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  #421  
Old 15 April 2020, 18:43
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Waiting on some slightly warmer weather.
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  #422  
Old 16 April 2020, 08:42
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My wife came up with an idea that we're using that helps when watering seedlings- she stated using a spare squirt bottle, the type you keep olive oil/canola oil in, to water the seedlings.

Its a lot more precise than a watering can and easier to control the amount squirted on each seedling.

We've started over 200 plants in the house, waiting for Mother Nature to make up her freaking mind about the weather.
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  #423  
Old 16 April 2020, 08:46
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I’m just starting some indoor plants now. My growing season comes a few weeks later being in the mountains. Good watering tip.
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  #424  
Old 16 April 2020, 13:23
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Finally found some grape tomato plants so now we're set -

Roma tomatoes
Grape (mini roma)
Red Beefsteaks
Better Boys

The first two will be raised in pots on the pool deck and the other ones in the garden
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  #425  
Old 16 April 2020, 14:11
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Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
Finally found some grape tomato plants so now we're set -

Roma tomatoes
Grape (mini roma)
Red Beefsteaks
Better Boys

The first two will be raised in pots on the pool deck and the other ones in the garden
Nice choices. Bonnie Bells do well here. My problem is getting them ripe. (I love fried green tomatoes) Iím planting a couple extra just for that very purpose. Beefsteaks as well.
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  #426  
Old 16 April 2020, 19:45
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Nice choices. Bonnie Bells do well here. My problem is getting them ripe. (I love fried green tomatoes) I’m planting a couple extra just for that very purpose. Beefsteaks as well.
Bonnie Bell is the brand I buy- especially since they and Lowes will 'guarantee' them, so if they die early I just take back the stump and get another plant

As far as getting them ripe- buy a few extra plants to leave alone.

I'm growing mine in a mix of my 'natural' garden soil and a newly purchased, loaded , spread, and tilled-in ton of composted horse manure that I got a trailer load for $30...
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  #427  
Old 20 April 2020, 01:39
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So, how many of you are actually farming a little, as in more than an acre of crops.
Iím on five acres and the majority is devoted to critters. We do goats, chickens, pigs, rabbits, and turkeys. I have a 40x75í kitchen garden and another 60x120í for field crops of corn and beans. My goal is to get 80% of the familyís food off our property and then to branch out into a market garden for a CSA. My area is pretty rural so a CSA can be a tough row to hoe but there are some farmers markets and COOPs available. Iíll have to cut into the pasture for the critters to expand the growing beds but luckily Iím building sweat equity fencing the neighbors property.

Last edited by wowzers; 3 June 2020 at 23:10.
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  #428  
Old 20 April 2020, 02:37
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Iím on five acres and the majority is devoted to critters. We do goats, chickens, pigs, rabbits, and turkeys. I have a 40x75í kitchen garden and another 60x120í for field crops of corn and beans. My goal is to get 80% of the familyís food off our property and then to branch out into a market garden for a CSA. My area is pretty rural so a CSA can be a tough row to hoe but there are some farmers markets and COOPs available. Iíll have to cut into the pasture for the critters to expand the growing beds but luckily Iím building sweat equity fencing the neighbors property.
Are the 'hoops' of your tunnels made from PVC? If so, what size/length? What is the width and the method of anchoring at the bases?

Thanks!
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  #429  
Old 20 April 2020, 03:04
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The long beds are 1/2”10’ PVC conduit. The beds are 30”x25’ with about a 1’ walkway in between. The long beds have some 18” 3/8 rebar for anchors and the raised beds I use regular conduit hangers attached to the bed walls. I had the raised beds on hinged covers but they couldn’t hold up to the wind.

Took your advice and built some wire cages for my spuds. I’ll let you know how they do.
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  #430  
Old 20 April 2020, 07:41
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The long beds are 1/2Ē10í PVC conduit. The beds are 30Ēx25í with about a 1í walkway in between. The long beds have some 18Ē 3/8 rebar for anchors and the raised beds I use regular conduit hangers attached to the bed walls. I had the raised beds on hinged covers but they couldnít hold up to the wind.

Took your advice and built some wire cages for my spuds. Iíll let you know how they do.
I use tires for my potatoes..

I use cattle panels for my cukes.
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  #431  
Old 20 April 2020, 08:06
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I use tires for my potatoes..

I use cattle panels for my cukes.
Absolutely...and woven wire fence sections zip-tied into round barrels for tomato cages (use a rod to anchor in place so a storm won't blow them over once the plants expand--one tomato plant and cage per tire).
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  #432  
Old 20 April 2020, 08:46
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We have about an acre this year. We plowed a whole new section. I will drop a pix later.
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  #433  
Old 20 April 2020, 21:12
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Speaking of plowing-

you might want to sharpen those tiller blades- it makes the job a LOT easier.

Ask me how I know
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  #434  
Old 21 April 2020, 20:15
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I have a tiller on my garden tractor. Looking to get a post hole digger and a back hoe.
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  #435  
Old 24 April 2020, 22:01
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Productive day-

transplanted-

Asparagus (2 years before any production)
English Cukes
Better Boy Tomatoes
Red Beefsteak Tomatoes
Roma Tomatoes
Grape Tomatoes
Crook Neck Squash
Zucchini
Blue Lake Green Beans
Coolapenos

next

okra
Boston Pickling Cukes
Straight 8 Cukes
Watermelon
radishes
rainbow carrots
red onions
yellow onions
garlic
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  #436  
Old 24 April 2020, 22:55
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This whole pandemic thing is making a lot more folks thinking about gardening, canning and self reliance. From what I’m reading, it will come in handy to have these stock supplies again next winter!
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  #437  
Old 25 April 2020, 07:07
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My wife and I really enjoy the gardening and canning routine. We both grew up with it, then didn't do it for years as we PCS'd around. Now as old folks we get a lot of enjoyment out of it.
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  #438  
Old 25 April 2020, 08:30
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I grew up doing it. I have had to teach my wife about it- they (her and her siblings) thought everything came from Winn-Dixie...
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  #439  
Old 25 April 2020, 08:36
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Absolutely...and woven wire fence sections zip-tied into round barrels for tomato cages (use a rod to anchor in place so a storm won't blow them over once the plants expand--one tomato plant and cage per tire).
We use hog panels. They are galvanized, very stout and reusable every year.
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  #440  
Old 25 April 2020, 16:19
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I use cattle panels for trellises for cukes- had them for about 10 years now. Cut a couple of them in half and create 'tent' trellises for the cukes.

Used them once for sweet potatoes- had vines so thick that I burned the panels rather than attempt to pull off the vines...

YMMV
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