes to use in lieu of the voodoo bands for the time being. Lacrosse balls are evil but have good effect. :biggrin:

GPC 1 June 2013 09:47

Starting American Warrior by Gary O'Neal.

GracieLou 5 June 2013 21:06

Ender's Game (3rd time), Ender in Exile, and Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card

Headshot 5 June 2013 22:41

I'm reading "The Artist's Way"; it is a great book aimed at removing creative blocks, no matter what your area of expertise is. It has exercises to help remove those mental blocks and open your mind to a more creative process. One of the exercises is to write in a morning log 3 pages of whatever comes to mind, no matter how nonsensical it all may seem; it really helps remove much of the daily fog that stands in the way of moving on with things that need to be done.

So far I highly recommend it for everyone.

Greentea 10 June 2013 16:59

Just read the Kindle Edition] of Warrior Princess: A U.S. Navy SEAL's Journey to Coming out Transgender. Early life and outstanding military service could have been a great story on it's own. Unfortunately, this was clearly written quickly, and suffers from some lax editing. I hope she finds peace and happiness in her journey.

MakoZeroSix 10 June 2013 20:18

I'll tell you what I'm NOT reading any more- Dan Brown's "Inferno". What a piece of garbage. I nearly smashed my Kindle not even a third of the way through. The guy doesn't even try anymore. Plus he sucks as a writer anyway- I just used to like the subjects he wrote about.

GirlwithaGlock 11 June 2013 08:15

^Thanks for that, M06. You just saved me some money - I was tempted to pick up that book. That bad, huh?

UncleTx 11 June 2013 18:59

Lost in Shangri-La: A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II by Mitchell Zuckoff. Great book. Read it in two short sittings. http://www.amazon.com/Lost-Shangri-La-Survival-Adventure-Incredible/dp/0061988359

MixedLoad 11 June 2013 19:26

Confessions of a Sociopath: A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight

I just listened to it in audiobook format and loved it. It was absolutely captivating. Presumably every last one of our BTDT members will identify quite strongly with more than one trait. Likely with about a half dozen.

Called a friend of mine as soon as I got done with it (2nd day), who is an incredible Psychologist with decades of experience dealing with SOF, and asked her about it. Her insight was stunning and confirmed many of my suspicions about myself and the interactions I've been privy to my entire adult life, but also reflections of my youth.

Well worth reading/listening to.

Jong 12 June 2013 10:09

Quote:

Originally Posted by MixedLoad (Post 1058290235)
Confessions of a Sociopath: A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight

I just listened to it in audiobook format and loved it. It was absolutely captivating. Presumably every last one of our BTDT members will identify quite strongly with more than one trait. Likely with about a half dozen.

Called a friend of mine as soon as I got done with it (2nd day), who is an incredible Psychologist with decades of experience dealing with SOF, and asked her about it. Her insight was stunning and confirmed many of my suspicions about myself and the interactions I've been privy to my entire adult life, but also reflections of my youth.

Well worth reading/listening to.

I guess those insights from the psychologist were too embarrassing to share? :biggrin:

MixedLoad 12 June 2013 13:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jong (Post 1058290442)
I guess those insights from the psychologist were too embarrassing to share? :biggrin:

Actually not in the least bit so let me elaborate:

If anything it was affirmation for the "why" and "who" questions or thoughts I've had about my surroundings.

It's also no coincidence that SOF units are almost exclusively populated with people who exhibit at least a handful of the traits that are screened for to determine sociopathy. And not in a negative light, but specifically searching for some of the traits as they're near conclusive indicators of an individuals ability to deal with many of the situations they'll be professionally subjected to.

"Sociopath" also does not equal "serial killer", which is likely contrary to popular belief. It's entirely too complex for me to explain but suffice to say that if you read the book you might learn a fair bit about something you might not yet know a whole lot about.

Take these three examples:

1. None of us cry ourselves to sleep after shooting someone in the face. At least none of the guys I've been around. Including the majority of a certain professional segment of women I've worked with.

2. We can, completely devoid of emotion, fire someone. And not give a flying fuck if "Bob", who is a chronic underachiever has a family to feed. He's not useful, maybe even detrimental to our team/unit/organization. Bob has to go. I'll never give Bob a second consideration if he's not meeting the standard.

3. We all had a belief that we were the absolute best at something if we wanted it badly enough. We never quit and to a T I saw those who succeeded at courses I attended (selections) exhibit satisfaction when someone quit or clearly failed. They were not meant to be part of ____.


As a kid, adolescent and adult I've never given a shit about weak people. I protected a few, but more for the reason of beating the shit out of someone who thought they were a badass and could get away with it. Mainly, I despise weak people because they have a choice not to be. However they consciously make that decision. Logically they don't have to be but their overly emotional mindsets make up reasons to be.

I can somewhat rationalize it in women, but when I see guys who don't meet standards I hold myself to, I don't see much use for them. Do I understand why they are like that? Yes. I just don't care for it at all. If one of them gets smoked it brings out the same reaction as if someone squashed a fly. I simply don't care and get caught up in, what I consider to be, fake empathy. It seems like bullshit to me.

8654maine 12 June 2013 13:37

Quote:

Originally Posted by MixedLoad (Post 1058290516)
...your post...

Agree.

RBS 12 June 2013 13:42

Herman Melville: Omoo

Been hooked on early writings about Polynesia for about the last year.

Bearcat06 12 June 2013 14:12

A Foot Solider for Patton: The Story of a "Red Diamond" Infantryman with the U.S. Third Army by Michael Bilder

Really good read thus far.

Jong 12 June 2013 15:24

Thanks for sharing. I know what you mean. I just went to a civilian paramedic course and had a hard time keeping my mouth shut about somethings that would have probably horrified some of the other medics in their regards to saving 500lb behemoths!!

Kim 13 June 2013 01:05

Relic - by Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child (part of their Pendergast series about an FBI agent who solves some "interesting" cases throughoug his career)

Great read so far.

SOTB 15 June 2013 18:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by MixedLoad
"Sociopath" also does not equal "serial killer", which is likely contrary to popular belief....

+ Pi.

Years ago, mankind began to develop much more centralized societies. And in this process, and IMO largely due to things being easier and people able to relax instead of fight for their lives each and everyday, Type-A meateaters began to disturb those who weren't Type-A meateaters. At about the same time, the world's second-most dangerous group of charltans appeared -- psycho(logist)s (the first most dangerous group are the espousers of religion). And these charltans immediately recognized the threat posed by meateaters (who generally told the psycho(logist)s to fuck off), and therefore sought to stigmatize the meateaters with a shit title.

They couldn't accomplish this by simply stating the meateaters were meanies, because this showed the charltans to be pussies (in addition to being conartists). So they pointed out anyone who would lie or kill or steal or any other sort of non-law abiding practice and lumped in the meateaters as well. As such, if you don't generally care about people or their silly laws (unless those laws are ones you support, of course), and you refuse to be satisfied with dreaming, and you consider pain to sometimes be a necessary price for accomplishment -- you were titled as a sociopath.

Which to ME is just fine. I prefer to be lumped in with the dangerous people, instead of the meek. I've never felt more alive and comfortable when I was surrounded by guys like me and people who wanted (or would want) to kill me. But put me in a party with a bunch of pussies and I immediately try to find an exit.

I'm a sociopath, and I'm fine with that. And society can take comfort in knowing I'm not a serial killer, yet....

AustinPT 17 June 2013 18:23

Currently reading "American Commando" about the Marine Raider battalion in WWII. Interesting stuff. Also reading "We Were Soldiers Once..." Got to see Joe Galloway speak when I was at Ft Hood. Don't know what took me so long to get around to reading the LZ Xray story. Listening to The Outpost on audible.com. The phrase "fucked up as a soup sandwich" comes to mind listening to the situations described there.

leopardprey 18 June 2013 22:59

Quote:

Originally Posted by AustinPT (Post 1058292234)
Currently reading "American Commando" about the Marine Raider battalion in WWII. Interesting stuff. Also reading "We Were Soldiers Once..." Got to see Joe Galloway speak when I was at Ft Hood. Don't know what took me so long to get around to reading the LZ Xray story. Listening to The Outpost on audible.com. The phrase "fucked up as a soup sandwich" comes to mind listening to the situations described there.


Ordered a copy of American Commando. Looks like a good read, and interested in reading how he translated his Nicaraguan guerilla skills into combatting the Japanese on Guadalcanal - which the review states the books delves into.

GracieLou 20 June 2013 15:17

True History of the Kelly Gang, Peter Carey. I had a hard time starting this book because of the way is it written, but now I can't put it down. Pretty crazy life for the Kelly clan...

Bearcat06 20 June 2013 16:19

Just starting: Mission to Berlin: The American Airmen Who Struck the Heart of Hitler's Reich by Robert Dorr.

Just finished: A Foot Solider for Patton: The Story of a "Red Diamond" Infantryman with the U.S. Third Army by Michael Bilder

Excellent book about the common foot solider in WW2.

Titus 20 June 2013 21:41

Pilgrims Progress - John Bunyan (1678)

I'm not sure if anyone here is into old Christian literature, but it's about as good as they come. I'd recommend a more modern edition though, the Old English can get really tedious after awhile.


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