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  #41  
Old 29 April 2015, 18:14
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Thank you for the advice FFAC. The power clean and the snatch allude him thus far although I know he is working towards those. Olympic lifts will be very important for him and I need to find someone who actually knows what they are doing. YouTube videos are helpful to a point but they don't help correct the small form issues that I just don't pick up on.
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  #42  
Old 30 April 2015, 09:57
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Thank you for the advice FFAC. The power clean and the snatch allude him thus far although I know he is working towards those. Olympic lifts will be very important for him and I need to find someone who actually knows what they are doing. YouTube videos are helpful to a point but they don't help correct the small form issues that I just don't pick up on.
Yeah, I watched every youtube video out there, but until I actually worked with an oly lifting coach, I just didn't get it. Honestly a good crossfit coach/program would probably do wonders for him. Especially if he can't do pullups yet.
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  #43  
Old 31 August 2015, 18:27
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The kid is now about 63 and 275 going into his freshman year (14 yo) benching 255 and deadlifting 455 (bottom heavy kid) and running a 5.31 40 yd dash. He was selected for the US National Team and I am so proud that he will be wearing Team USAs uniform in February at AT&T Dallas Cowboy Stadium on ESPN vs Team Canada. He also was invited for a campus visit to a D1 FBS school and an FCS school, that was pretty cool. Got his picture with their Heisman and National Championship trophies.

Should be a good season, he prepared like crazy. As much as I have enjoyed lifting with him, he gets noticed more because of his ability to move than anything else. Strength is critical in a lineman but there are so many of these really big strong kids at these camps who cant move and are ignored by the coaching staff. "Nipples to Knees" is the mantra I keep hearing for the big guys.

Make them into good athletes first, serious strength and meat can be added by the strength coach at college.
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  #44  
Old 31 August 2015, 18:48
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Yeah, I watched every youtube video out there, but until I actually worked with an oly lifting coach, I just didn't get it. Honestly a good crossfit coach/program would probably do wonders for him. Especially if he can't do pullups yet.
Crossfit will most likely instill bad lifting habits. A dedicated lifting coach would be far better, in my experience.
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  #45  
Old 31 August 2015, 20:01
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The kid is now about 63 and 275 going into his freshman year (14 yo) benching 255 and deadlifting 455 (bottom heavy kid) and running a 5.31 40 yd dash.
Make them into good athletes first, serious strength and meat can be added by the strength coach at college.
Jebus, what is he eating, fetuses?
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  #46  
Old 31 August 2015, 22:48
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The kid is now about 63 and 275 going into his freshman year (14 yo)
Dear God...
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  #47  
Old 31 August 2015, 23:55
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Jebus, what is he eating, fetuses?
I've got to compliment you here Hot Mess. That cracked me up.
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  #48  
Old 1 September 2015, 10:34
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Jebus, what is he eating, fetuses?
Fetuses might be cheaper than what he eats right now.

Seriously though, he is legendary amongst his peers for how much he can put away. I've never seen anything like it. I would be worried but he trains year-round and is actually pretty lean. Most people who talk to me figure he is only 220-230. That's a good thing.
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  #49  
Old 1 September 2015, 10:37
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We are also seriously considering a Judo/ BJJ gym for off season. It seems what they do is pretty analogous to what he does in the trenches and he needs to toughen up. And the flexibility/ balance would be really great.
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  #50  
Old 3 February 2016, 16:47
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So proud of this kid. He is playing at Cowboys Stadium Friday afternoon against Team Canada (#59). They handled them pretty well this morning in their scrimmage so it should be a win. Much of the great advice in this thread helped us get here. He got a letter from Oregon the other day too. Hard work pays off, well informed hard work pays off even more.

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  #51  
Old 3 February 2016, 19:09
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Dude, you have much to be proud of!
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  #52  
Old 4 February 2016, 02:01
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So proud of this kid.

Attachment 32253
That's awesome! You've got a lot to be proud of there, seems like you've got him on a good path.


If I could offer my two cents on the goings from here for him I'd love to help. I coach Strength and Conditioning (tactical as well), Sports Performance, competitive Olympic Weightlifting all the way up to the International level, and I coach a little bit of CrossFit on the side for an extra buck. I just graduated with a degree in this field and I work at a PT clinic. I also have been shadowing a mentor of mine (PT, ATC, MS, CSCS) for about 2 years as well.

I HIGHLY recommend you keep him active in the off-season, regression happens much faster than most may think. Most professional sports teams are shifting towards this model because it helps them get their guys back on track faster in the pre-season and keeps their susceptibility to injury lower. For this, I would recommend acquiring a good olympic weightlifting coach (I can recommend one depending on your area), a physical therapist with a sports performance/strength and conditioning background (look up clinical athlete), and a sports massage therapist. They don't need to be full time, but going to the same person (one that knows their ass from a hole in the ground) is extremely beneficial. Knowing an athlete's training background helps us out greatly when it comes to writing programs and coaching movements.

Vaguely put, the off season is divided into post-season and pre-season phases.

The weightlifting coach should be able to keep him active during the entire off season as well as tighten up his technique on the power movements. That will specifically be important when the weights get heavy in the pre-season, it will significantly reduce his chances of becoming injured moving heavy weight quickly. The key to the off season is to push a little, but not too hard. Post-season is a good time to back off on the heavy stuff and give his nervous system a rest.

This is where the PT and Olifting coach will come in handy, making sure his movement patterns will not lead to injury down the road. Many times, the way someone lifts won't hurt immediately or 3-6 months down the road but they'll begin to run into problems especially when they start to push the weight and positions/ligaments are compromised from bad patterns.

With the post-season lower weights, he can really ingrain those good neurological pathways. This is also an opportune time to work on strengthening his rotator cuffs and hips, another easy way to reduce his chances of becoming injured. The PT will have a lot of lower impact movements for him so that when you start pushing weights hard again in the pre-season phase, his stability and flexibility will be that much more improved.

Remember, the goal of all strength and conditioning programs are to improve performance and REDUCE injury, and you'd be surprised how many injuries come in the weight room. The massage therapist will ensure that his ROM is good or gets better and his recovery during the pre-season is on point, but be wary of stretching too much. It can create laxity in the joints and inhibit an athletes ability to brace that joint against impact or the ability to absorb weight properly. An athlete only needs to be as flexible as their sport demands of them. I would recommend having someone administer an FMS on him to see where he stands (Functional Movement Screen).

I won't recommend any particular exercise program to you because when properly implemented, most will do exactly what they say they will do. That said, a mixture of a couple different types of training wouldn't hurt as long as his recovery is on the front burner. Many times over-training will lead to injury. Google a company called "Complete Human Performance", they are experts on recovery for the most part and they are fantastic at blending different styles of training.

I am biased towards olympic weightlifting movements but it does lack in the other planes of movement as well as obviously the conditioning portion (though any Olifting coach worth their salt will be assigning conditioning to their athletes). Power, strength, stability, balance (not many know about that one), flexibility, force production, force absorption, kinesthetic awareness, proprioception...I could go on but you get the point. There is a reason these movements are used in the majority of collegiate and professional sports weight rooms and the earlier you get him started on them, the better off he'll be when he gets tossed into a D1 weight room.

Sorry for the novel, it's late and I'm tired as hell but I gave you as much off the top of my head as I could think of. I'll do my best to answer any questions you might have, and if I can't answer them I can probably find the answer or point you to someone that is an SME on it.

Good luck!!
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  #53  
Old 8 February 2016, 16:49
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Good luck!!
Wow, thank you for this advice! I apologize for not responding sooner, I missed this post. I really appreciate you taking the time to write that up.

You have definitely provided me with new insight into how to approach this off-season. I had not even considered "over stretching." He is extremely tight and we are constantly trying to improve his ROM, especially in his hips.

The good news is that they pounded Canada 43-6. He had a great experience and is already back in the weight room as of last night.

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  #54  
Old 25 February 2016, 11:10
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DC, I have 3 boys who all play or played football. My HS sr to be is also a big kid, a shade under 6'6" and a lean 265lb with plans on reaching 285-290lb by the end of next spring.

Here's my takeaway on lifting after watching the boys go thru a variety of work outs, the recruiting process, one playing D1 ball, and one most likely to soon be playing at the D1 level.

Lifting for playing ball is about 2 goals- absolute strength and explosion. There is a deserved negative correlation with lifting=bulky=slow. However, you have to develop maximal strength and develop explosion to be a ball player. Absolute strength is developed by lifting heavy weights. Explosion is developing by lifting sub maximal weights as fast as possible.

After seeing a variety of programs, HIIT, Olympic lift, this that, etc. I wanted to find out who/what gym/program developed the strongest guys on the field in terms of functional, usable strength.

After spending some time with a few coaches at the D1 level, some who knew their business and some who merely benefited from great recruiting, I went to Westside Barbell in Columbus, Ohio. Louie Simmons' lifting approach is about developing absolute strength and explosive strength without constantly smoking the CNS allowing for recovery. Additionally, hip flexibility is the key to his squat program.

I went several years ago, the Patriots, Seahawks and Packers were using Louie as a consultant, their OL play demonstrated the value of his approach.

The other critical component as touched on by others is he cannot have enough flexibility. It's the key to injury prevention and college scouts constantly evaluate big kids flexibility. Linemen hip flexibility is a HUGE measure. I spent last weekend working a combine in the OL/DL drills and at the conclusion, every scout consistently spoke about two items: a kid's feet -quickness and technique and hip flexibility.

Good luck in the years to come. The recruiting process can be exhausting, but taken in the right way your son can enjoy it. There are plenty of used car/snake oil salesman who seem to have found their niche as recruiters, but there are others who represent their schools well.

If you have any questions, PM me.
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  #55  
Old 24 February 2018, 21:43
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My son finally got his first D1 FBS offer today from a G5 program. He started training for this in seventh grade and Im so pumped that he has had this experience. He learned how to stick with something long term, be weighed and measured (these programs can be brutally honest) and that dedication and hard work pay off. Its only his junior year so he expects to get a handful more offers before national signing day.

Even more proud that he told me he is still thinking about enlisting because he wants to do something important and real.
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  #56  
Old 21 September 2018, 13:47
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The boy finally committed to a school a while back and we could not be happier about his choice (great engineering degree, relatively close to home so we can see his games). He wound up with about ten D1 full-ride offers before it was all said and done. He is actually graduating HS early and will be playing spring ball at college by March. Much of the advice in this thread has been really helpful getting us here.

Some interesting things we learned along the way-

For OL/ DL, height/ frame matter far more than weight (theyll fill you out when you get there)
Footwork and flexibility are far more important than max bench
Letters from schools mean nothing
Youre not being recruited until an actual position coach is speaking with you personally
Virtually all recruitment happens on Twitter now (every offer he got started with a DM on Twitter)
D1 offensive lineman are mutants. My kid is 63 310 lbs and is dwarfed by kids headed to larger programs such as UW, Stanford, USC, etc. The only thing that got coaches attention was his mobility and motor, period.

We had fun with this process but it is rough on kids. The boy had to learn how to hear D1 coaches look him in the eye and tell him that he is great but not what they're looking for, hard to hear when you are 15/ 16 yo. He is definitely mentally tougher after three years of that but he's learned at a very young age that hard work and dedication do pay off and to never quit.

His own head coach told him just last year he would NEVER play D1 ball. It was rewarding for him to have 10 D1 offers role in over the next 6 months.
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  #57  
Old 21 September 2018, 14:49
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10 D1 fullride offers! Congratulations!
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