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  #41  
Old 26 May 2008, 13:55
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I've been running a bike shop for the past 8 years and riding since I was a wee sprog.
Road, mountain, choppers, fixed gears, pretty much everything.
Frog just gave an excellent guideline on sizing above.
My tip is, find a good bike shop run by cool people that ride.
Go there for just about everything and they will take care of you.
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  #42  
Old 26 May 2008, 14:58
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Originally Posted by Typhoon View Post
I got into cycling because I could no longer run due to a very bad back.

Most novice riders don't realize that the optimum gear for training and cardiovascular conditioning is one that you can push at 100 rpm.
Would the 100 RPM be suggested on a stationary bike too? My back is also screwed up, but I can go for a half an hour on a stationary bike if it has a back rest. My pace has been around 85 RPM with about 50% (random) resistance dial in.
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  #43  
Old 26 May 2008, 18:16
JRB11 JRB11 is offline
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Shiver me timbers! Just when I had a picture in my mind of the typical right-leaning posters here (think Boss, from Cool Hand Luke, complete with mirrored shades and a pack of Winstons), now I have to picture nightlandnav in spandex/lycra! Who would have known? Damn, i wish some of you lived in Wa., and we could hit the road or trails, no politics allowed. Happy trails/roads.
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  #44  
Old 26 May 2008, 22:56
Typhoon Typhoon is offline
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Would the 100 RPM be suggested on a stationary bike too? My back is also screwed up, but I can go for a half an hour on a stationary bike if it has a back rest. My pace has been around 85 RPM with about 50% (random) resistance dial in
Yes, if you can hit that comfortably. It took a lot of work for me to get up to the 100 rpm level, but it was definitely worth it. Recall that the spinning classes that were all the rage a few years ago were based on riding a stationary bike at high rpm's. I am not sure if you can ride at a high pedaling cadence if you are using a back rest, but for improved cardiovascular fitness it is worth a try. You can build up your cadence by doing long interval training at 100 rpm's, or shorter intervals at or near your maximum cadence. Some of the track riders in my day could hit ridiculously high cadences for 15-20 seconds...
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  #45  
Old 26 May 2008, 23:30
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To train to race, I monitor my cadence, not my MPH. Maintain a constant >90 RPM regardless of slope - thats why you have gears to shift to. Get a speedo that gives you RPM.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Typhoon View Post
Yes, if you can hit that comfortably. It took a lot of work for me to get up to the 100 rpm level, but it was definitely worth it. Recall that the spinning classes that were all the rage a few years ago were based on riding a stationary bike at high rpm's. I am not sure if you can ride at a high pedaling cadence if you are using a back rest, but for improved cardiovascular fitness it is worth a try. You can build up your cadence by doing long interval training at 100 rpm's, or shorter intervals at or near your maximum cadence. Some of the track riders in my day could hit ridiculously high cadences for 15-20 seconds...
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  #46  
Old 27 May 2008, 09:06
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Roadbike is an Aluminum Cannondale R400.

Tri. bike is an Cervelo P2k.

I try to ride the road bike earlier in the year and on the trainer. Ride the Cervelo once some "base" fitness has been gained. The Cervelo is a primarily used for triathlons so the aero position can be murder on the lower back. However, once I start swimming on a scheduled plan during the year I always seem to get over the lower back pains.

Preparing now for Ironman Florida in November.

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  #47  
Old 27 May 2008, 16:21
T-Rock T-Rock is offline
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Preparing now for Ironman Florida in November.
I would love to be going with you guys…

You better qualify or at least smoke that OB Doc…:D
(In my best Obama voice) - “Yes You Can” :D

Good Luck !
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  #48  
Old 27 May 2008, 20:12
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T-Rock-time to ride! Appreciate the vibes man.

Rubicon
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  #49  
Old 27 May 2008, 21:52
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Originally Posted by SOTB View Post

The price of gas has exceeded my fear of dying at the hands of a 3-toothed mullet-head driving an 84 Nissan Sentra....
That's nothing compared to the 19 year old blonde bimbo doing her make-up, while holding a latte in one hand, cellphone cradled between head and shoulder and driving her M3 to Junior College. It is shocking to see the imbeciles on the roads these days...


As for Bikes, to get back to the thread's intended purpose, I am currently riding an old, beat up hardtail Trek. Will be upgrading shortly to a nice Cannondale or Litespeed.
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  #50  
Old 28 May 2008, 03:51
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Originally Posted by JRB11 View Post
Damn, i wish some of you lived in Wa., and we could hit the road or trails, no politics allowed. Happy trails/roads.
Randall Hale lives in Olympia, WA. Retired 1st GRP guy who helped build a lot of the original mountain bike trails on Okinawa. Rides like a fiend, and chews Copenhagen while doing it.

I'm a regionally ranked gravity racer (DH and Super-D) in the PNW region. Whenever I am stateside I ride about 4-5 times a week. If you are close to the Seattle/Bellingham area and want to try and get a ride in, I'll be back around July, send me a PM.

PS: I fart on politics.
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  #51  
Old 28 May 2008, 09:55
PocketKings PocketKings is offline
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Originally Posted by Olive Drab View Post
oh yeah, dont forget to buy powercranks.

HA. Or Newtons. Or a Speedsuit. And your seat's too high.

Freaking triathletes.
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  #52  
Old 28 May 2008, 23:40
Typhoon Typhoon is offline
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To train to race, I monitor my cadence, not my MPH. Maintain a constant >90 RPM regardless of slope - thats why you have gears to shift to. Get a speedo that gives you RPM.
Good advice.

Bikewrench, back in my day the most precise way to fit a bicycle to a rider was with a FitKit. Are they still on the market and used by top end bike shops? Are there any newer products on the market?

Quote:
Freaking triathletes.
You could always tell who the triathletes were when you saw them way up the road because they'd be bent over in the praying mantis position with the time trial bars and pedaling a giant gear at a low rpm...
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  #53  
Old 29 May 2008, 18:23
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Calfee LeMond

I cycled a bit in the Corps out in California in the late 80's - Early 90' and would ride PCH and the Via Ducts all the way up to Anaheim every week. I was on a local cycling team in 2003 and had a lot of fun racing that year. Was putting 250 - 350 miles per week in the saddle and it was like a drug. Riding every day and racing on the weekends. My wife hated it. I sold my bike in the winter just before starting work contracting. I miss cycling bad. Was fortunate to have not been involved in any bad crashes during races and only one incident while riding a paceline with a noob. Only thing hurt was his feelings and some skin off my ass and shoulder.
Had a Calfee "LeMond" Carbon with Campy Record Carbon. Bike was a 58cm that weighed 16.2lbs. It was faster than me. Here's a pic.

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  #54  
Old 30 May 2008, 14:12
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Bikewrench, back in my day the most precise way to fit a bicycle to a rider was with a FitKit. Are they still on the market and used by top end bike shops? Are there any newer products on the market?
Yeah, they are still around, but there are several other systems out there. It really comes down to the experience of the fitter as well. We use several systems that don't have brand names or expensive 'tools' to use, though I would love a sizing bike. [WE are going to get one soon.]

If you have a good shop they will be able to set you up on the bike comfortably. If you have injuries that need to be taken into account or other problems. You should talk to a physical therapist who specializes in bicycle fitting.

Some types of discomfort you should just ride through and get your base miles in. Most of use are familiar with these, cardio, sore butt etc.
Some discomfort means that you have to change something quickly before you injure yourself. Knee pain!

Talk to someone who has experience.
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  #55  
Old 1 June 2008, 23:33
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wouldn't you know, i was just in a nasty bike accident. im mostly ok, i had a dilocated finger that i put back into socket myself, a lot of road rash, and my emotions were bruised, lol. i was going to fast around a corner that had no bank. bike slipped from under me. please, everyone be careful and wear a helmet. i was glad afterwards that i did.
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  #56  
Old 2 June 2008, 03:50
Archer Archer is offline
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biking for dummies - Help!

Need some advice for a not-too-expensive beginner bike that can do light to medium trail and road riding. Knees have finally gone and the Doc says start biking and swimming for fitness. Got any good recs for a guy on a budget, but still wants a sturdy, hard riding bike?
THX
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  #57  
Old 2 June 2008, 13:06
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archer View Post
Need some advice for a not-too-expensive beginner bike that can do light to medium trail and road riding. Knees have finally gone and the Doc says start biking and swimming for fitness. Got any good recs for a guy on a budget, but still wants a sturdy, hard riding bike?
THX
Can you give some specs as to what you want? Like, do you want a hardtail? Full suspension? Don't care? Disc or calliper brakes? What is your price range?
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  #58  
Old 2 June 2008, 16:50
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Originally Posted by JRB11 View Post
Shiver me timbers! Just when I had a picture in my mind of the typical right-leaning posters here (think Boss, from Cool Hand Luke, complete with mirrored shades and a pack of Winstons), now I have to picture nightlandnav in spandex/lycra! Who would have known? Damn, i wish some of you lived in Wa., and we could hit the road or trails, no politics allowed. Happy trails/roads.
Whatever turns you on. :D

Seriously though, six months out of the year I wish I lived in Wa.

In the summer here, it's too hot on the desert floor for me to even want to go out on an all day outing. Fortunately we have the high country but I find the trails (where I go) too rugged for anything but hiking.
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  #59  
Old 3 June 2008, 00:44
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Originally Posted by grappler View Post
OK, cool...

I just figured someone would be able to say, 'you're such and such height, this size should fit you...'
Bike fitting is a precise science, involving just about every dimension and dozens of variables. Frame dimensions, seat height, handlebar height, stem length, crank lengths, and more besides. To really ride efficiently, you should have the bike shop set up your bike to your exact dimensions. A good pro bike shop will have the experience and equipment to do it. It's worth it to pay for this service if you intend to ride any distances. Your knees and back will thank you.

I have a 20 year old Eddy with Campy Super Record.
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  #60  
Old 3 June 2008, 12:41
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I’ve been riding about 5K miles a year for the past 3 years on a Volae Expedition http://www.volaerecumbents.com/2007/...editionpro.php

Most Saturday mornings I’ll be riding the rural back-roads of the Florida panhandle and Alabama border. We have plenty of route variation, with a good amount of fairly short climbs up to around 6-8% grade, and lots of rollers, probably the only area in Florida that does. I really enjoy doing 50-100 mile distances, and if my schedule would settle, I’d like to get into some randonneuring. I’ve also been commuting a 34 mile route to and from work, about 2-3 days a week for the same few years.
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