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  #1  
Old 9 October 2002, 12:34
Sanjuro Sanjuro is offline
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Could use a no shitter

Here's the deal.

I am currently 32, finishing up a post bacc degree at University.
I am going to enlist next year at age 33.

I am very interested in both Special Forces and Rangers. But then who isnt.
Granted I know a million things could come up to keep me from passing or qualifying all the hurdles between recruit and admittance to either of these units.

BUT, that said, I had thought about enlisting active and going ranger assuming I could pass RIP. OR I considered going NG and trying for REP 63.

Question is, at my age, would i be fooling myself that I could serve an enlistment at a Ranger Batt, and THEN ever hope to get into SFAS and through the pipeline to a team? Granted again that this makes a lot of assumptions and might seem like pipedreams and pissing in the wind.

Does anyone starting off at my age ever make that transition, much less make it into either unit. Seems that the odds might be stacked against older candidates? Anyone have first hand exp with this?

Just a note, I am probably most attracted to the full mission profile of the SF (DA as well as training and the added cultural factors), in fact i was studying for diplomacy and INTL Relations in school, as well as passed the exams for the Foreign service officer (state Dept). But I am not ready for desk work yet.

I am also interested in Rangers and do not just view it as a stepping stone to SF, as they are an amazing unit in their own right (plus had a good buddy who who was in Ranger Batt who I looked up to). But I also figure that my chances of passing SFAS and SFQC would be more realistic with several years in a top unit like Rangers.

So I realize the whole question just reeks of wannabee, but considering my age I figured it was worth asking. I have read through most of the info on the site, seen the 5 week prep program for SFAS, and realize the odds against me. But I am already training hard and I guess at this stage that is all i can do.

THanks for any replies.
Sanju
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Old 9 October 2002, 14:31
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18C4V 18C4V is offline
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FYI, the oldest guy in my SFAS class was 44 and he got selected. The oldest guy in my Q-course class was 42 and he made it. The oldest guy in my Ranger Class was 33 and he made it. Shit, the senior medic on my team is 47. If you can hang go for it.
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Old 9 October 2002, 14:33
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well...

not sure how helpful this will be, but here it is.

in my 20's, i was in great shape. I started to slow down a bit in my late 20's, but I just modified my work outs, paid more attention to my diet, and drank less beer. I don't think light beer was even invented back then, in the days BG (Before Goretex).

In my early 30's....I was still pretty much cranking. I wasn't parachuting at the time, and the work I was doing didn't require it. That helped, big-time, and gave me a few more years behind the trigger, I believe. At this point, I had over 330 jumps, both static-line and MFF. I had avoided major injury, aside from minor shrapnel, a busted tooth, a separated shoulder, and the usual owwies in the back and knees.

It was around age 33, I guess....I went back down to Ft. Beginning, and then back to Bragg, and the knees were the first to go. Get up, get down. Mile after mile under the ruck. Knee pads helped, but damn....I still can't take a knee without whimpering like a bitch on the inside, and now I'm 41 (yuck it up, Hazen, you slut). By the time I was 34, ankles were shot. Repetitive sprains made them pretty much untrustworthy. I would fall down, totally busting my ass, with no warning, while walking on even ground. Maybe I'd hit a pebble or a hole, maybe not. My ankles had lost the ability to feel when my feet were at an angle, or flat on the floor. It was weird, and really enraging. By 35, parachuting killed my back. My last jump, I was almost paralyzed (T-10's, high winds, a clue from the Big Ranger, I guess).

Now...at age 41....I spend as much time stretching and doing yoga as I do lifting weights, and I lift hard, super-sets, split routines....and then I really get my heart going with 30 hard minutes of intervals on a stationary bike. Then I run 30-minutes on a treadmill or on dirt. I haul ass, and get a good cardio workout, but no more running on concrete or asphalt, and I dread running on grass because I don't trust my ankles. I have to haul myself up stairs, dread going DOWN stairs, and eat elephant doses of Naproxin (which is AWESOME, btw).

I end the whole thing with a long post-workout stretching routine....I take as long as I need, sometimes up to 45-minutes, just stretching. We're talking a good 2 to 3 hours in the gym, easy. This is what retired guys do, sometimes.

The next day, I'll stretch again, this time in the pool, then swim a 15-minute warmup, an hour-long freestyle session (boo-ya), then a 5-minute cool-down. Then I stretch, yet again. Sometimes, if I'm REALLY frosty, I'll hit the gym after a swim routine and do a half-hour on an elliptical machine, followed by a half-hour on a recline bike, but that's an every other week sort of thing, and it is always followed by a long stretching period. Normally, it's just weights, bike, and running one day, followed by pool work the next day. Every day, I stretch and do yoga. (Yeah, Bill, I do the exercises that firm and tone the ass, too). I spend a lot of time in the gym and in the water, and no longer jump, and anytime I ruck (hiking or hunting), my load rarely exceeds 45lbs, including water, gear, and weaponry.

So. Could I go back on AD and hump the hills? Maybe, for a little while. I doubt I could hump a hundred pound ruck on top of a basic 45-55lb load of weaponry, ammo, grenades, and water, and forget adding a pair of claymores, a LAW and spare ammo for the crew-served weapons. I might pull it off for a while....but ultimately, I would get hurt. No doubt about it. While this old dog can still hunt, and hunt good....I don't deceive myself. I am no longer the youth I used to be. I'm smarter and definitely meaner, but slower, and I'm fine just watching the young 'uns get their first kills.

I knew a guy once, who went to Ranger Batt in his late '20's. He was utterly exceptional. He brought big smoke on everyone. Then he left, went to the master fitness unit, that sort of thing. I never saw an old guy hang like that ever again.

Unless you are an adventure racer, a serious health nut, a total fitness freak....I would be skeptical that you will survive RIP and Ranger School. I can't speak for SFAS. I didn't have to go (I'm THAT old).

My advice: consider an MOS that gives you a good fall-back, whether you make it to Regiment or SF or not. For example, be an Interrogator, or an Intel Analyst. Select whichever requires the most time at DLI (assuming you are not stupid, deaf, or married). Get your MOS training out of the way. DA will then send you to jump school, and then on to either Regiment or SF, but in an Intel slot. You can be a tabless bitch this way, and ease your way in.

If you are a hard case, you can wrangle a Ranger School slot. If you want to test yourself against the ultimate rite of passage and possibly make it into a hazardous duty zone, go to Regiment. You will make friends for life, and never, ever be the same. As an Intel weenie, you may never hear a shot fired in anger. But then....the cooks down in the Mog when the Night of the Ranger went down probably never expected to bust caps, either. But they did. They volunteered just like every other Ranger there, and they loaded up onto the HMMVs.

I doubt you'll bust caps in SF, unless you get real lucky (if that's the term for it) and another "good war" like Afghanistan comes up. As an Intel puke....you pretty much stay in the rear with the gear, though I can envision scenarios where serious language ability, tactical competence and a Ranger tab or SF tab could get you down-range with an ODA or B Team.

If you are intent on combat arms, Infantry....you better be a total hard SOB at your age. You'll get through Basic and AIT. You'll get through jump school, too.

But RIP? I wouldn't bet on it. Ranger School? It would suck like nothing else in life. SFAS? I wouldn't take that wager.

Good luck to you, regardless.


__________________
Ranger Classes 12, 13, & 14-81: 1st PLT, "Bad 'Muthers," Co A, 2d Ranger Battalion, 1980-84.
SFQC 4-84: ODA 151, Co B, 2d Battalion, 1SFGA, 1984-86. SF Association: M-10547.

Last edited by magician; 9 October 2002 at 14:44.
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  #4  
Old 9 October 2002, 15:04
Sanjuro Sanjuro is offline
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Thanks for the Perspective

Heh heh,

Thanks Magician, that was a no shitter if I ever heard one.

18C3V, Thanks for the hope, what years were these guys going thru? was this recent like?

Well I used to be a total stud, (and of course my gf still thinks so), I had a few injuries in the last couple years and am rehabing a shoulder and wrist. I and my docs expect me to be in top form again in 6-8 months. I intend to enlist in about 14 months.

Certainly sounds like my chances are even less than I thought from what Magician said. But being a stubborn bitch I am still giving it a go.

Magician,I do like your advice about choosing a good fall back MOS. My idea was Combat Medic...but honestly I not sure what non combat arms MOS are out there that are "cool"...by that I mean not being a cook or transport or secretary and that people generally rate as interesting. Guess I got some research to do.

Sounds like maybe I am kidding myself that I could BOTH get into Ranger Batt (IF that is possible) AND later putting in for SFAS and passing that and through the pipeline to an ODA.

Figure I should either sign active and drive on with everything for RIP and Ranger Batt OR go ANG and try the REP 63 option I have heard guys talking about. Guess I will see where I am physically when the time comes. Only way to find out is to do it. That is my philosophy.

I guess some guys bodies can hack it and some cant...I know I have slowed down...I didnt peak until my late 20's but then injured myself heavy weight lifting and in Muay Thai and Gung Fu etc...
I guess all I can do is all I can do. I intend to train like a mad man and go for it. I am applying to get onto a firefighting team this summer as a way to test myself and my body (trying for a hotshot team). SHould get a good amount of rucking in there.

Magician, Listening to you I think I have seriously neglected MY strechting routine. Better add more and maybe even yoga. Thanks for the insight into your workouts.

Thanks for the honest no shitter. Appreciated.
Sanjuro
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Old 9 October 2002, 15:14
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Stampee Stampee is offline
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Go for it. Just make sure you get in before the 34 year old mark. As far as which one to go into...seems like you know the basic difference between the two groups (Rangers vs. SF) and therefore know a little as to what to expect. What you need to do is ask yourself, what is it you want most and go for it. Because from what I've been told over and over again, there will come several occassions where you will ask yourself, "why am I doing this? I could be doing something so much more lucrative on the civi side and could be enjoying life...blah...blah...blah." You know what I'm getting at.
In those situtaions the only thing that will carry you through is the desire within to accomplish your goals. Make sure you choose this because you really want it.
As for myself, I've gone with the Rep63 route. I have yet to begin the pipeline, however, I have had the opportunity to train with guys in the 5/19th and experience a smigen of a taste of what to expect, and I loved it. Those guys have shared with me so much advice along with their stories and I really can't wait to get started (2 more weeks :)).
I'm not as old as you (26), but I can relate with your situation. My advice is, ignore the nay-sayers and soak up as much info as you can from those in the know. Oh yeah, also: PT, PT, PT and Ruck, Ruck, Ruck.

SPC Dan
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Old 9 October 2002, 15:19
Sanjuro Sanjuro is offline
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Stampee,
Good luck in the Rep 63. Where is the 5/19th? Was there a tryout or any hassels trying to get in with no prior service (if that is indeed the case). Tell me a little more about your process and exp. You can send me private mail if you prefere (think my mail is in my profile?).

One question, why do I want to get in before the 34 mark? IS there any diff between entering at 33 vs 34? Isnt the total cutoff 35 to enter AD or NG?

Thanks
Sanjuro
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Old 9 October 2002, 16:21
DFC5343
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Thumbs up

Go for it, kick ass but have a back up plan in case. That is the best advice you can have from an old fuck like me. The shit I did I was 19 but retreaded at 28. That almost killed me. Good luck!
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Old 9 October 2002, 16:38
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Oh sorry, I think you're right. 35 is the cutoff.
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Old 9 October 2002, 16:56
stizwv stizwv is offline
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REP 63

By rep63 do you mean 18x??

Cause I think the age limit for that is 30:

-Must be male
-Must be 18 years old upon completion of Basic Training.
-Have not reached 30th birthday by date of shipment.
-Qualify for and volunteer for airborne training.
-Must be a US citizen.
-Must have a high school diploma.
-Must be eligible for Secret clearance.

Not sure about waivers.

I just turned 34 and I'm in better shape than I was during
my initial enlistment (17-21 yrs old)...I DO take somewhat
longer to recover though :D

I definitely think you should go for it...there's a guy in my unit
who's 42 or 43 or something and just got selected (SFAS)...

I think you need a waiver for Airborne after 35...

-stiz
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  #10  
Old 9 October 2002, 17:06
Sanjuro Sanjuro is offline
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Last Questions

Thanks for all the advice and encouragement.

I dont want to shoot myself in the foot here, I have done lots of reading on this site and off. But still have a (more than a) few q's.

Two part q...relating to both SF's and Rangers (I hope it is ok to discuss Ranger stuff here since I dont want to post in 2 places and many guys here were both).

From what I understand from reading the board, if I get a RIP contract i can only get that contract with 11x which is an unassigned combat arms with world wide assignment should i fail. So how does the combat medic (91w i think?) fit in with this? I have seen a bunch of threads about the job of ranger medic, but not sure if you can sign a 91w contract with guaranteed RIP...any guys out t here now with this? Are there other jobs outside of 11x that can get RIP and Ranger batt?

Regarding SF, If I wanted in directly I would need to go 18x which i dont think i qualify for based on age and limited time and slots etc. Or the Rep 63...either of these options require you to choose from ONLY 18b, c, d, and e correct? The other option being to put in 3 yrs, be at least E-4 and then apply for SF and you can come from anywhere in the army? Correct?

Also regarding SF if I understand corrctly you go SFAS, and if you are a go you hit SFQC, with individual training, then MOS training, then group training(including robin sage), language, then sere and then you grad and get assigned to an SF group? Just wondering, with this it seems you wouldnt start and end with the same group of guys since MOS training times vary so much, from 26 weeks to 57(?).

Regarding back up plans. If I shoot for RIP, and dont make it I am basically at the whim of the army correct? Same goes for Rep 63 if I dont make SFAS? What kind of backups are possible?

Please forgive the many q's. I have been following the board for like 2yrs. Did lots of searches but I guess I am still unclear about these issues. Hoping not to fall into the same wannabee syndrome of asking stupid q's that have been gone over a million times.

I Will try to keep my gob shut after this salvo and get back to training. :)
Sanjuro
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Old 9 October 2002, 21:41
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ranger docs

ok....i can address the topic of Ranger medics, but i have to emphasize that my personal experience is pretty old. I was a Ranger medic from 1980-84, and in the first class that attended the old 300f1 SF medic course at Ft. Sam. That would have been in 1982, the Summer of 1982. I'm sure lots has changed since then.

you will obviously have to talk to a recruiter, but I would imagine that it would be relatively easy to get assigned to Regiment as a 91B or 91C (never heard of 91W, but that doesn't mean anything other than that: a lot has changed, and it certainly is possible that the numerical MOS's have changed, as well). They used to call it "guaranteed unit of assignment." In fact, that was the sort of enlistment contract I had, all the way back in 1979. It was contingent, of course, upon completion of jump school and RIP. But Ranger Battalions were always short in the medical MOS's, and good docs were always highly prized, and highly appreciated.

in the olden times BG, you enlisted as a 91B or 91C (combat medic versus nurse), went to Basic, then AIT at Ft. Sam Houston, then jump school at Benning. Then the hard stuff started. You went to RIP. In those days, RIP was run by each Battalion. Nowadays, you have Regimental RIP. I have no informed opinion on how much harder it was then or is now. I know that it is very unlikely that anyone will be physically hit or abused in today's army, and I'm not so convinced that this is such a good thing. Call me old fashioned. If you fear a little hazing or abuse, then why the hell are you seeking combat? Go and face your demons and your fears, and spank the shit out of them. You can do it, just like all the rest of us old guys.

assuming you survived RIP, you then either went to a platoon if you were a 91B, or the Battalion Aid Station (BAS), if you were a 91C. I think I have written previously on the huge chasm between 91B's and 91C's in the Ranger Battalions, but to sum it up once more (and I mean no offense to the pussies who hung out all day in the BAS drinking tea wearing sweaters), studs went to the platoons, and wussies went to the BAS. Sorry. Just the way I feel. I knew a lot of guys who worked in the BAS who were great guys, but most of them were not killers, and if you are going to dare the ultimate rite of passage, you want killers to your left and right, and so do the grunts in your platoon. If you go to a platoon, be a killer first and foremost, regardless of what anyone tells you otherwise, and be a great healer second. In the heat and fear of combat, you must gain fire superiority first, then maneuver, close and kill. Then you can pursue or consolidate, and that's when you get to be a healer: you at least need a little cover, a little time, and a little space, and the only way to get it is to seize it. But then again, if someone needs to be pulled to a position of safety from out in the open, guess what, stud: that's your job, too. You sling your weapon, grab your left nut, and then you do the MOH sprint, and you pray.

Combat is no time to learn that someone can't maneuver correctly , or lacks the training and confidence to even get their head up to put aimed fire down range. If you are a 91B in a Ranger platoon, you will do everything the grunts do and more, get the same Ranger tab they get, and it is likely that your time in Battalion will be a fond memory that will last you the rest of your days. If you are a 91C in the BAS, you will have a hard time getting trigger time or schools, you won't get to hump the boonies with a platoon, or work the jump clearing team, or any of those other things that make some men Rangers and some just support pukes. You might get a wide ass, and you may even grow a vagina (and let the record note that i love vaginas--on women). Again, if anyone reading this was a particularly hooah 91C, I'll apologize for my lack of sensitivity and tact. I was a Ranger medic in those days--not a diplomat (that came later, in SF). Now, I'm just a retired fuck, a former action guy, and anyone I offend can just turn the channel.





At this point, I think I have to say that 91B or 91C would be a miserable MOS to have in the event you failed or got injured at any point along the way. If you fail, you are going to a hospital, or some stupid unit in leg-land, or maybe the 82d....and for me, that would have been akin to death. You might get a lot of tail working in a hospital, but you will never scratch that itch that is provoking you to enlist for Rangers or SF rather than join ROTC.

I don't think either MOS is a good "fall-back" MOS, at least, not like one of the Intel MOS's. You can get some decent assignments, interesting work, whether you totally blow it, or get injured, if you are an interrogator or analyst. You may want to check and see if there are any CID slots at Regiment, as well.

Regardless, if you make it to Regiment as an Intel weenie....it will be juicy work. Keep in mind that you will have to get the SBI the hard way, with someone all the way up your butt, but if you have nothing to hide, good credit, and no criminal record, you'll be fine. You should still be able to beg for a slot to Ranger school, and it could be a decent lifestyle.

On the other hand, if you have some other reason, some deeper reason, for seeking to be a combat medic, then you should think long and hard, then blow me off, and probably pursue it. The last thing I will say is that the MOS of combat medic, 91B, in the Ranger Battalions, is a sacred charge. It is not for the meek, nor for the weak, and I mean that physically, but also morally and psychologically. Until you have had to wash the renching taste of the brains of your brothers from your mouth, or unstick your eyelids with your hands because you are drenched in their blood, you will never understand what it means to be a Ranger medic.

Guess I'll go watch some TV, now.

:)
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Ranger Classes 12, 13, & 14-81: 1st PLT, "Bad 'Muthers," Co A, 2d Ranger Battalion, 1980-84.
SFQC 4-84: ODA 151, Co B, 2d Battalion, 1SFGA, 1984-86. SF Association: M-10547.
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Old 9 October 2002, 21:59
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***91B is now 91W***
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Old 10 October 2002, 00:19
Sanjuro Sanjuro is offline
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Once again a NO shitter

Magician.
A double debt of gratitude on this end for your relentless no shitters.
I hear what you are saying about the pitfalls of 91w if I fail RIP, and the good points about Intel.
I have to admit, if I didnt want to put myself to the ultimate test and be with the shooters, I would definitly go for Intel. It really sounds interesting.

BUT I dont just want to have Interesting. I want the full challenge, the gutcheck, the total package complete with a double barrelled kick in the ass.
If i fail, then I just learned something about myself. BUt I wont know till I go.

I tried ROTC for 2 yrs at University. Was fun, lots of cute girls, but a joke if you wanted a challenge or to be a fighter. It was more like organized baby sitting. Hell on land nav the cadre drove around in a jeep and handed out candy (WTF?) as a motivator. O was thinking to myself, "is this how the army trains its future officer corps that will lead us into battle?"

Well I wanted no part. Thus my drive toward enlisted ranger or sf. I guess i want to be where the action is, in the dirt, with the grunts. still a lot to think about going 91w or not, dunno if it is for me. But I got some time to figure it out.

Time will tell.
Thanks
Sanjuro
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Old 10 October 2002, 05:21
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from what I have read on here it seems like most of the 18x washouts will be assigned to the 82nd airborne, since most will make it through jump school.
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Old 10 October 2002, 10:29
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sorry to say...

but that is exactly where a great part of our future officer corp comes from.

i hear you on the itch. I think when I was young, we all had something to prove, both to ourselves and to others, and that certainly played a role in volunteering multiple times to ultimately end up in Battalion.

I distinctly remember the day, however, when I looked in the mirror and realized that I was no longer seeking some form of self-confirmation. I was no longer in it for the money (such as it was), the job security (heh), or the college benefits. It was a pivotal moment in life for me, and I deliberately decided at that moment, and knew at that moment, that I was no longer a short-timer. I had become a professional soldier, and would stay in and do it forever, because I was pretty good at it (yeah, I was that arrogant), there was a lot more to do and learn and experience (got that right), and most of all, I would do it for my brothers. That was the ultimate reason. I wasn't going to leave them.

well, we all eventually left, of course, heading for SF or behind the fence. Very few of the Bad 'Muthers from that era just ETS'd and returned to civilian life. Very few. Some are retiring right around now, some have recently retired, and a few, a very few, are still doing the job as Sergeant Majors or O's.

one constant thing we all share: we still cherish the camaraderie we experienced in Battalion. I thought it would be the same, or even better, in SF. That's not the institutional culture there. It's a very different mindset. I have never experienced anything close to it in civilian life, professionally or personally, and anything I did in the military never quite compared.

In retrospect, I realize that in all the assignments I sought or accepted, I always hoped that there would be the same sort of camaraderie that existed in the Ranger Battalions. Never found it again. A good friend of mine from those days bounced between several units on both sides of the fence, even returning to Battalion as a squad leader, a very senior squad leader, after doing quite a bit of other very high-speed stuff. He confirmed the adage "you can't go home again."

I think that you can be a young man in a Ranger Battalion just once. You may stay, and stay for the duration of your career as an NCO, moving around the Regiment, doing your RI time, but eventually you may get fed up with the bullshit, as it tends to accumulate, or you notice it more and more, and there comes a time for most Rangers when it is time to move on. Sometimes the moment is triggered by injury, or a woman, or kids, or a killer opportunity somewhere. Sometimes, you just can't quite lead from the front as you used to, and believe you must. It can be real tough on your body. But a lot of Rangers of my generation moved on for greener pastures, or so we thought, getting fed up with this or that change of command and this or that policy. A lot of us thought we were moving on to bigger and better things. Sometimes it was even true.

But I think you can only grow up in the Rangers one time. If you leave and then return, it may not quite stack up to what you remember, or you may be expecting something that no longer is possible for you.

Of course, you will never lose touch with the men of your platoon, really. And when you see them again, years, even decades later, it will be as though you saw them just a couple weeks ago. You pick up right where you were. One of my pals was just over here a couple of weeks ago. Hadn't seen him in almost 20 years. Didn't matter.

I guess part of what I am getting at is that the itch is interesting, but you run the real risk of getting caught. You may wake up one day, look in the mirror as you shave, and realize that you have become a professional soldier. You could die. All of us here have a lot of dead friends. You also run the risk of growing old, and facing the challenge of doing it gracefully, with a little class, trying not to run on at the mouth (as I do here).

Anyway. I remember my years in 2/75, and I wouldn't trade them for anything, and that's both the good and the bad. I made friends there to last a lifetime, and a couple of enemies, too. Those years formed me. In SF, I was always "a former Batt guy," and Rangers often formed the bedrock foundation of talent on the teams. Rangers got spread around, to share the expertise in small-unit tactics and competence in the arts of infantry warfare. I might have never left SF if I could have stayed on a team heavy in former Rangers. In other places I worked, Rangers were sometimes poorly understood, with SF enjoying more "glamour," I guess, if that is the right term. In the Army, however, and I mean anywhere in the Army, Rangers are Rangers. It's a mafia, a brotherhood. Some units have a lot of former Rangers in the fold, and those units are truly great.

I wish you well. Before you leap into a romantic adventure of a lifetime, though, I would advise you one last time to look hard at ROTC. Yes, it can be very stupid. Even the Infantry school is pretty infantile, at times. But you go right into the pipeline for Ranger school, and Ranger officers have to come from somewhere. One of my best friends (former 2/75 enlisted) returned to Regiment after a tour in the 10th Mountain. Then he went back to leg-land on FLW for his first company command. He was in the chute to return to Regiment for a Ranger company, then got diverted. It's all good, but if you want to talk about a select few, there you go. Ranger officers....sometimes you wonder where the hell some of them came from. Other times, and I have been fortunate this way, you thank the Big Ranger for some of the O's in your chain-of-command, and you wish that they could stay forever.

I can't advise you not to heed the call of the wild, though. I definitely pursued it, living what I thought would be a life of adventure. Well, it was that. It was also a lot more, and I learned the hard way that glory is a very deceptive term. In some ways, I think it is for the old, for civilians, for those who are not fresh from the proverbial arena. You may get much more than you bargained for. I guess that's just part of it. I don't regret it.

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Ranger Classes 12, 13, & 14-81: 1st PLT, "Bad 'Muthers," Co A, 2d Ranger Battalion, 1980-84.
SFQC 4-84: ODA 151, Co B, 2d Battalion, 1SFGA, 1984-86. SF Association: M-10547.

Last edited by magician; 10 October 2002 at 10:35.
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  #16  
Old 10 October 2002, 11:33
XavieN XavieN is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Sweden
Posts: 325
Re: Last Questions

Quote:
Originally posted by Sanjuro
The other option being to put in 3 yrs, be at least E-4 and then apply for SF and you can come from anywhere in the army? Correct?
You have to be in a regular unit three years??? Please tell me it ain't so! Messing with my plans bro... (psst, Sharky, I almost have it figured out with all the legal mumbo jumbo... or so I thought)

-Martin
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  #17  
Old 10 October 2002, 12:44
HumanMule HumanMule is offline
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Join Date: May 2002
Location: Portland
Posts: 40
Re: Could use a no shitter

Quote:
Originally posted by Sanjuro
Here's the deal.


But I also figure that my chances of passing SFAS and SFQC would be more realistic with several years in a top unit like Rangers.

So I realize the whole question just reeks of wannabee, but considering my age I figured it was worth asking. I have read through most of the info on the site, seen the 5 week prep program for SFAS, and realize the odds against me. But I am already training hard and I guess at this stage that is all i can do.

THanks for any replies.
Sanju
Opportunity knocks; If the 18x option is still availible you would in my humble opinion be an idiot for passing it up. Oh yea! Don't be a weannie get yourself a "Green" beannie. Seriously, why not try; the worst that can happen is you will fail. Face your fear that you won't make it. The boys across the pond had a saying I always admired, something like "He who dares wins" or some such. The point is you will get to work with some fine soldiers even if you don't pass muster. Good Luck and Good Ruck. By the way my old ass is jealous but after the surgery I'm gonna see what my options are.

DOL
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  #18  
Old 10 October 2002, 13:07
18C4V's Avatar
18C4V 18C4V is offline
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Location: California
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Sanjuro

It was pretty recent for SFAS and SFQC. SFAS was 06-01 and SFQC was 04-01, Ranger school was 12-93. The cadre at the Q-course will expect you to perform. I went through the course as an E-6 11Bravo. Having a strong background in combat arms especially 11 series and being a victor will definately help you make it though the course. You will also be an asset to your team in SUT when you get there. On my team, there's only two of us (NCO's) who are former 11 series and I'm the only one Ranger qualifed. Hope this helps and good luck.
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  #19  
Old 10 October 2002, 20:53
Sharky
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Thumbs up Magician

Well said bro. Outstanding.
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  #20  
Old 10 October 2002, 22:22
Pops Pops is offline
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Location: Boondocked
Posts: 119
From experience I would NOT recommend Ranger Battalion for someone who is in their 30's. Don't get me wrong, I'm glad I did it (OSUT, ABN, RIP at 34) because it was a great experience. If you are in very good shape physically and (more importantly) have the mental strength and determination to see it through, then you will make it into the Regiment. But that's the easy part! Life in a Ranger Battalion can be, um, unpleasant. No matter what you think now, being subservient to 19 and 20 year old kids will get VERY old VERY fast. I am assuming that you will enlist as a "college" Spec4 (you would be a fool not to) and will more than likely have a high GT score. You will pay for this in spades and you will be resented by everyone else who "earned" that rank. You will also be addressed as "Private" and treated the same as an E-2 until you go to Ranger School and get your Tab (6-18 months after you get to Batt). If you decide that the Ranger lifestyle is not to your liking you will have a hell of a time getting out - and nobody likes a quitter. There is also a very good chance of being injured. Your body is just not as resilient at 34 as it was at 19 and you'll be asking it to do extreme things, not once, but over and over again.
If I were you I would seriously consider the REP63 route. Special Forces is a much more, shall we say, relaxed organization. Your education will be more appreciated there. Aside from the same physical issues that you would experience in Ranger Batt, your age will not be an issue. Trust me, when I PCS'd to Bragg from 1st Batt it was like a breath of fresh air! Also, if you go with the REP63 route you will keep your options open without going active duty for 4-6 years. If you don't make it you can serve out the remainder of your service obligation in a regular National Guard unit near where you live - one weekend a month, two weeks a year. That beats the hell out of Alaska or Korea! If you make it but don't like it you're still in the Guard so you don't have to live it 24/7 and you can hold down a regular civilian job. If you like it you can go AD anytime you want.
Feel free to PM me if you have more questions. Good Luck!
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