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  #41  
Old 17 September 2018, 10:53
Devildoc Devildoc is offline
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As a lowly nurse, some subspecialties are more deployable than others. Critical care nurses, ED nurses, enroute care nurses. I did more deployments as a nurse than as a FMF corpsman. I imagine with physicians it's the same way.
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  #42  
Old 17 September 2018, 12:44
notdeadyet notdeadyet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ussfpa View Post
Physicians owe 2 years for every year of school. Say you do your own undergrad (Pre-med)...$100K, then you have to be accepted into med school. Once accepted, they put you through 4 years of med school (you now owe EIGHT) and whatever your residency roulette gets you (3-8 years) - one for one for residency so another 3-8. SO on the hook for 11-16 as a Dr.
Not quite.

The main scholarship for physicians for the Army is HPSP, which is the one the OP's daughter would likely be looking at. This is a 1 for 1 obligation (one year of service for every year of scholarship). She would get free tuition, books, and a living stipend of about $2200/month. She would owe four years of active military service.

But...

She would also need to do a residency of 3-7 years (vast majority are 3-4 years). These are typically done as a full-time O-3 military resident (drawing full O-3 salary). Better pay than you get as a civilian resident. But your payback clock is not yet ticking. You also accrue obligation on a 1:1 for every year you take of residency.

Then...

Once you finish residency, you enter payback. Your payback obligation is your med school obligation (4 years) OR your residency obligation (3-7 years), whichever is longer (you actually pay back both, but they are paid concurrently).

Not a bad gig. Whether it's financially a smart move depends a lot on which specialty you go into. For the more lucrative ones, you'd be better off paying back the loans yourself given the difference in pay between military and civilian. There's also the issue of being required to do a military residency. They aren't bad, but aren't on par with civilian offerings at better programs.
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  #43  
Old 17 September 2018, 12:47
notdeadyet notdeadyet is offline
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Last piece, OP- NP, CRNA, PA, or MD/DO: None require a BA in biology or chemistry. All require good grades and basic pre-requisites. I advise undergrads and tell all the pre-health folks that your choice of major is FAR less important than how well you do in your classes. So just make sure she works hard at whatever her passion is and as long as she does the prereqs, she'll have the possibility of going down any of these career paths. All are good, all have drawbacks for the reasons mentioned above.
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  #44  
Old 17 September 2018, 12:50
Devildoc Devildoc is offline
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Originally Posted by notdeadyet View Post
Last piece, OP- NP, CRNA, PA, or MD/DO: None require a BA in biology or chemistry. All require good grades and basic pre-requisites. I advise undergrads and tell all the pre-health folks that your choice of major is FAR less important than how well you do in your classes. So just make sure she works hard at whatever her passion is and as long as she does the prereqs, she'll have the possibility of going down any of these career paths. All are good, all have drawbacks for the reasons mentioned above.
NP and CRNA require BSN. There are some weird programs that are RN (2 year ADN)-DNP but they are few and far between.
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  #45  
Old 18 September 2018, 16:58
justamedic justamedic is offline
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PA schools also require a bachelors degree. Hard sciences preferred, but every program will have its own requirements.

Another option is to just pay for school yourself or through federal loans or private loans. The income from said professions will be enough to pay back whatever debt you have in time. It’s just a matter of how much debt to want to accrue (ex MD>PA).
THEN join the military (active/reserve/guard) if that is where your heart is or wants to be. Depending on the current needs when you apply, you could get some pretty sweet deals and have your pick of the lot.
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  #46  
Old 18 September 2018, 17:37
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Further, a degree in sciences is a marketable degree to be used in Forensics, Chemist, Pharmacist. Far better than a liberal arts, English etc degree.

A plan must be there if she decides she does not like health care.
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  #47  
Old 18 September 2018, 19:06
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Originally Posted by Expatmedic View Post
Further, a degree in sciences is a marketable degree to be used in Forensics, Chemist, Pharmacist. Far better than a liberal arts, English etc degree.

A plan must be there if she decides she does not like health care.
This like a Mofo!

Quote:
Originally Posted by leopardprey View Post
So my 17 year old neice now is seriously talking about becoming a PA. Her motivation: very high salary and less time in school than being an MD or Vet she had talked about.
I question that (Bold) as motivation. Hopefully just an oversight on your part about what her initial motivations were.

I remember when I chose to go to nursing school. I was chuffed when I found out they made decent money. Money was the last thing on my mind.

Further. Don't discount Nursing should she choose it.

When my wife quit travelling last year her thru-the-door-buy-beans-with-it-money was $7k per Month & less than half was taxable. Which ain't slouchy for an ADN, aka 2 year degree.
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  #48  
Old 18 September 2018, 20:37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notdeadyet View Post

Your post...
My information is clearly dated from before I retired. My apologies to the OP and the others I may have provided information to that is not up to day and therefore incorrect and inappropriate.

Thank you for the clarification and correction.
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  #49  
Old 18 September 2018, 21:01
Jong Jong is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devildoc View Post
NP and CRNA require BSN. There are some weird programs that are RN (2 year ADN)-DNP but they are few and far between.
I might be wrong but I think he is referring to the Army programs for NP and CRNA.
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  #50  
Old Yesterday, 08:23
Devildoc Devildoc is offline
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Originally Posted by Jong View Post
I might be wrong but I think he is referring to the Army programs for NP and CRNA.
Then they absolutely require a BSN.
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  #51  
Old Yesterday, 15:33
CAVmedic CAVmedic is offline
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I know of at least one associates RN-NP school. I'm pretty sure there's a few more around Ohio.

This would benefit anybody that just wanted to get working and earing a paycheck while finishing grad school part time.

http://www.otterbein.edu/graduate-sc...p-adn-msn.aspx
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  #52  
Old Yesterday, 16:08
Devildoc Devildoc is offline
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Originally Posted by CAVmedic View Post
I know of at least one associates RN-NP school. I'm pretty sure there's a few more around Ohio.

This would benefit anybody that just wanted to get working and earing a paycheck while finishing grad school part time.

http://www.otterbein.edu/graduate-sc...p-adn-msn.aspx
Those are awesome programs, that were not around when I went through nursing school. Part of the challenge is, some facilities won't hire NPs unless they have the DNP (stupid-ass, useless degree). Most private practices or groups will hire MSN-prepared NPs. But yeah, RN-to-MSN (NP) is great.
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