Go Back   SOCNET: The Special Operations Community Network > Areas of Expertise > Languages

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 21 April 2017, 05:35
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Denver
Posts: 57
Best Practices to Study for DLPT V

I am using the next six months to study for the Arabic DLPT V with a goal of achieving 3/3. Currently, my approach consists of:

1. Listening to Arabic BBC during the day while at work.
2. Reading Arabic at least an hour a day (coworker let me borrow the Ace my language Arabic DLPT book http://acedlptarabic.blogspot.com/)
3. Enrolled and currently attending a SOFTS Arabic Intermediate-Low language course.
4. Attend weekly language hour.

Any other options that have worked for others achieving a 3/3 in Arabic or other languages?

What process have others used? I am not tied to using the methodology above and would appreciate insight from those who have been there, done that!

Last edited by mbmx13; 21 April 2017 at 05:40. Reason: grammatical error
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 21 April 2017, 06:05
B 2/75's Avatar
B 2/75 B 2/75 is offline
Blending In
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Black Mountains
Posts: 9,647
What about mixing it up with the local Arabic community?
__________________
"To the last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I stab at thee, for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee" Melville / Captain Ahab
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 21 April 2017, 06:53
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Denver
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by B 2/75 View Post
What about mixing it up with the local Arabic community?
That is something I looked into. I guess it depends on your position, security clearance, etc. Each Arabic community is different, there could be some CI/CT concerns that would need to be addressed first before mixing it up with the local Arabic community. If those concerns are addressed then I think it would really help for the OPI and maybe the listening portion of the DLPT. Some DoD organizations have created their own weekly language hour as a result of the CI/CT concerns. Has mixing it up with the local Arabic community worked for you?

Last edited by mbmx13; 21 April 2017 at 06:55. Reason: needed to elaborate
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 21 April 2017, 07:43
Hot Mess's Avatar
Hot Mess Hot Mess is offline
In Vino Veritas
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Where you vacation
Posts: 10,231
Immersion but it is a mixed bag. The test is in standard Arabic and whichbever community you find is going to speak their local dialect. Not to mention is aforementioned CI threats.

Talk to the 10th SFG language lab. They have to have cleared persons to teach and they should have an idea.
__________________
Come on boys, you got to do it right, pray to the moon in the middle of the night
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 21 April 2017, 07:43
gavin's Avatar
gavin gavin is offline
Been There Done That
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Back where it all began
Posts: 4,631
What is your current score on the Arabic DLPT V?
__________________
Clumsy Latin Phrase!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 21 April 2017, 10:00
SN's Avatar
SN SN is offline
Old and Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: The GREAT State of Texas
Posts: 4,555
Go online and read newspapers.
__________________
FISHDO
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 21 April 2017, 10:52
MountainBum's Avatar
MountainBum MountainBum is offline
Vivat Fraternitatis
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Palo Alto
Posts: 656
Few things. Assume you're talking MSA. First, the -V has zero correlation to performance in the field. Talking to locals may actually make things worse because their local dirka is going to tune your ear differently than what the test requires.

Second, you need to have a mental model for the utter academic pedantry of that test by getting your hands on a practice English DLPT V and the corresponding answers. Once you take a look at that, it'll click as far as "oh, that's what the nerds who wrote this test are looking for." This will make all the difference between a 2+ and your coveted 3.

Third, find a show on Al Jazeera that contains punditry on current news, preferably with multiple talking heads and a host. Regular BBC news is at a solid 2 level. You need to attune your ear to opinions, inference, defending POVs etc. Same with reading - find something similar to the Economist and start reading every article you can. Helps to find a periodical that also has an English version so you can check yourself. When the show / article you're looking at stretches the limits of your attention / vocabulary, then you know you're doing it right.

Fourth, per OPI. If it's MSA - who gives a fuck about your score as long as you pass. So you are shooting for two things - consistent grammatical control and the ability to maneuver through various topics with equal command of vocabulary. Find listening material that is square in 2 territory and practice saying it out loud. Repeatedly. Then come up with your own topics. Forget trying to go for a 3 for the OPI, it's a waste of resources.

Finally, BPT shitcan everything you've learned and start over when you hit the ground with host nation. Not sure what your job is but if it necessitates interacting with locals downrange, you better eat some humble pie and attempt to learn the dialect as quick as you can. Speaking MSA on the street pegs you as a school-trained pedant, which may or may not behoove you.

Source: Dude who grudgingly maintained 3s for the $$$ despite MSA being utterly useless.

Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 25 April 2017, 07:36
peter28 peter28 is offline
Authorized Personnel
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Between Rainbows and Unicorns
Posts: 432
Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainBum View Post
Few things. Assume you're talking MSA. First, the -V has zero correlation to performance in the field. Talking to locals may actually make things worse because their local dirka is going to tune your ear differently than what the test requires.

Second, you need to have a mental model for the utter academic pedantry of that test by getting your hands on a practice English DLPT V and the corresponding answers. Once you take a look at that, it'll click as far as "oh, that's what the nerds who wrote this test are looking for." This will make all the difference between a 2+ and your coveted 3.

Third, find a show on Al Jazeera that contains punditry on current news, preferably with multiple talking heads and a host. Regular BBC news is at a solid 2 level. You need to attune your ear to opinions, inference, defending POVs etc. Same with reading - find something similar to the Economist and start reading every article you can. Helps to find a periodical that also has an English version so you can check yourself. When the show / article you're looking at stretches the limits of your attention / vocabulary, then you know you're doing it right.

Fourth, per OPI. If it's MSA - who gives a fuck about your score as long as you pass. So you are shooting for two things - consistent grammatical control and the ability to maneuver through various topics with equal command of vocabulary. Find listening material that is square in 2 territory and practice saying it out loud. Repeatedly. Then come up with your own topics. Forget trying to go for a 3 for the OPI, it's a waste of resources.

Finally, BPT shitcan everything you've learned and start over when you hit the ground with host nation. Not sure what your job is but if it necessitates interacting with locals downrange, you better eat some humble pie and attempt to learn the dialect as quick as you can. Speaking MSA on the street pegs you as a school-trained pedant, which may or may not behoove you.

Source: Dude who grudgingly maintained 3s for the $$$ despite MSA being utterly useless.

Good luck.
I found MSA useful as a base. That's how I started listening to the news, which includes commentary that can often include dialect. And, no matter how hard he tries he'll be identified as an American - or non-native speaker.

When in doubt, throw out a "yanni ... inshallah"
__________________
This is my signature.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Our new posting rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 23:37.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Socnet.com All Rights Reserved
SOCNET