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  #21  
Old 20 May 2008, 14:55
PocketKings PocketKings is offline
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Don't discount ebay or other used sites. I got all of my bikes that way, except for the fully custom Guru. Bike geeks tend to buy way more bikes than they need and often unload 'outdated' 5 year old bikes for a fraction of the price. My road bike has full Ultegra/DA kit and all carbon fiber goodies and I got it, the shoes (that fit) plus a box full of spare stuff for under a grand. The kid I got it from worked at a bike shop and needed cash quick (busted for pot possession, big suprise, eh?). I've got well over 25k miles on the thing and it's still going strong.

Slowtwitch.com has a whole classified section geared towards rodies and tri geeks. I'm sure there are more.

Also, don't overlook off brands like Leader or the Performance. It'll get the job done and they have decent mountain bikes.

Just buy new spendex. Used is just nasty.
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  #22  
Old 20 May 2008, 17:41
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GPC GPC is offline
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Jamis Dakar for me, got it used in 05 ride it on dirt and pavement.Put a comfy seat on it regular pedals good to go.I use tubeless tires can be pricey when they wear out.
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  #23  
Old 20 May 2008, 18:12
grappler grappler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fofo View Post
That's something that the staff at whatever bike shop will address when you tell them you're in the market. For taller guys like us, (I'm 6'6) you might have some trouble getting a larger size frame bike, but it's certainly not impossible.
It took me a week to get a special order 22' frame, and it was well worth the wait, fits me like a glove.

What kind of MTB you lookin' for? Hardtail? Full suspension?
You're 6'6 and a 22'' frame fit you? I bet I could go off that...

I like the full suspension bikes. But I'm not going to be real picky... I just want a bike that I won't have to worry about slamming my knees into the handle bars.

I geuss I'll look up a bike shop in the area and pay em' a visit.
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  #24  
Old 20 May 2008, 18:27
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Ranger5280 Ranger5280 is offline
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Just remember that your torso or legs may be shorter or longer than a guy you're same height.

Check out a bike shop and try a bunch of different bikes out. You can buy off Craigslist/Ebay once you know what size in which brand fits you.
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  #25  
Old 20 May 2008, 18:54
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Schwinn w/2 speed kick back and cards in the spokes. I also use go-fast tape on the handlebars. :D
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  #26  
Old 20 May 2008, 19:24
number1 number1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grappler View Post
I'm glad someone posted this.

*** I'm 6'3, 225lbs. Can someone tell me what size mountain bike would fit me well?
i heard that the top of the frame, should around two inches from your junk when you are standing with the bike in between your legs. but again it also has to do with what you feel most comfortable riding on. many triathletes and pros alike have theirs custom fitted to their bodies, etc. that usually starts at about $3k.
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  #27  
Old 20 May 2008, 19:26
number1 number1 is offline
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does anyone ride custom fixie or single speed? im thinking about switching to one of those. i heard it makes your legs strong as hell.
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  #28  
Old 20 May 2008, 20:58
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low country low country is offline
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Originally Posted by number1 View Post
does anyone ride custom fixie or single speed? im thinking about switching to one of those. i heard it makes your legs strong as hell.
I ride a Gary Fisher 29er. 29" rims instead of 26. For a single speed or true one gear bike check out www.smokebikes.com They are made in Asheville,NC. Talked to a guy who rides alot and he said it is amazing to see guys on single gear bikes cruising in the mountains of NC flying by folks.
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  #29  
Old 20 May 2008, 22:53
number1 number1 is offline
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when you have a bike with gears its takes some mental power to figure out which gear to switch it to, if you dont get the right one, you have to switch it, this slows you down and doesn't allow you to focus as well. on a single speed bike theres no need to fuck with your gears, it gives you the ability to focus on the ride.
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  #30  
Old 20 May 2008, 23:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by number1 View Post
when you have a bike with gears its takes some mental power to figure out which gear to switch it to, if you dont get the right one, you have to switch it, this slows you down and doesn't allow you to focus as well. on a single speed bike theres no need to fuck with your gears, it gives you the ability to focus on the ride.
I just found this article. Converting an extra Fuji bike I already have seems like a good idea.
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  #31  
Old 21 May 2008, 00:36
Typhoon Typhoon is offline
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I got into cycling because I could no longer run due to a very bad back. A couple decades and 50 pounds ago I averaged upwards of 80 miles a day. My longest ride was a point to point solo trip that covered 140 miles of flat, rolling, and hilly terrain in 6 and a half hours. I was a pretty strong racer, and actually managed to place in a couple of decent races. Once in a stage race I was a part of a group of riders who were clocked at 66 mph by police radar on a steep downhill stretch.

I owned three bikes, all 55cm frames: An Olmo, a Rossin, and a Ciocc. I was able to get very good deals on all of those frames from riders that I knew. The Ciocc was seriously badass. It had a very tight 39.5 inch wheelbase, and it would turn on a dime if you just tilted your head over the handlebar drops. I had it loaded up with a Campagnolo Pro groupo, although the Super Record performed better and was less expensive. I sold the nearly new Ciocc back to the guy I bought it from because my back had gotten too bad to cycle any distance.

I kept multiple bikes because I needed to have a back up in case of a crash. I crashed in races a few times, and broke my collarbone once. I saw a fair number of expensive bicycles end up as a pile of twisted metal. The worst race for crashes used to be the National Capitol Open, which ran around the Capitol Mall in Washington DC. The riders used to call it the "National Crashpital Open", and the three times I raced it there was a bad crash every time. I felt lucky to have escaped intact.

Quote:
when you have a bike with gears its takes some mental power to figure out which gear to switch it to, if you don't get the right one, you have to switch it, this slows you down and doesn't allow you to focus as well. on a single speed bike theres no need to fuck with your gears, it gives you the ability to focus on the ride.
Generally it is better to be undergeared than over geared. If you are riding on a lighter gear you can always accelerate by increasing your rpm's; but if you're overgeared acceleration is slow and it can cost you. I once lost three places at the finish of a 50 mile race in Jockey Hollow, NJ because I overgeared by one sprocket. The race finished on a steep hill, and I couldn't accelerate for the sprint fast enough.

Most novice riders don't realize that the optimum gear for training and cardiovascular conditioning is one that you can push at 100 rpm. I am totally out of the cycling scene now, but back in the day all the best riders used to spend the winter months riding in a fixed gear. I'd ride a 42x18 gear for 40 to 60 miles. At my best I could maintain a 25 mph pace in that gear for a fair distance without going into serious oxygen debt. Some guys I rode with went even smaller, riding a 39x18 or 42x19 gear.

It is easy to set up your road bike for a fixed gear: Just build a beefy rear wheel (you'll need it as you cannot avoid potholes as well), and if you've got the money use a track hub. Remove the front and rear dérailleurs. Buy a single track sprocket and use a track chain to run your drive train to the small front chainring. If you've got a good budget you can use track and chainring. I always used my road model pedals with a road chainring that I just used for fixed gear riding (the track chain tends to put more wear on the chainring). Be careful riding a fixed gear, and take the time to get used to it. If you aren't accustomed to riding fixed gear and try to suddenly slow down or stop you'll go head over heels.

In cooler weather months it is definitely an advantage to ride on a fixed gear. In addition to fitness benefits it also prevents stressing out the knees from too much pedal pressure. However during the warm weather months if you are going to ride with a stiff wind, or are going to hit the hills, you are much better off with a variety of gears you can select from a freewheel hub.

I miss riding a bicycle and wish that I could still do it...
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  #32  
Old 21 May 2008, 01:03
NightLandNav NightLandNav is offline
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Softride Rocket TT7, Zipp Wheels, Look pedals. Three other road bikes, (2 Treks & Cannondale CAAD 6) but the times aren't even close.

Several Mtn Bikes, but my favorite is a 6yo GT "I" Drive. It just won't die.

Great way to stay in shape. ...just get the right saddle.
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  #33  
Old 21 May 2008, 12:50
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Ranger5280 Ranger5280 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offcamber View Post
575? I have an 06 575 that I built up, raced and had stolen in May of 07. I recovered it back in December after finding it advertised on Craigslist and busing the thief. It's nice to be back in the Tribe. I couldnt afford to buy another one if I hadn't recovered mine.
I'm Old School and ride a stifftail...YETI FRO.


The YETI Tribemeet was in Fruita, CO this past weekend. I was unable to attend but a buddy of mine did and said it was outstanding. He also said he preferred Fruita to Moab. I'll have to see for myself.
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Last edited by Ranger5280; 21 May 2008 at 18:43. Reason: adding Tribemeet part
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  #34  
Old 25 May 2008, 22:44
cuda-dude cuda-dude is offline
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Light bikes are for sissy's

I ride an 70's Pugeot steel frame that is slow and heavy. The good news is that my legs look great.:D

Looking for a Cannondale tri bike sometime this year.
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  #35  
Old 26 May 2008, 00:31
number1 number1 is offline
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i just got a jamie roy iro single speed. all white frame with everything else black. its pretty sick.
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  #36  
Old 26 May 2008, 09:14
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Frog Frog is offline
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Been racing road bikes off and on for 25 years. Bikes need to be fitted:

Measure your inseam. This is best done barefoot. Stand against the wall and put a book between you legs so it pressed right up against your pelvic bone. Make a mark with a pencil on the wall along the top of the book. Measure the distance from the floor to the mark in centimeters. Step2
Use your inseam measurement to get a rough idea of your road bike size. Multiply your inseam by .65. This will give you a good estimate of you road bike size for bikes measured center to center. Thus if your inseam is 86 cm, you will fit a 56cm road bike (86 x .65 = 55.9). Note that many road bikes are measured center to top. To determine how to fit these bikes, multiply your inseam by .67.
Step3
Subtract an additional 10cm and convert this measurement to inches to get your mountain bike frame size, roughly. Thus, if you fit a 56cm road bike (c-c), you will fit a 46cm - or an 18" - mountain bike.
Step4
Consider top tube length. In many ways, this is the most important aspect of sizing a bike. Two 18" mountain bikes may have different length top tubes. Or a 54cm and an 56cm road bike may have the same length top tube. Given the same top tube length, the bigger bike may be more comfortable in that it will allow you to get the bars up a bit higher.
Step5
Know that women have longer legs and shorter top tubes than men. Unfortunately, most bikes are designed for men, and women often have a hard time finding a bike that will fit them well. Luckily, some manufacturers have begun to make women-specific models.
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  #37  
Old 26 May 2008, 09:30
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MikeC2W MikeC2W is offline
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I have a Gary Fisher Hardtail and a Santa Cruz Heckler, I ride not as much as I wish I could.

This year I'm looking at buying a road bike, doing the Pan Mass Challenge in August.....although I'm currently broke like a motherfucker and might just end up doing it on my Heckler.
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  #38  
Old 26 May 2008, 10:45
Dirtpuppy Dirtpuppy is offline
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Alright, a bike thread! I own a Trek Fuel 90 for mtn and a QR Seduza that I just bought last weekend, getting ready for my first road tri, I usually do Xterra events. Ive had the Trek since 04 and its still going strong, Ive only had to replace the chain and a few cassettes.
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  #39  
Old 26 May 2008, 10:54
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Olive Drab Olive Drab is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PocketKings View Post
Don't discount ebay or other used sites. I got all of my bikes that way, except for the fully custom Guru. Bike geeks tend to buy way more bikes than they need and often unload 'outdated' 5 year old bikes for a fraction of the price. My road bike has full Ultegra/DA kit and all carbon fiber goodies and I got it, the shoes (that fit) plus a box full of spare stuff for under a grand. The kid I got it from worked at a bike shop and needed cash quick (busted for pot possession, big suprise, eh?). I've got well over 25k miles on the thing and it's still going strong.

Slowtwitch.com has a whole classified section geared towards rodies and tri geeks. I'm sure there are more.

Also, don't overlook off brands like Leader or the Performance. It'll get the job done and they have decent mountain bikes.

Just buy new spendex. Used is just nasty.
+1. Get a general idea of what size you need from doing your homework. Then buy the terrible, 2 season old bike, from a guy on slowtwitch for a song, then go to a reputable shop for a proper fitting which may include some part swapping. I nabbed a kestrel talon on there with full ultegra setup and less than 1000miles for a sweet price. fit is super important or you will not be putting all your power where it needs to go in addition to possibly causing pain to your knees and other joints. You may also want to look into Speedplay Zero pedals (road) or Speedplay Frogs (mountain) as they provide a lot of float compared to eggbeaters, spds, look, dura ace, etc.
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  #40  
Old 26 May 2008, 11:09
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oh yeah, dont forget to buy powercranks.
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