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Old 7 January 2018, 03:49
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Staying warm

What does everyone do to stay warm during shift? Itís -11 here in northeast Ohio. I hate wearing big bulky coats. I use a black 1/4 zip-up Cabelaís fleece over my body armor and put my uniform shirt over top. Iíve found itís a good idea to get a couple one size larger duty shirts for this reason. Silk-weight under my duty pants. The Hatch gloves work ok for a couple minutes, traffic stops, quick calls for service. I struggle with the idea of thick gloves, even while directing traffic. Just donít like the idea of big bulky gloves getting in the way of my dexterity. Still use my Polartec stocking cap, issued to me in 2005 (I believe). Keep some hand warmers in your duty bag. Stay warm, be careful, read case law, YouTube is your friend.
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Old 7 January 2018, 07:30
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I live and work in Florida.
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Old 7 January 2018, 19:08
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My problem is not going down when it's 115 outside. Not so much this sweltering 70 degree cold.
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Old 7 January 2018, 20:15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneisel256 View Post
What does everyone do to stay warm during shift?
Not an LEO, just a guy who spends a lot of time outside in the cold: Buy several high quality thin layers (i.e. long underwear and intermediate weight) and the warmest hat you can find, throw your fleece over all that and you might be surprised how long your hands will stay warm with light or even no gloves. Throw a pair of heavier ones in just in case. You might even find that you can ditch the fleece. You'll obviously have to experiment with the number of layers and the temp in the car.

If you spend more than a little of your shift indoors it's probably easier to wear maybe one layer underneath and look for a better outer layer, probably windproof. Easier to take off so you don't vapor lock if you're inside for awhile. There are some excellent, super warm, low bulk jackets out there nowadays, and not necessarily an arm and a leg if you shop around a bit.

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Not so much this sweltering 70 degree cold.
That's damn near a survival situation

Last edited by hawkdrver; 7 January 2018 at 20:26.
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Old 7 January 2018, 21:13
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While we don’t get quite that cold, I buy Kuiu stuff and LOVE it. Doesn’t hurt that it doubles for hunting trips.
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Old 8 January 2018, 01:46
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I live and work in Florida.
Watch out for those alligators, sharks and BIG bugs!

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My problem is not going down when it's 115 outside. Not so much this sweltering 70 degree cold.
The phrase you'll never see put together in the same sentence ever again: "sweltering 70 degree cold."

Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkdrver View Post
Not an LEO, just a guy who spends a lot of time outside in the cold: Buy several high quality thin layers (i.e. long underwear and intermediate weight) and the warmest hat you can find, throw your fleece over all that and you might be surprised how long your hands will stay warm with light or even no gloves. Throw a pair of heavier ones in just in case. You might even find that you can ditch the fleece. You'll obviously have to experiment with the number of layers and the temp in the car.

If you spend more than a little of your shift indoors it's probably easier to wear maybe one layer underneath and look for a better outer layer, probably windproof. Easier to take off so you don't vapor lock if you're inside for awhile. There are some excellent, super warm, low bulk jackets out there nowadays, and not necessarily an arm and a leg if you shop around a bit.

That's damn near a survival situation
I am in the process of getting an outer 1/4 zip-up "uniform shirt" approved by the bosses. It would be nice to have a base-layer turtle-neck (turtle-neck or tie is mandatory in winter) with just that 1/4 zip on over it. It would have to made because I can't seem to find what I'm looking for, specifically. Thanks for the input, much appreciated.

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Originally Posted by Front_Sight_Bang View Post
While we donít get quite that cold, I buy Kuiu stuff and LOVE it. Doesnít hurt that it doubles for hunting trips.
Is your agency hiring? I'll have to take a 2nd mortgage out on the house to buy Kuiu! They make some really awesome stuff. I have a gray 1/4 zip base layer I use during bow season early November. That wool is really warm. Did you buy that wool cleaner they sell, seems like a spoof to me?
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Old 8 January 2018, 01:57
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As an Alaskan who grew up next door to you, IMO, you cannot do anything simple to keep warm. Even Uber awesome clothing will keep you either warm in the outside, or overheated in your car.

Since I work currently in the most divergent climates I can think of (outside in Alaska, and in Boiler rooms of businesses), my advice it thus:

If you know you're about to go outside, turn you cars' heater all the way up. Allow yourself to be overheated for a few minutes before being outside and freezing.

I'm a smoker. I have to go from +72 to -35 all the time. I try to overheat myself as much as possible before going out, which gives me 15-20 minutes of comfort when in the extreme cold before I have to go back in. This is using the same clothes, without a jacket. This technique allows me to acclimate without getting married to a coat.
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Old 8 January 2018, 02:10
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I finally resorted to wearing Sorels when needed. I had some that were just below calf height and now have ones that cover most of my calves. The taller ones have a bit better traction. They are still slim enough that I can get my "windproof" jumpsuit legs over the boots. This will keep any snow out and maintains a more professional appearance. The boots are black. I don't recall the model name but they are similar to this-https://www.sorel.com/mens-bear-xt-b...boots#start=19

I've gotten really good deals in the spring on them the last few years via Amazon.

I'll admit, I was a little surprised our admin allowed them.

I assume our public generally does not like to see LE in balaclavas for many reasons. I try not to wear them but sometimes with the cold/wind, there just isn't a good reason not too. I have a really nice windbloc one from Outdoor Research that has lasted 15 years.

Gloves, just like the rest of the body, use layers. When I know I will be layering gloves for a shift I wear a basic liner glove that doesn't compromise my dexterity. I then have a pair of heavier gloves to put on over my liners if I know I'm going to be out on something that has a low level of probability for confrontation.
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Old 8 January 2018, 14:31
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polypro glove liners are ok, and more durable, but I also have some smartwool liners that are warmer that would go over my flight gloves (so I didn't have go get bigger flight gloves to wear over them). didn't loose dexterity and my cockpit switches/buttons were more fiddly than a weapon/radio/lights/cuffs, etc.

so a liner, and leather shell combo (when needed) that's not too tight on the liners/fingers can be a good trade off vs. ski gloves.

the only other recommendation that I can make is the better you acclimatize to the environment, the less it hurts. momma may not like you keeping the house heat at 50... but it hurts less when you do go out. it's a practice I always tried to follow, hot or cold, despite complaints from co-habitants. when I lived at Drum, I kept the house at 52 in the winter which could be a 30-70 degree difference to ambient. in the hot summers of the south, I'd keep the AC at 80-85, just enough to not sweat inside. but I'm retired now and I don't play that shit, as much.
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