SOCNET

Go Back   SOCNET: The Special Operations Community Network > General Topics > Weapons

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 27 July 2011, 12:19
P38's Avatar
P38 P38 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 855
1916 Luger

I had to share this event. Yesterday I took possession of a 1916 Luger that has been in the family since 1918 when my grandfather acquired it in Belgium at the end of WWI. He was a Corporal in the 37th MP Company of the 37th Infantry Division. The gun was kept in a trunk for over fifty years before being passed to an uncle who kept in a safe for the last forty years. It's never been fired in all of that time. Early last week my 91 year old uncle agreed that it was time to pass it along. With the Luger comes a 1916 leather holster that's in great shape, the tool which is still in the holster, and a couple of magazines (not serial number matched). The bluing probably looks as good as it did the day that it was handed over by a German POW.

The weapon had to be shipped from a gun shop in California to a gun shop in my location and I was pretty nervous about that until it arrived. This probably sounds bad but, when I picked it up I felt about the same way that I did when I held my new born daughter for the first time. I don't know squat about this gun, so there is much to learn. It needs a good cleaning as the old oil is a bit gummed up so my first task is to figure out how to take it apart. After that my job is to store it, care for it, and then select the right relative to take possession when my time comes to pass it along.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 27 July 2011, 12:27
iraqgunz's Avatar
iraqgunz iraqgunz is offline
Rest In Peace
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm and sunny Arizona
Posts: 6,018
Without pics, it never happened. Having said that I am the owner of a WWII Mauser P38 pistol that my uncle brought back from the war (when it as actually permissable-imagine that). As you may be aware the Lugers can be very valuable depending on a variety of factors. Be very careful when you disassemble it for cleaning so you don't scratch of damage anything. I think there are a few comprehensive write ups about the Luger.

Try and do a Google search. In any case you have something that is definitely to be treasured. Enjoy it.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 27 July 2011, 18:25
Just Another Guy Just Another Guy is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Dunnellon, FL
Posts: 816
Congrats. I inherited my Father's 1938 Luger and will only part with it when my stepson inherits it from me.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 27 July 2011, 18:46
Kolde Kolde is offline
Banned User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Miami, Florida
Posts: 39
I fired a 1940s era at the gun range recently real cool gun. Nice acquisition!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 27 July 2011, 20:38
Carl Spackler
Visitor
 
Posts: n/a
I would love to see as well.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 27 July 2011, 20:55
Hostile0311 Hostile0311 is offline
Ne Obliviscaris
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Malta
Posts: 2,453
Nice. I'd say leave it as is. Great piece of history. Pics are always nice.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 28 July 2011, 09:36
jportal50 jportal50 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: The Great State of Texas
Posts: 500
Congrats, that is a nice pistol Similarly, I inherited a German, 1918 Luger, leather holster, when my father passed away. It had been passed down via my grand father as well.

When taking it apart for cleaning, take care you do not lose the small spring behind the trigger. I had to use a big magnet for approx 4 hours to find mine.

Again, congrats.

Quote:
Originally Posted by P38 View Post
I had to share this event. Yesterday I took possession of a 1916 Luger that has been in the family since 1918 when my grandfather acquired it in Belgium at the end of WWI. He was a Corporal in the 37th MP Company of the 37th Infantry Division. The gun was kept in a trunk for over fifty years before being passed to an uncle who kept in a safe for the last forty years. It's never been fired in all of that time. Early last week my 91 year old uncle agreed that it was time to pass it along. With the Luger comes a 1916 leather holster that's in great shape, the tool which is still in the holster, and a couple of magazines (not serial number matched). The bluing probably looks as good as it did the day that it was handed over by a German POW.

The weapon had to be shipped from a gun shop in California to a gun shop in my location and I was pretty nervous about that until it arrived. This probably sounds bad but, when I picked it up I felt about the same way that I did when I held my new born daughter for the first time. I don't know squat about this gun, so there is much to learn. It needs a good cleaning as the old oil is a bit gummed up so my first task is to figure out how to take it apart. After that my job is to store it, care for it, and then select the right relative to take possession when my time comes to pass it along.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 28 July 2011, 09:56
Harley Busa's Avatar
Harley Busa Harley Busa is offline
Aegar primo
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 329
Not sure of the rules on this, but would it be possible to post pics? Not alot of weapons like that around especially with the holster. I'd love to see the pistol and most especially the holster. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 28 July 2011, 10:36
P38's Avatar
P38 P38 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 855
Due to numerous requests, I will take a photo and post it when I get home this evening.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 28 July 2011, 16:07
Pzjgr Pzjgr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 11
Sounds like a nice rig! A few things to know about Lugers...they came with 3 basic barrel lengths, the regular issue Army luger had a 4" barrel. Navy lugers had a 6" barrel, and the "Artillery" Lugers had a long 8" barrel and special tangent sight.

You may want to check the front of the grip strap, a fair number of WWI Luger were unit marked here, although by 1916 that was less likely. I would think most likely the maker would be DWM or Erfurt.

If the mags have the wood bottom, that is a bonus, they are worth a fair bit more (not that it matters so much with a family heirloom, but good to know).

Pretty much all parts should be numbered, at least with the last 2 digits of the s/n. All the parts matching is the best of course as far as collectiblilty goes.

Sometimes the holsters were unit marked, either on the back (along with typically the manufacturer and year manufactured), or inside the top flap.

If it would be helpful, I can give you some links that would give disassembly instructions. Its not too bad once you get the hang of it, and somewhat easier than disassembling the Broomhandle Mauser, whose action is like a clockwork puzzle.

I have a 1940 dated 42 code (Mauser, Oberndorf). Plus a few other WWII German pistols...
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 28 July 2011, 20:09
P38's Avatar
P38 P38 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 855
It's the 4" barrel, the magazine numbers don't match the weapon, the weapon itself has all the correct serial numbers to show it's original, it has a black ink stamp inside the flap with these letters: B.A. IV
Attachment 16646

Last edited by P38; 22 May 2013 at 11:59.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 28 July 2011, 20:21
CarbineM1 CarbineM1 is offline
On the Extract Bird
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,345
very nice....thanks
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 28 July 2011, 20:44
P38's Avatar
P38 P38 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 855
I want to add that it was manufactured by DWM (Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken) and it has the shoulder stock lug. Lugerforum.com has very nice technical details to include detailed instructions on how to disassemble the gun. I also wanted to mention a couple of features of the holster. First, there is a small leather pocket inside for the weapon tool. I don't know how to use the tool, but it's obvious that every machined edge had a specific purpose. From what I've read the tool is usually missing. There is also a long leather strap inside the holster with a pull tab on the outside. I thought the Luger was a little difficult to get out of the holster and then I realized that you pull the strip down, and the loop inside pulls the weapon up so you can grasp it.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 28 July 2011, 21:06
eltrane's Avatar
eltrane eltrane is offline
shiver me timbers
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: utah
Posts: 2,334
I hope I look that good when I am 95 years old. Congrats on the acquisition.
__________________
RIP SSG Greg Gourley
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 28 July 2011, 21:36
Harley Busa's Avatar
Harley Busa Harley Busa is offline
Aegar primo
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 329
What a great weapon and holster! Fantastic condition.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 29 July 2011, 02:15
iraqgunz's Avatar
iraqgunz iraqgunz is offline
Rest In Peace
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm and sunny Arizona
Posts: 6,018
P38,

Certain numbers can help you identify things about the weapon and holster. For example- my P38 is marked byf 44 which indicates Mauser (Oberndorf am Neckar). Unfortunately they didn't start using them until after your pistol was made. I am not sure but I think that the BA may be Bekleidungsamt des Armeekorps (Army Corps clothing office) according to some stuff I have seen online. Would you care to post anymore detailed pics of the pistol itself? Markings, etc...

Last edited by iraqgunz; 29 July 2011 at 02:29.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 29 July 2011, 11:00
Pzjgr Pzjgr is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 11
That is a super nice rig! Nice mags, the wooden bottoms are original WWI, and as I said, command a premium price wise (typically $150-$200 per mag). I paid $100 for an aluminum based WWII mag for my rig, and was happy to get it.

The tool is mainly used for disassembly, the bottom blade as a screwdriver, you can remove the grip screws with it. A little known use is the hole...that hole fits over the stud on the follower in the mag, then you can use your thumb on the projection to pull/push down the follower and spring to make loading the mag easier....

The B.A. could very well be Bekleidungsamt der Armeekorps...it would be in WWII, but I cannot say for sure in WWI, I would have to do some reseach...

It looks to have all original finish, with the parts that should be straw finished strawed, and the holster looks to be in fantastic shape.

Its very hard to find a nice complete WWI rig like that, and if it were being sold, it would be worth a good chunk of change....I'd be proud to own it!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 29 July 2011, 13:06
P38's Avatar
P38 P38 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 855
I can now say that B.A. IV stands for Bekleidungs Amt IV or the 4th Army Corps clothing depot. There's an entire description of the German clothing acquisition system that explains it at this website: http://www.pickelhauben.net/articles...arks_5_09.html With some variations, that stamp went inside of just about all clothing items. The internet is such a great resource that helps to satisfy my endless need to know historical minutia.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 30 July 2011, 11:59
GPC's Avatar
GPC GPC is offline
Freelancer
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: LFOD
Posts: 7,408
Sweet,thank you for posting pic.
__________________
Steel Rain Brings The Pain!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 30 July 2011, 12:26
Hopeless Civilian Hopeless Civilian is offline
Only slightly useless.
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Southwest Mississippi
Posts: 1,508
That's a real piece of history you have there, and the fact it's been in your family all this time makes it practically priceless.
__________________
"I'll see your Ninjas and Pirates and raise you.....THE MUSKETEERS!"

" when life gives you lemons, make grape juice and confuse the hell out of them"
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Our new posting rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 22:40.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Socnet.com All Rights Reserved
SOCNET 1996-2020