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Old 10 February 2018, 06:36
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A California Heist

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Documentary · In California's complex water system, a handful of corporate landowners took advantage of a state-engineered system and gained control of the state's most precious public resource, while drought left local homeowners with dry wells.
What was surprising was:
  • 80% of the water is used on 2% (agriculture).
  • 1-Gal of water is used to produce one (1) almond.
  • How much "farm" land is actually owned by corporations.
  • How water made CA agriculture and cities.
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Old 10 February 2018, 10:24
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There's a little bit more to the story than that. The reason droughts have a big effect in California, is the lack of water storage systems to retain water. Environmentalists have steadfastly blocked every common sense attempt to build reservoirs in the state. Homeowners are suffering because they let tree-huggers dictate policy.

Those so-called "water barons" are trying to protect the oldest (200+ years) industry in California: Agriculture. The reason Silicon Valley is so successful is because of the initial infrastructure and development by agri-businesses. Farmers, co-ops and corporations.

A couple of cities got the bright idea 20-30 years ago of installing desalinization plants; which was an excellent idea. They cities never used them. Now they think they can walk in and turn the key and get instant fresh water. Of course, that didn't work, and now they need a billion dollars to replace everything and start over.

Redding, California is about the only city with its head on straight. The rest of the State, County and City leadership are 95% retarded.
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Old 10 February 2018, 10:36
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I'm pretty sure the success of California agriculture is because of some alluvial fan, not water. At least that's what I've been told...
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Old 10 February 2018, 11:43
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I agree with Tracy, but the problem with water in CA is much simpler than all that. There are far too many, by orders of magnitude, people living in areas that don't have water to support the population. The water has to be brought in from somewhere else. There are far too many areas of CA that have significant agriculture without water to support it. The water has to brought in.

Water, in CA, is an expensive commodity, simply because there is not enough of it to support the requirements for it.

Expensive commodities always end up with a nexus of crime around them. Any time government has an ability to control an expensive commodity that is in short supply you will have political corruption.

Take a drive around the east side of the Salton Sea, and you will see what happens when the spigot gets shut off on an extremely productive agricultural area that was totally dependent on irrigation water from far away.
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Old 10 February 2018, 13:46
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Before the Salton Sea there was the Anasazi. Specifically Mesa Verde. Their relatively sudden decline linked to a period of drought, which likely led to their weaking and eventually being invaded by other tribes.

If I was in Cali and had any sort of land at all, I'd be in the backyard making a huge underground ferrocement cistern. They make tons of them in poor villages in China, Africa, etc. Easy and cheap to make in-situ and they work very well. When I make my move to a plot of land in addition to my underground shooting range in the basement, I'll be having a well dug and attach it to a solar pump to keep a cistern filled.
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Old 10 February 2018, 14:16
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Originally Posted by DirtyDog0311 View Post
Before the Salton Sea there was the Anasazi. Specifically Mesa Verde. Their relatively sudden decline linked to a period of drought, which likely led to their weaking and eventually being invaded by other tribes.
That's nice, professor .

Before the Salton Sea there was a flat old dry lake bed. In the early 1900s it had been dry for at least several hundred years. There were some towns and other development built there. Folks wanted to get some agriculture going there, and set about trying to construct canals to shift irrigation water that direction. In 1905 some engineers with the California Development Company screwed up, and caused an overflow from the Colorado River, and the Salton Sea was created. It's been slowly evaporating ever since, and has very little to do with the Imperial Valley's decline and demise as a agricultural center.

Who says no one didn't learn nuthin' from a California public school educashun?
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Old 10 February 2018, 15:46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtyDog0311 View Post
Before the Salton Sea there was the Anasazi. Specifically Mesa Verde. Their relatively sudden decline linked to a period of drought, which likely led to their weaking and eventually being invaded by other tribes.

If I was in Cali and had any sort of land at all, I'd be in the backyard making a huge underground ferrocement cistern. They make tons of them in poor villages in China, Africa, etc. Easy and cheap to make in-situ and they work very well. When I make my move to a plot of land in addition to my underground shooting range in the basement, I'll be having a well dug and attach it to a solar pump to keep a cistern filled.
My Father in Law on Andros Island Bahamas said his one regret about how he built his house 40 years ago was he didn't incorporate a cistern to collect rainwater... If I was going to build in a remote area I would do that and some wind powered water condensers...
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Old 10 February 2018, 15:56
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Question Shit dude...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtyDog0311 View Post
...
Have you ever lived and/or worked in the state of California?
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Old 10 February 2018, 16:49
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I posted up this piece about water rights awhile back, I never understood how complicated the whole deal was, much of it hinging on whether you're located upstream or downstream as opposed to how long you've owned a particular stretch of land adjoining a river or waterway.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...ppearing-river

Look no further than the Owens Valley back when Mulholland, Chandler and a few others basically stole the land (and its precious water) out from under the people living there way back in the day.

That's one of the reasons I liked the movie Chinatown so much, it integrated a fictional story line of the regions real history into the narrative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy View Post
[*]1-Gal of water is used to produce one (1) almond.
One of my sisters is one of those armchair environmentalists, very liberal, always talking about all they do to try and limit their impact on the environment and conserving recources, etc. and she mentioned how she and her family don't drink regular milk but the almond milk, and of course I had to point out to here the amount of water required to produce even one of the almonds that go into her milk, and she knew about it but she just kind of hemmed and hawed. I have a habit of laughing and rolling my eyes whenever she starts speaking about all her initiatives, drives her nuts.
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Last edited by Spinner; 10 February 2018 at 16:54.
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Old 10 February 2018, 16:56
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The State of CA has now asserted ownership of all water in the state. My parents live out in the sticks, not on the water/sewer system. They have lived at/owned this location since the mid-70s. The State now reserves the right to come out and stick a meter on their well to charge them for the water pumped out of the ground. Bear in mind this is not a tax on the water, they can charge them for the water itself.

Puts mineral rights in a new light. New, in the USA, anyhow, always has been standard in 3rd world kleptocracies.
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Old 10 February 2018, 18:05
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Well said!

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Originally Posted by gavin View Post
Puts mineral rights in a new light. New, in the USA, anyhow, always has been standard in 3rd world kleptocracies.
People have been saying that about Kajaki Dam, however, it has fallen on deaf ears...
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Old 10 February 2018, 18:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtyDog0311 View Post
Before the Salton Sea there was the Anasazi. Specifically Mesa Verde. Their relatively sudden decline linked to a period of drought, which likely led to their weaking and eventually being invaded by other tribes.

If I was in Cali and had any sort of land at all, I'd be in the backyard making a huge underground ferrocement cistern. They make tons of them in poor villages in China, Africa, etc. Easy and cheap to make in-situ and they work very well. When I make my move to a plot of land in addition to my underground shooting range in the basement, I'll be having a well dug and attach it to a solar pump to keep a cistern filled.
Say hello to Gilligan and Mary Ann
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Old 10 February 2018, 19:04
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NO NO NO. He gets the Millionaire and his wife.

I've got dibs on Mary Ann & Ginger... both
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Old 10 February 2018, 19:06
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NO NO NO. He gets the Millionaire and his wife.

I've got dibs on Mary Ann & Ginger... both
Hahahahahahahahahahahaha
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  #15  
Old 10 February 2018, 19:08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gavin View Post
The State of CA has now asserted ownership of all water in the state. My parents live out in the sticks, not on the water/sewer system. They have lived at/owned this location since the mid-70s. The State now reserves the right to come out and stick a meter on their well to charge them for the water pumped out of the ground. Bear in mind this is not a tax on the water, they can charge them for the water itself.

Puts mineral rights in a new light. New, in the USA, anyhow, always has been standard in 3rd world kleptocracies.
WA state just had some sort of law (Hirst Decision) come into effect about disallowing the drilling of new wells due to the effect of stream flows or something to that effect. Lots of undeveloped property owners were rightfully pissed. My place has a 2000 gallon rain water collection system as the only source of water till I drill a well.
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Old 10 February 2018, 20:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy View Post
People have been saying that about Kajaki Dam, however, it has fallen on deaf ears...
Only problem at Kajaki Dam is that there is no one there to call everyone "motherfuckers" anymore, and the place is simply falling apart without it!
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Old 10 February 2018, 20:48
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^^^Five (5) fucking convoys and NOT one-shot fired and the place is the most dangerous fucking AO in Helmand; WTF did they miss?

Anyways, development has grown so much where I'm at, water pressure has dropped and the bill has increased...
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  #18  
Old 10 February 2018, 23:04
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Originally Posted by Gray Rhyno View Post
I'm pretty sure the success of California agriculture is because of some alluvial fan, not water. At least that's what I've been told...
Shhh, you'll wake the children.
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Old 11 February 2018, 00:25
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Well, this thread is completely derailed from Guy's simple pointing out a NatGeo documentary, to this, where I'll just put up on the table that when HH6 and I worked up the criteria for new home location, water availability was on the list. As we got into the details, well permit availability, water quality, and we'll costs were all factored in. While we have municipal water stubbed out on the property, we went with the well.

California? It's a desert that forgot that without the continued hand of man, it will again be a desert.
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Old 11 February 2018, 09:06
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B 2/75 View Post
Well, this thread is completely derailed from Guy's simple pointing out a NatGeo documentary, to this, where I'll just put up on the table that when HH6 and I worked up the criteria for new home location, water availability was on the list. As we got into the details, well permit availability, water quality, and we'll costs were all factored in. While we have municipal water stubbed out on the property, we went with the well.

California? It's a desert that forgot that without the continued hand of man, it will again be a desert.
Did you look at average rain fall and a way to gather/contain that water?

And how much water are you storing from the well, if any?
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