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  #21  
Old 6 July 2019, 14:22
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TFG, you know me only to well
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  #22  
Old 7 July 2019, 05:53
Forestboy Forestboy is online now
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I’ve raised one, since retiring, to butcher. It was a minimum of 15 minutes every day after I weaned him. For 18+ months. Currently I have one at my uncles that is in with his herd, much easier.....for me. Concur with what everyone has said, not a fire and forget critter. Worming, vaccination, which you should do, unless you like enriching the local large animal vet. Then fly spray/control. Round bales are great if your cows can eat them before they rot. My single steer couldn’t so I had to feed him square bales all winter. Goats might be a better idea, though they will still need daily tending to. They eat everything and are expert escape artists.
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  #23  
Old 7 July 2019, 10:48
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I am no expert but have been working farms since I was a kid, mostly helping family. The only folks making money off of beeves or dairy around here this year are the banks, the vets and the implement folks. I have not made a decision yet which are the most destructive to fences , they all could give a rat's ass about barbed wire!
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  #24  
Old 7 July 2019, 17:15
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Goats might be a better idea, though they will still need daily tending to. They eat everything and are expert escape artists.
In my experience, herding cats and understanding redheads can be marginally less frustrating than trying to maintain a hardened perimeter around goats.

DaveP
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  #25  
Old 10 July 2019, 21:53
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USDA veteran-oriented assistance; more farming, but
might be useful to some--

https://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/612...g-agriculture/
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  #26  
Old 11 July 2019, 08:06
Shark0311 Shark0311 is online now
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But Iím my quest to find a business that is scaleable and a little hands off I looked at cattle. Iím still interested in anyoneís in put.
If you are looking for a long term investment and already have the land then I would look at planting marketable trees e.g. black walnut. Keep the costs as low as possible and don't do anything elaborate. I wouldn't plan on getting rich off of it but it could be something to keep in your back pocket over time.

Mineral rights can be lucrative depending on the location.

If you like driving a tractor you may be able to make hay and sell it to your neighbors with horses, cattle etc. It's pretty easy.

These are a few hands off investments that might work for you. Anything that involves an animal involves work.
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  #27  
Old 11 July 2019, 22:59
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Trees in this area, central Alabama were on a 25 year cycle. You also have to be careful about who you get to cut and clear the land and replanting. We just let most of ours go back to natural growth and i sell firewood from time to time when I clear out food plots. Lately it has been taking dads out to let their child hunt for the first time or just go sit and watch nature.
Had a coach and his daughter go last season and she sat and took pictures all day. never shot a thing in the woods. She shot when she got back to the house.
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  #28  
Old 11 July 2019, 23:45
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Have cattle returned 7% per year on average for the last hundred years?
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  #29  
Old 11 July 2019, 23:48
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Hardwoods are going to be tough to actually see the profit from in your lifetime unless you are starting with some established timber. They just grow too slow. West of the Cascades has around a 35 year rotation due to the precipitation, but here in the intermountain west your looking at 40 or more likely 50 years. One option is silvopasture where you start trees at a wider spacing then once established run grazing animals under them, giving you some quicker profits while the trees mature.

If I was in CA and had some extra money to invest I would look at bees to rent out to the agriculture industry there. I have a neighbor that runs down there with semi trucks of bees all the time. As I understand it they make more on the pollination with the honey as a byproduct.
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  #30  
Old 12 July 2019, 10:02
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USDA veteran-oriented assistance; more farming, but
might be useful to some--

https://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/612...g-agriculture/
I may look into this to get my own hay equipment.
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  #31  
Old 12 July 2019, 11:08
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We had cows when I was younger. Stupid fucking animals. Definitely not fire and forget. Vet was constantly at the farm with them, they were always getting into trouble somewhere. My mom broke her arm chasing one of them out of an irrigation ditch.

Having lived with chickens, pigs, cows, horses, and ducks, I'd say go with pigs. They eat anything (including dead hookers, and since we don't have our cesspool anymore you need some way to dispose of them), they don't require much space, they're smarter than cows, they'll piss off your Muslim neighbors, and they turn into bacon.
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  #32  
Old 12 July 2019, 11:52
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There is quite a bit of walnut forests around here for profit , but they have been established for quite a while now. I am not sure of the age they cut these at , but am guessing at least 30-40years before they cut some. They grow freaking fast around here, as I used to cut a lot for firewood and I would always be amazed at the size of the growth rings on walnut , cherry and elm.
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  #33  
Old 12 July 2019, 11:59
Shark0311 Shark0311 is online now
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I may look into this to get my own hay equipment.
Buy used.

Round bales are easier to gather but you need a bobcat or front end loader with an attachment to move them and they roll down hill. The positive side is that you need less labor to gather and stack the bales.

You also need a good weather window. If it rains after you cut then you can loose the harvest. Moister content is key before bailing. Once mold sets in it's game over.

The basic operation looks like this. Cut, ted, rake, bale, store.

Common replacement parts are teeth, belts, pins and consumables such as bailing twine (square bale).

I'm no expert on this by any means. I've just helped out on the farm occasionally and these were my observations. Before making a purchase I would do a lot of research.
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  #34  
Old 13 July 2019, 14:36
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All I know is they taste good. Thank you farmers. And...a full grown mean ass bull can outrun a 13 y/o. Yep.
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  #35  
Old 14 July 2019, 00:39
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Buy used.

Round bales are easier to gather but you need a bobcat or front end loader with an attachment to move them and they roll down hill. The positive side is that you need less labor to gather and stack the bales.

You also need a good weather window. If it rains after you cut then you can loose the harvest. Moister content is key before bailing. Once mold sets in it's game over.

The basic operation looks like this. Cut, ted, rake, bale, store.

Common replacement parts are teeth, belts, pins and consumables such as bailing twine (square bale).

I'm no expert on this by any means. I've just helped out on the farm occasionally and these were my observations. Before making a purchase I would do a lot of research.
Sadly, I am painfully with familiar with rain and hay. I have been putting up horse hay for 16 years. I put up 616 square bales and 65 round bales today (The power of good fertilizer). I buy most of my farm equipment used, not sure if the program will let you buy used. My paradox is I only hay about 28 acres so spending that much money on the equipment may not make sense. I do it mostly for the Schedule F on the taxes and end up getting about $2k worth of hay each year for free. Like raising cows though, its not just mow it and bale it by any means.
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Last edited by The Fat Guy; 14 July 2019 at 09:37.
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  #36  
Old 14 July 2019, 08:18
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Man...I've been in some pretty hot places in this world--but I can honestly say there's no place hotter than a barn loft, stacking hay with no breeze under a smoldering tin roof. I don't miss slinging squares, and knowing how to stack those fuckers on a hay wagon is a soon to be lost art.
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  #37  
Old 14 July 2019, 09:40
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Man...I've been in some pretty hot places in this world--but I can honestly say there's no place hotter than a barn loft, stacking hay with no breeze under a smoldering tin roof. I don't miss slinging squares, and knowing how to stack those fuckers on a hay wagon is a soon to be lost art.
Yesterday was brutal (but not as bad as last year) I am in the final stages of a bout with pneumonia and still outworked the kids. I still have about 60 bales to put in the barn.
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  #38  
Old 14 July 2019, 11:02
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Yesterday was brutal (but not as bad as last year) I am in the final stages of a bout with pneumonia and still outworked the kids. I still have about 60 bales to put in the barn.
If you ever need a hand just say the word...I'll sling and stack squares for family members, or a brother--other than that. Anything to do with hay lofts and squares deserves a full on 'NOPE'...in pure wildman style for cause and effect.
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  #39  
Old 14 July 2019, 13:00
schibbs schibbs is offline
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Originally Posted by Mingo Kane View Post
Man...I've been in some pretty hot places in this world--but I can honestly say there's no place hotter than a barn loft, stacking hay with no breeze under a smoldering tin roof. I don't miss slinging squares, and knowing how to stack those fuckers on a hay wagon is a soon to be lost art.
I have not been where some of you studs have been , but first started bailing hay in 6th grade, and not the small squares they use now on dairy farms, the 60 plus pounders. It kicked my ass, the hay mow sucked roids and I believe it was my first experience with heat injuries and dehydration.... I got better and stronger after that, and nobody around here would no how to stack wagons by hand anymore...
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  #40  
Old 14 July 2019, 14:39
Shark0311 Shark0311 is online now
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Speaking of horses. My dad and I had to stitch a cut over the weekend after the fourth. I received a call today that the wound is now healed and he had hard time locating it. Mission accomplished!

It's very difficult to get a vet to come out for a horse in his AO. They make more money on cats and dogs without worrying about getting kicked so you learn to do it yourself.
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