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-   -   Iranian Resistance Groups/News (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=125058)

RedBull 4 September 2015 17:20

Iranian Resistance Groups/News
 
Figured I would throw this up as a mega thread, I know some people follow the Iran issues and there is quite a lot going on behind the scenes with various political and ethnic groups as far as movements go.

RedBull 4 September 2015 17:30

Kurdish movement groups inside Iran:

KDPI(Kurdistan Democratic Party-Iran. Recently picked up arms once more and are putting troops in and on the border of Iran- Recent attacks include burning down a Iranian military outpost that was being built over near Bokan-

KDP-I(offshoot of above group) Rearmed as of 2014, recent attacks include killing a iranian intelligence officer in Rabat, Recent attack against regime troops(Qods???) outside of Rabat and Sardasht.

KDPI/KDP-I Currently have taken over and are holding two villages south of Rabat from the Iranian Regime- Don't have information on any of the fighting as this is something that happened within the last 8 hours.

Komalah-(socialist/nationalist group) Has done several attacks recently, mainly against patrolling Iranian military units, have yet to do a larger operation other then shoot and scoot.

PJAK-Were in firefight two days ago-2KIA and 6 WIA unknown number of Iranian casualties-They were ambushed near a mountain route.

RedBull 4 September 2015 17:40

Jundallah/JAA/HAI(all are basically the same damn group they were fragmented after their leader was killed 2010, but there is talks that they are now coordinating with each other. So far its been mainly kidnappings and small random attacks against police or basij officers. So far the groups havent associated with their counterparts such as the BLA/BLF(baloch iranian branches) due to the religious divides, but there has been coordination between the paki and iranian branches.

RedBull 7 September 2015 08:14

Probably should have mentioned the Iranian Jundallah isn't a group any more it fragmented in 2010 after the leader was killed, but there's rumors they reformed into one group or a loosely associated umbrella group system.

There's been protests in bokan and mahabad the last two nights with calls to take up arms against the local regime government and against the regime itself.

So far Iran's been slow on response.

2 kdpi were killed Friday during a operation at a regime border checkpoint.

RedBull 11 September 2015 18:41

There is now a peshmerga unit(s) operating inside the kermanshaw iranian area. They are consolidating currently, should know more as it's released publicly.
The balochs in Pakistan launched a attack on a Pakistani military convoy near gwader (not really relevant to Iran but good info) IEDs hit two vehicles no further skirmish.

Balochs are doing a recruitment in Afghanistan in attempts to fill ranks for the Pakistan groups (this has been ongoing for sometime with the BLA/BLF) also both groups are claiming the balochistan politicians in Pakistan have no right to be in their positions. They've also called out for iranian balochs to start attacking and bombing iranian government and military targets due to iranian regime forces executing 6 political protesters in iran today.
If the JAI/HAI or other Sunni extremist Baloch groups heed the call it'd be the first time the Pakistan and iranian Baloch movements work together (Paki balochs are not super extremist like the main iranian ones)

There's also been a attack by a Arab group in khuzestan, Iran (lower SW iran below iranian kurdistan) they attacked iranian government buildings signaling the first attack by a iranian Arab group on the Shia regime in 10 years.
That's about it for this week.

Messed up the group acronyms in a previous post.
HAI/JAI are what was once Iran Jundallah.
BLA/BLF is the main Baloch movements not affiliated with any Jundallah offshoot.

RedBull 17 September 2015 06:27

PRK (one of the Kurdish groups operating in Iran) declared war on the regime yesterday. Stating they would now attack whenever wherever and the peace agreement is off. They kicked it off by bombing/ambushing iranian regime inside the city center of Shno, Iran.(Sno is in what the kurds call Rojhalat or east kurdistan). Possible civilian casualties, possibky 4 regime troops killed and 1 confirmed armored vehicle destroyed. Unknown on any other casualties as far as kurdish or civilians at this time.

So far no other kurdish group has responded, but there I'd a good chance Komalah and pjak etc follow/fall inline with the statements.

No news on the Arab groups doing anything this week as well as the balochs.

The balochs in Pakistan kidnapped and killed 6 Pakistan "supporters" Tuesday for supposedly working with the government. The BLF took responsibility (also claims they are going to start bombing schools and other civilian infastructure)

RedBull 25 September 2015 16:42

The Iranian KDP party publicly announced this week they are sending peshmerga into Iranian Kurdish cities once again. Released a video and images of them in Sardasht, Shno, and Mariwan. They also targeted Regime religious police and executed two Iranian intelligence officers at their houses this week.

The ASMLA group(group south west in Khuzestan, Iran) has started bombing Iranian oil pipelines,(They actually started in Apr but their attacks were shitty, it appears they've upgraded their explosives..) ASMLA is basically a Baathist Iranian group, who even though they say they don't, has ties with the Muslim Brotherhood and a couple other nutjob extremist groups.

The Iranian Baloch groups are sending troops into Pakistan due to current military operations by the Pakistan military and intelligence in the Pakistan part of Balochistan. Doubtful it will spill over into Iran, but it is going to keep them bogged down more in the Pakistan then in Iran due to the operations and them fighting with the Pakistan balochs. Its not new news, but they are also using the afghan/pak border to run their training camps more so now then in the past as the Iranians and the Pakistani military have pretty much clamped them down from building training bases in the border region there.

Other then that its been a quiet week up in the area.

jdogonroad 25 September 2015 16:55

Aren't or weren't some of the original ISIS guys Baathist? As in, the old Iraqi Army, part of Saddams tribe? It's hard to tell the players apart unless you understand the historical reasons they're fighting each other.

P304X4 26 September 2015 20:56

Are any of these groups are friendly to the US? I don't recognize any if they are. There are even some Kurdish groups who have no love for the US. How do we play both ends against the middle?

Sharky 27 September 2015 20:25

Good info. Keep it coming and thanks.

jdogonroad 27 September 2015 21:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by P304X4 (Post 1058510183)
Are any of these groups are friendly to the US? I don't recognize any if they are. There are even some Kurdish groups who have no love for the US. How do we play both ends against the middle?

Kurds have good reason to not trust the U.S., if I remember my history correctly.
Regarding playing both ends, how about we try being a faithful ally. I don't think we've been that since that unpleasantness on the Asian mainland in the early 50's.

RedBull 28 September 2015 11:29

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdogonroad (Post 1058510033)
Aren't or weren't some of the original ISIS guys Baathist? As in, the old Iraqi Army, part of Saddams tribe? It's hard to tell the players apart unless you understand the historical reasons they're fighting each other.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdogonroad (Post 1058510033)
Aren't or weren't some of the original ISIS guys Baathist? As in, the old Iraqi Army, part of Saddams tribe? It's hard to tell the players apart unless you understand the historical reasons they're fighting each other.

There are still quite a few Baathists in ISIS. A lot of the ones that have been mentioned are former Saddam commanders etc. I am unsure exactly how they became part of ISIS, but I would assume like in syria the merger of various groups into one entity is how it happened. But the tactics and strategy from ISIS didnt come from random Jihadists, it came about from the inclusion/joining of groups that contained military personnel who were loyal to Saddam and those who fought the american's during as well as after saddam was finished(amazingly enough a lot of the Baathist Iranians are former Iraqi Baathists who fled after the coalition came in.

They are not exactly friendly to Americans either, while they currently won't go out of their way to hit American or western interests if the opportunity arises IE western oil companies doing business in Iran they definitely will take up hitting any soft targets they find. And a lot of the oil comes from where the ASMLA and other Baathist groups call home, so there will probably be a uptick in violence once western companies start doing business with Iran.

RedBull 28 September 2015 11:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by P304X4 (Post 1058510183)
Are any of these groups are friendly to the US? I don't recognize any if they are. There are even some Kurdish groups who have no love for the US. How do we play both ends against the middle?

Most of the Rojhalat(Rojhalat=Iranian Kurdistan) Kurdish parties currently are friendly to the US, but not on a level like it used to be. It would take a hell of a lot of action for them to fall inline with anything the US gov proposes currently.

How do you play both ends? Well at this point other then sending them arms and military equipment covertly, you really can't. All the current parties fighting the Iranian Islamic Regime are either on the Terrorist watch list or are banned by the regime.
Politically dealing with any of the anti-regime groups now would be like sticking your dick in a 220volt electrical socket. The current administration has pretty much fucked the support they had against the regime by these groups, by doing the sanction deal.
The Iranian baloch groups while mildly Islamic, were not against the US in any way shape or form, but in the last four months or so they have started taking a more anti-american approach, as well as the other groups for the dealings with Iran.

About the only ones who might possibly work with the US and listen to what they have to say would be the Kurdish KDPI/KDP-I, Komalah group and a couple other smaller groups.
But either way for the US to garner any support it won't happen with political meetings anymore. There have been some talks within the last couple weeks of the kurdish parties uniting militarily and if that happens, its going to move past the political discussion stage into more inline with what is happening in turkey.

I was actually just informed by one of the political leaders that apparently , The two KDPI branches(KDPI/KDP-I) have said they are going to unite once again before the groups congress election/presidency in November.(KDPI groups are social democratic-they elect leaders much like in western countries but president is elected by the congress) That leaves the various socialist groups such as Komalah and PAK and a few others doing operations separate for now.

And another well known and highly regarded Iranian regime intelligence member was killed outside one of his families businesses today in Bokan, Iran by kurdish forces.

RedBull 28 September 2015 11:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdogonroad (Post 1058510311)
Kurds have good reason to not trust the U.S., if I remember my history correctly.
Regarding playing both ends, how about we try being a faithful ally. I don't think we've been that since that unpleasantness on the Asian mainland in the early 50's.

America has fucked the kurds since the forming of the UN. The second and fourth(or possibly the fifth) United Nations resolutions dealt with the Kurdish uprising in Mahabad.
Short history lesson, kurds rose up in 45/46 in Mahabad Iran, they were supported by the soviets, America and its allies didn't like it and pretty much force voted a UN resolution in which the soviets pulled back their support pretty much overnight to the kurds and it led to a slaughter.

Then you have all the other conflicts as well, iran-iraq war, desert storm, gulf war etc where the kurds helped with intel etc and were given nothing in return from us and even in some cases had genocidal attacks against them for supporting the US.

But truly if the US wants a stabilized area to run operations out of and a decent ally in the middle east, the kurds would be who I would put my money on. Historically and even today they believe in a separation of religion and state as well as a more Federalist government. We've consistently backed and been bedfellows with to many middle east governments who bordered on or were Monarchist and Despotic governments. And it has continuously bit us in the ass and our allies as well as created a lot of instability(Iraq, Egypt,etc) That and even after all the half assed support we have given them, they have not once turned their backs on American interests.

If Kurdistan puts up a referendum(which will happen in the next two years if not sooner) and America doesn't push their support here, you can damn well bet it will be Russia or another power player who attempts to garner support in Kurdistan.

RedBull 28 September 2015 12:00

added post to post above.

P304X4 28 September 2015 21:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdogonroad (Post 1058510311)
Kurds have good reason to not trust the U.S., if I remember my history correctly.
Regarding playing both ends, how about we try being a faithful ally. I don't think we've been that since that unpleasantness on the Asian mainland in the early 50's.

I would agree to being a faithful ally to someone who wanted us but it seems many hate us as much as the ones they are fighting. I agree our Gov. has brought much if not all of this upon us. Just thought maybe we could pass on enough intel to the weaker side to keep them fighting amongst themselves leaving both sides less time and resources to attack us.

jdogonroad 28 September 2015 22:59

Good point, P30. Information is easier to slip to people than weapons, and some times just as deadly. Anything would help.

RedBull 29 September 2015 06:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdogonroad (Post 1058510540)
Good point, P30. Information is easier to slip to people than weapons, and some times just as deadly. Anything would help.

Intel might be the best bet to swing favor on groups too. A lot of the groups who are reorganizing are not tied down to their old religious extremism as before, due to a lot of the younger generation getting in and having a more nationalistic view. A good example would be one of the main baloch groups,which just recently formed after breaking away from the HAI, while Sunni, they no longer are pushing a anti-American Sunni agenda, but a nationalist agenda. With the majority of Iran's population under the age of 35, it may be one of the best ways to influence a group away from extremism and anti-western sentiment, without actually giving them military training and equipment that could be used later on to indiscriminately kill civilians and create sectarian instability etc as intel is only good for so long before its worthless.

Rockville 29 September 2015 15:46

RedBull
what open source sites you used?

I use
https://www.ctc.usma.edu/?s=kurd&type=all&program=all&order=desc

www.heritage.org also

Both www.aei.org's http://www.irantracker.org/ and http://www.iranwatch.org/ got Kurd stuffs


Quote:

Originally Posted by RedBull (Post 1058510565)
Intel might be the best bet to swing favor on groups too. A lot of the groups who are reorganizing are not tied down to their old religious extremism as before, due to a lot of the younger generation getting in and having a more nationalistic view. A good example would be one of the main baloch groups,which just recently formed after breaking away from the HAI, while Sunni, they no longer are pushing a anti-American Sunni agenda, but a nationalist agenda. With the majority of Iran's population under the age of 35, it may be one of the best ways to influence a group away from extremism and anti-western sentiment, without actually giving them military training and equipment that could be used later on to indiscriminately kill civilians and create sectarian instability etc as intel is only good for so long before its worthless.


RedBull 30 September 2015 14:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockville (Post 1058510655)
RedBull
what open source sites you used?

I use
https://www.ctc.usma.edu/?s=kurd&type=all&program=all&order=desc

www.heritage.org also

Both www.aei.org's http://www.irantracker.org/ and http://www.iranwatch.org/ got Kurd stuffs

None. I have contacts with all of the groups I've mentioned.


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