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-   Book Reviews (http://www.socnet.com/forumdisplay.php?f=226)
-   -   What are you reading? (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=40592)

GPC 22 June 2013 09:50

Sniper by Nicolai Lilin novel about the Chechen war.
Oddly no use of shovels yet.:biggrin:

GirlwithaGlock 22 June 2013 22:55

Today finished Fifty Dead Men Walking by Martin McGartland. Freaking crazy story, can't believe he made it out alive.

Macka 22 June 2013 22:59

Read Going Home and Surviving Home this week. Both were entertaining, made a lot of good points, but sometimes the situations worked out a little too conveniently. But, if you're looking for entertaining and a little thought provoking reading, I recommend these books.

Macka 25 June 2013 11:26

I'm 70 pages into "Holding Their Own". The way the author lays out the collapse of America is spooky as you could see it happening incrementally just like he describes it.

GracieLou 25 June 2013 17:48

The Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John C. Bogle.

Great book that is simple and easy to read and understand. Vanguard investors will recognize the author's name and his philosophy - index fund investing for the long haul.

GirlwithaGlock 27 June 2013 18:20

The American Frugal Housewife by Lydia Maria Child. Written in 1832 and contains tons of good simple wisdom.

B 2/75 27 June 2013 19:37

WWZ

12Foxtrot4 27 June 2013 22:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by GirlwithaGlock (Post 1058294262)
Today finished Fifty Dead Men Walking by Martin McGartland. Freaking crazy story, can't believe he made it out alive.

Great book, we don't get to look through the eyes of those who stand at crossroads and choose a direction. Wonderful view of the inside of "the troubles".

12Foxtrot4

GirlwithaGlock 28 June 2013 15:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by GirlwithaGlock (Post 1058296101)
The American Frugal Housewife by Lydia Maria Child. Written in 1832 and contains tons of good simple wisdom.

Guys, since last night I found this book online and wanted to share the link, if anyone is interested (it is a free download from The Project Gutenberg):

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13493

With all the recent discussions about health and diet I found Child's General Maxims for Health very much to the point:

Quote:

Rise early. Eat simple food. Take plenty of exercise. Never fear a little fatigue. Let not children be dressed in tight clothes; it is necessary their limbs and muscles should have full play, if you wish for either health or beauty.

Avoid the necessity of a physician, if you can, by careful attention to your diet. Eat what best agrees with your system, and resolutely abstain from what hurts you, however well you may like it. A few days' abstinence, and cold water for a beverage, has driven off many an approaching disease.

leopardprey 28 June 2013 22:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by GirlwithaGlock (Post 1058296532)
Guys, since last night I found this book online and wanted to share the link, if anyone is interested (it is a free download from The Project Gutenberg):

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13493

With all the recent discussions about health and diet I found Child's General Maxims for Health very much to the point:

From 1832, and still good advice for today. Some things do not change. Thanks for posting.

leopardprey 1 July 2013 08:53

Reading "Behind Japanese Lines - with the OSS in Burma" by Dunlap.

Really good book. Goes into detail about some of the other players as well, such as a Colubmian Order Priest who took all his Cachins from his congregation and joined up with the OSS.

Lot of old photos in the book as well.

Joe723 1 July 2013 20:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by leopardprey (Post 1058297197)
Reading "Behind Japanese Lines - with the OSS in Burma" by Dunlap.

Really good book. Goes into detail about some of the other players as well, such as a Colubmian Order Priest who took all his Cachins from his congregation and joined up with the OSS.

Lot of old photos in the book as well.

Sounds really good. I'll put it on my list.

Joe723 1 July 2013 20:54

I'm reading "Leatherstocking Tales" By James Fenimore Cooper - on the first one "The Deerslayer". Written in 1841.
I read it in 5th grade and it's still pretty good. Between this book and John Wayne movies.... very formitive for a young lad.

sabasarge 1 July 2013 22:11

Churchill, by Paul Johnson, one of my favorite historians.
There are plenty of longer (wordier) tomes out there on the subject, but Mr. Johnson does a great job of painting a picture of this remarkable man, warts and all.
The chapters dealing with Churchill's roll in the two World Wars, particularly WWII ('though by no means exclusively), are illuminating to say the least.

GracieLou 5 July 2013 14:29

I just started The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. I saw the movie and enjoyed it, but I hope book is just as good!

GirlwithaGlock 5 July 2013 15:11

Quote:

Originally Posted by GracieLou (Post 1058298884)
I just started The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. I saw the movie and enjoyed it, but I hope book is just as good!

I liked the book quite a bit when I read it back in the day but I didn't even know about the movie. I will look into it!

GPC 8 July 2013 10:05

Into The Fire by Dakota Meyer.

GPC 10 July 2013 09:50

After reading Into The Fire I believe the officer running the TOC and whoever came up with the BS ROE should be flogged.

I believe those Marines could have been saved if they had Artillery support.

NWElkhunter 10 July 2013 12:03

Nonprofit Kit For Dummies

bardog 12 July 2013 09:23

Sultan's Yemen 19th-Century Challenges to Ottoman Rule by Caesar E. Farah

GirlwithaGlock 13 July 2013 10:16

I started reading American Canopy: Trees, Forests, and the Making of the Nation by Eric Rutkow. I am only a few pages in but so far it has been a fascinating. Highly recommend it for nature and history lovers alike.

bardog 17 July 2013 08:46

I've just read "The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945 (Liberation Trilogy)" By Rick Atkinson. This is a must read for WWII buffs.

leopardprey 17 July 2013 12:54

Quote:

Originally Posted by GirlwithaGlock (Post 1058301738)
I started reading American Canopy: Trees, Forests, and the Making of the Nation by Eric Rutkow. I am only a few pages in but so far it has been a fascinating. Highly recommend it for nature and history lovers alike.

Thanks for the recommendation. Just ordered a copy from Amazon. Taking a graduate level course in Forestry right now, so this will be good supplemental reading.

GracieLou 20 July 2013 19:05

I just started reading, Gotcha Capitalism, How Hidden Fees Rip You Off Every Day - and What You Can Do About It! by Bob Sullivan.

Of course, most of you are probably aware of these hidden fees and price mark ups brought to you by cell phone and cable companies, satellite TV, Internet access, etc...

The book is organized according to different types of services and also includes sample letters and emails that you can use to contest some of those fees in hopes of getting them reduced or eliminated.

Might be helpful to some here...

MakoZeroSix 21 July 2013 15:22

Just read the short story "Nirvana" by Adam Johnson in August's Esquire magazine. He won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction this year for a book about North Korea. I am totally blown away by how profound and scary it was. He's like William Gibson was in the 1980's- only you know that his dark vision will come to pass, whereas with Gibson it was mere speculation. Cyberpunk at its finest.

Couldn't find the actual story online- but here is an article discussing it. Totally worth buying the magazine for.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/tech...uture-15712142

sabasarge 21 July 2013 15:30

Halfway through Empire of the Summer Moon. by S.C. Gwynn.
A really enjoyable read primarily about the Comanches and the tenaciousness with which they held out as the last formidable barrier to the expansion Westward.
Incredible horsemen, and amazing warriors.

Oldpogue 21 July 2013 18:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by sabasarge (Post 1058304634)
Halfway through Empire of the Summer Moon. by S.C. Gwynn.
A really enjoyable read primarily about the Comanches and the tenaciousness with which they held out as the last formidable barrier to the expansion Westward.
Incredible horsemen, and amazing warriors.

That's a great book for all of the Lonesome Dove fans out there. There actually a Comanche warrior named "Buffalo Hump." The Comanches actually had a sense of humor in their names and he was also known as "Coyote Vagina".

A lot of good stuff about the original Texas Rangers. It was the Rangers who put Samuel Colt back into business after he had declared bankruptcy. The Comanches were such good horsemen that they could fire off about a dozen arrows to the one shot that the rangers had. They contacted Colt about his six shooter and he was back in business.

Believeraz 22 July 2013 03:14

I just finished The Widow's Strike by Brad Taylor. It was a good read.

I am working my way through The Anatomy of Motive by John Douglas with a highlighter in hand. I found his rebuke of Ted Bundy's final interview (James Dobson, blaming pornography addiction for his crimes) interesting. Days later I attended a pitiful class purporting to teach a particular discipline of criminal investigations. The instructor used the Dobson interview as a catch-all indictment of deviant interest causing violent crime. I tend to believe Douglas' take on this one.

sabasarge 22 July 2013 16:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oldpogue (Post 1058304666)
.....There actually a Comanche warrior named "Buffalo Hump." The Comanches actually had a sense of humor in their names and he was also known as "Coyote Vagina"........

Not to be forgotten is his given name in their language....Po-cha-na-quar-hip, which translates to "erection that won't go down"
True story :biggrin:

OutsideTheB 24 July 2013 22:33

Bought Circle of Friends by Charles Gaspario about the massive federal crackdown on Insider Trading a few days ago. Can hardly wait to find time to read it.

Bearcat06 24 July 2013 23:22

Starting: The Miracle of Father Kapaun: Priest, Soldier, and Korean War Hero by Roy Wenzl

Father Kapaun was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism in the Korean War as a POW and is one of 7 Chaplains in history to have received the MOH

He graduated from Conception Abbey Seminary College in Conception, MO......which is my hometown.....

nofear 24 July 2013 23:49

Just finished the Halo series, and now starting the Leviathan Wakes series.

I need series or multi-thousand pages books...I read too damn quick.

AK49 25 July 2013 21:38

Red Circle by Brandon Webb, SEAL Ret.

Good read. Seems like a no bullshit, stand up guy.

B 2/75 25 July 2013 22:23

Got three books reading right now, two of them are the lead installments of a series of books, both of which I read MANY years ago and are well worth revisiting:
  1. CASCA - The Eternal Mercenary, by Barry Sadler. Excellent pulp fiction in this series of a dozen or so books
  2. The FOXFIRE series - Hillbilly knowledge written up for posterity's sake back in the late 60's and 70's.
  3. Into the Heart of the Sea - The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex, by Nathaniel Philbrick. Story of the sinking of a Nantucket whaler in the Pacific by an enraged sperm whale, and the subsequent 4,500 mile open-boat voyage by the survivors. Their surviving the sinking and making it into the longboat was just the beginning...

AK49 26 July 2013 00:56

B 2/75

Keep us posted on Into the heart if the Sea. Sounds like a damn good book.

osubuckeye762 26 July 2013 09:11

I am bouncing back and forth between, The Last Line by Lt. Col. Anthony Shaffer (RET) and American Warrior by Gary O'Neal.

OutsideTheB 28 July 2013 01:21

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bearcat06 (Post 1058306013)
Starting: The Miracle of Father Kapaun: Priest, Soldier, and Korean War Hero by Roy Wenzl

Father Kapaun was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism in the Korean War as a POW and is one of 7 Chaplains in history to have received the MOH

He graduated from Conception Abbey Seminary College in Conception, MO......which is my hometown.....

BC, you need to start teaching this stuff yourself. :smile: Is there any military history you don't know??

Bearcat06 28 July 2013 08:26

Quote:

Originally Posted by OutsideTheB (Post 1058307071)
Is there any military history you don't know??

Lots...hence the reason I am reading more and more as I get older.

Trivia for the day.... Clearance Thomas attended the Conception Seminary with the intentions of becoming a Catholic Priest. He left 1968 after he heard some students rejoicing at the assassination of MLK......

AustinPT 28 July 2013 16:24

Into the Heart of the Sea was an excellent read. Who knew giant turtles made portable food sources?

GirlwithaGlock 28 July 2013 19:23

Untangling the Web by the NSA - brilliant resource.


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