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Old 27 July 2016, 17:44
Dahn Dahn is offline
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Self defense

Need some advice, I have a 7 yr old GGS, he is into all sports, tumbling and now I have him doing push ups and pull ups. Several of each. Need to know if he can start self defense classes now, if so what type is recommended for someone his age.
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Old 27 July 2016, 18:28
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BJJ, yesterday.
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Old 27 July 2016, 19:28
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MG not sure what I am to do with BJJ yesterday, I'm
not very handy on here
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Old 27 July 2016, 19:29
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He just meant to get him started in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu as soon as possible.
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Old 27 July 2016, 20:27
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Ok, great I'll look into it tomorrow. My grandson (Other) is into BJJ and cross fit for several years. He should know which one in Amarillo is the best for GGS. Thanks for your help
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Old 8 September 2016, 15:43
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Know this is a bit late, but wanted to throw it out there for others who may be looking for options.

American Kenpo (depending on the school) and Counterpoint Tactical System (CTS) are other good choices.
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Old 8 September 2016, 17:41
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What is GGS
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Old 8 September 2016, 18:56
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Great grandson?
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Old 8 September 2016, 18:59
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Old 9 September 2016, 12:28
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This. BJJ is all good and useful for a ground fight, but in the street, you never want to take the fight to the ground. And since the fight typically starts from a standing position, boxing is far more practical. Strike, move, and break contact. BJJ is good to know, but boxing or muay thai is more applicable IMO.
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Old 9 September 2016, 12:46
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This. BJJ is all good and useful for a ground fight, but in the street, you never want to take the fight to the ground. And since the fight typically starts from a standing position, boxing is far more practical. Strike, move, and break contact. BJJ is good to know, but boxing or muay thai is more applicable IMO.


Having been in more than my share of street fights, both in my youth, and as a Cop/Fed LEO, every single one of them went to the ground. You may not WANT to take it to the ground if you prefer to box, but the reality is that is where it almost always winds up. While I agree that boxing is a very useful skill, I strongly disagree that it is more applicable to a street fight than BJJ. If all you know is boxing, A run of the mill BJJ guy is going to take you to the ground whether you like it or not.

Just my opinion, but it's based on a lot of practical and painful experience.
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Old 9 September 2016, 13:34
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I have been teaching Wing Chun Chinese boxing on and off for close to 17 years, and currently teaching again. Though not "technically" a ground fighting art, I have the students apply the principles to ground fighting/ground defense. And contrary to some contemporary thinking, traditional Wing Chun if trained right does have techniques to fight on the ground, get up from the ground, etc.

As Sharky correctly alluded to, you do not want to go to the ground - but a good chance you may end up there. We train to not go to the ground, end the fight and/or evade the fight on our feet - but you damn well had better prepare and train for the worst case scenarios - such as going to the ground. Traditional Boxing/Pugilism and Muay Thai/Khmer are good "arts" to learn as well, and can be very effective, but throw some real ground fighting survival skills in there. And what works on the mat for MMA/UFC competitions, may not be the best for when your survival is at stake and you have no rules and have to resort to "dirty" fighting.

In terms of your Grandson, I think just go look at various schools that cater to children. Look for a good instructor, not so much what "Art" it is.

Also, IMO, 7 years old is too young for any full contact sparring. Some arts, such as Wing Chun, I also have found out when I did a long long time ago teach a children's class, that that to have the motor skills to really learn the correct forms/positions need to be around at least 10 years old.

Just teaching a 7 year old confidence, situational awareness, improving they motor skills, and the fun/fitness they will have in a children's martial arts class though will give them a much better posturing in life.
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Old 9 September 2016, 13:57
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I will chime in as well. The knowledge of ground fighting is good to have, the problem I see with BJJ folks is that they want to go to the ground. I see a good stand up program that teaches both kicks and strikes as the preferred game while having an understanding of ground fighting tactics in your tool bag if you find yourself there.

CG
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Old 9 September 2016, 15:10
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I believe in the old adage that it's easier to wrestle a boxer than it is to box a wrestler.
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Old 9 September 2016, 15:13
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I started playing Judo at 4. By the time I was 12 I was competitive and routinely winning tournaments. I was also getting my ass beat on a regular basis by more than one person when I would throw someone, land on them and commence to test their pain threshold.

At 13 I got fed up with getting jumped by more than one person and started MT. Within three months I was throwing elbows, knees, proper punches and kicks. I stopped getting my ass beat as much when I would remodel someone's face with a series of strikes, especially when more than one person was involved.

Violence of action on your feet will trump strategically planning to submit an opponent on the ground.

My two beat up cents.
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Old 9 September 2016, 15:17
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7 years old - have him try all of them, do a couple months of boxing, a couple months of BJJ, a couple months of Karate, etc. At that age he isn't going to get proficient in any one until he can control his motor skills. Once he gets older he can specialize if he wants to. Good for you for taking an interest in his development and that is what it really is at that age. Hell, I've got twelve year old girls on my softball team that can barely tie their shoes, and none of them can remember the simple rule of running through first base:)
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Old 9 September 2016, 18:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leopardprey View Post
I have been teaching Wing Chun Chinese boxing on and off for close to 17 years, and currently teaching again. Though not "technically" a ground fighting art, I have the students apply the principles to ground fighting/ground defense. And contrary to some contemporary thinking, traditional Wing Chun if trained right does have techniques to fight on the ground, get up from the ground, etc.

As Sharky correctly alluded to, you do not want to go to the ground - but a good chance you may end up there. We train to not go to the ground, end the fight and/or evade the fight on our feet - but you damn well had better prepare and train for the worst case scenarios - such as going to the ground. Traditional Boxing/Pugilism and Muay Thai/Khmer are good "arts" to learn as well, and can be very effective, but throw some real ground fighting survival skills in there. And what works on the mat for MMA/UFC competitions, may not be the best for when your survival is at stake and you have no rules and have to resort to "dirty" fighting.

In terms of your Grandson, I think just go look at various schools that cater to children. Look for a good instructor, not so much what "Art" it is.

Also, IMO, 7 years old is too young for any full contact sparring. Some arts, such as Wing Chun, I also have found out when I did a long long time ago teach a children's class, that that to have the motor skills to really learn the correct forms/positions need to be around at least 10 years old.

Just teaching a 7 year old confidence, situational awareness, improving they motor skills, and the fun/fitness they will have in a children's martial arts class though will give them a much better posturing in life.
I couldn't agree more. I've been teaching the arts since the 80's and involved since the 60's. WC (when properly taught) is very capable of defending against grabs and takedowns (which the average BJJ guy is terrible at if traditionally taught) I like to start kids with boxing, judo and wrestling skills and build upon that base with Charles Nelson's Mongolian wrestling.

Last edited by BadKarma; 9 September 2016 at 18:15.
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Old 9 September 2016, 19:59
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As a young man, I did a little kenpo.

If I were the OP, "How do I vet a dojo/boxing/BJJ gym?" Would be a question...

S
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Old 9 September 2016, 20:03
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Deja vu...all over again.
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Old 9 September 2016, 21:05
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Originally Posted by RemTech View Post
7 years old - have him try all of them, do a couple months of boxing, a couple months of BJJ, a couple months of Karate, etc. At that age he isn't going to get proficient in any one until he can control his motor skills. Once he gets older he can specialize if he wants to. Good for you for taking an interest in his development and that is what it really is at that age. Hell, I've got twelve year old girls on my softball team that can barely tie their shoes, and none of them can remember the simple rule of running through first base:)
I really, strongly disagree with this. You don't learn much at all that sticks from 4 months of any martial art. It's going to confuse, confound, and frustrate,and they'll either want nothing to do with any of it, or they'll have an inflated opinion of their abilities, both of which are counterproductive.

IMO grappling arts are better for kids than striking, and judo, wrestling, or bjj would be ideal (in that order).
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