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Old 5 June 2018, 12:38
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Thumbs up June 6 is the 74th anniversary of D-Day

I did a copy an paste of this story to delete a bunch of junk with it. The story of a Veteran that was the pilot of a Glider

Veteran glided in behind enemy lines on D-Day

June 6 is the 74th anniversary of D-Day when we pay tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice at Normandy and honor those who lived to fight another day.
Read the story of one brave Veteran who was there.

June 6 is the 74th anniversary of D-Day when we pay tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice at Normandy and honor those who lived to fight another day. Here is the story of one brave Veteran who was there.
D-Day, June 6, 1944, the largest amphibious invasion in history. Over 150,000 American, British, and Canadian troops stormed the beaches of Normandy, but over 15,000 airborne soldiers dropped in behind enemy lines on D-Day. Most parachuted in, but over a thousand landed in Normandy inside gliders made of plywood.
Ninety-seven-year-old Millcreek, Utah, resident John “Jack” Whipple (pictured above) piloted one of the hundreds of gliders to set down in the fields of France on that June morning.
“After we landed we became infantry men.”
Tow planes delivered Jack and hundreds of other fearless flyers to the air over Northern France. Whipple was behind the controls of an Airspeed Horsa the day of the invasion.
“When we came over Utah Beach we received some ground fire,” said Whipple. “Then we flew over the Germans, and received a lot more fire.”

Long Description

Horsa Glider
Allied forces used two gliders in the invasion: the Waco CG-4A and the Airspeed Horsa. These were not the modern sail planes of today, but cargo and troop carriers. The CG-4 carried a pilot and co-pilot, 13 soldiers and their equipment, or a jeep and two or three soldiers.
Whipple’s Horsa carried him and co-pilot, a jeep, an anti-tank gun, four soldiers that morning, but the Horsa could also be configured to carry 30 soldiers and their gear. The total weight of a loaded Horsa hovered around 15,000 pounds.
After the tow planes cut the gliders loose, pilots had just moments to find their landing zone.
“The quicker the better,” said Whipple. “They were shooting at us – probably 3 to 4 minutes.”
To make matters worse, reconnaissance photos given to pilots were months old.
“The photos had been taken in January or February and the trees had no leaves,” Whipple recalled. When we got there, the trees were in full leaves and we missed our main check point.”

Jack Whipple, 1944
Losing altitude, Whipple picked a field to land in, but quickly realized it wasn’t big enough. He slammed the glider in to the ground, ripping off the landing gear. He then performed an intentional ground loop, digging one wing into the ground, thus slowing the glider and protecting the fuselage. A maneuver, which all these years later, Whipple points out, was authorized.
“We landed, didn’t hurt anybody or the major equipment,” he said.
At this point, his role shifted.
“Glider pilots did the flying, and right after we landed we became infantry men. Most glider pilots were trained as infantry men, but we couldn’t wear the infantry badge because we weren’t in their unit. We were still in the air corps.” Whipple said.
“We landed behind enemy lines. We had about perhaps five or six Horsa gliders. We got together after landing and helped those who were injured. We got attacked that night, but we were able to keep the group together and able to keep the enemy away.”

Troops aboard a Horsa glider Picture attached;
The airborne assault on German forces was a key part of the allied invasion.
“It made it easier because the Germans then had to fight both sides of a squeeze,” said Whipple, squeezing his hands together. “The people coming on the beach—and the airborne.”
And while hundreds of gliders may not sound like a lot, the gliders provided the airborne units equipment to combat heavy and mechanized infantry, and needed supplies to operate behind enemy lines. Whipple flew two additional combat glider missions—one in Holland and the final one as part of the Rhine Crossing.
After returning from the war, he earned his private pilot license, and flew all over the U.S., Canada and Mexico.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg John-Whipple-WWII-Veteran.jpg (30.5 KB, 114 views)
File Type: jpg Whipple-official-photo-350x456.jpg (15.4 KB, 116 views)
File Type: png troops-aboard-a-glider-350x291.png (202.8 KB, 111 views)
File Type: jpg gllider-in-museum.jpg (27.2 KB, 115 views)
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Old 5 June 2018, 16:17
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Carl Proffitt- King Co.,116th Inf Reg, 29th ID, Omaha-landed in the first hour, made it off the boat
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Old 5 June 2018, 20:52
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Let us never forget them.
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Old 6 June 2018, 06:51
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Greatest warriors, ever. God Bless them.
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Old 6 June 2018, 07:47
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Courageous men.

Glider pilots had to have been a little nuts - "OK son you're now a pilot in the US Army Air Corp, here's your plane; no engine, no armor, no guns, now go crash land behind enemy lines with zero chance of "rescue" until the end of the war."
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Old 6 June 2018, 08:32
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My uncle was a combat engineer with the 101st. He had been assigned to glider after freaking out about parachuting. He said after his first look at a glider, he begged to go back to a parachute unit.

They don't make men like these anymore.
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Old 6 June 2018, 08:43
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My grandfather flew his first of 36 missions on D day as the top turret gunner/engineer with the 493rd bombardment group/8th Air Force. To say that I idolized him would be an understatement. I'll never forget how he spoke about the men he served with. The greatest generation for sure.
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Old 6 June 2018, 08:57
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Uncle Kelso jumped in that day.

https://www.508pir.org/nott_notes/horne_k.htm

By the time I met him he was built like a 55 gallon drum with arms, legs, and a head!!!
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Old 6 June 2018, 09:48
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I was a young lad when I was cognizant of my WWII family vets, I am quite sad I did not have the forethought to get their stories on tape or paper. I think I had maybe 5 or 6 uncles or cousins (well, whatever removed) in WWII, and to a man they were studs, even to their deaths. They exuded authority and commanded respect.
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Old 6 June 2018, 13:59
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And all the movies I'll be watching in memory of this Greatest Generation.
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Old 6 June 2018, 14:44
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God bless them, one and all..
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