Go Back   SOCNET: The Special Operations Community Network > Areas of Expertise > Languages

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 22 September 2012, 06:26
Hot Mess's Avatar
Hot Mess Hot Mess is offline
In Vino Veritas
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Where you vacation
Posts: 10,327
Quizlet

I'm making flash cards for Indo and stumbled on quizlet.com. It's free and you can make as many cards as you want. I am making them on my computer and then you can move them to your iwhateveryouhave. You can do everything you do in rapid rote (flash cards, spell the word in either language, move the cards around, keep score, ect.)

I am studying for the DLPT vs. trying to actually learn the language, so I have to learn specific nouns and phrases, that is why just not any resource will work
__________________
Come on boys, you got to do it right, pray to the moon in the middle of the night
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 17 March 2013, 10:14
12Foxtrot4 12Foxtrot4 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: California
Posts: 157
Rosetta Stone:
This program has some significantly strong and weak points. My organization uses this and owns a number of transferable licenses. I used it for both Arabic and Farsi. For comparison, I use my experience at Ft Bragg taking Thai and testing at 2/2. Based on this experience, here are some high and low points:
1. Cost: quite expensive when joined with number 2
2. Proficiency: matching RS to your own level is tricky if you aren't starting from scratch. Since this is a sequential program, under or over shooting your start point can lead to frustration with number 1 above.
3. Subject matter: this is geared for daily, civilian usage. As such, unless your daily activities include riding busses and buying persimmons, it might be better as an aid rather than a core method for DLPT/DLAB. See number 1 above.
4. Time consumption: This system takes regular, systematic, use. I devoted 2 hours per day for 3 months. Luckily, my pre-deployment activities supported this training.
5. Effectiveness: My experience was good with each language. I deployed with about a 200-300 word spoken vocabulary and much better listening comprehension. I did not focus on written or reading, but was minimally functional in both areas. Ten and two years later with disuse, I have not retained much proficiency and only minimal vocabulary.
6. User friendliness: excellent. This is not a DLI or Ft Bragg product and it shows. Two hours was not nearly as painful or or grinding as language lab.

I hope this helps and I appologize for the length of the post.
12Foxtrot4
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 17 March 2013, 13:45
crapstash's Avatar
crapstash crapstash is offline
Divides by zero
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Probably Oconus
Posts: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12Foxtrot4 View Post
Rosetta Stone:
This program has some significantly strong and weak points....
Thanks for that. I was recently looking at options for a Spanish program and decided not to go with Rosetta based mostly on online reviews and co-workers. Rosetta Stone is far and away the most advertised program out there I think. But thats what makes me skeptical.
I went with Fluenz. It's similar in price. There are 5 CDs in total along with some online flashcards and pod casts. Im halfway through the first CD so far and Im pretty impressed.
This is my first language course other than High School French, so take it for what its worth. I'd be interested to hear if anyone else has used Fluenz yet.
BTW, the chick that teaches the Spanish course that I stare at for an hour each day, is pretty damn hot. That helps.
__________________
No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow.
Lin Yutang
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 25 March 2013, 00:50
hemingway hemingway is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 2
In addition to formal mandarin chinese instruction I've tried a few other things to mix it up. some of my tried and true:

FluentU.com - Learning platform is cultural immersion, uses your preference for types of movies and cultural references to teach you Chinese.

http://english.cri.cn/08chinese/ - a chinese government funded site and invaluable resource.

http://english.cri.cn/chinese2007/ch...esson01/1.html - part of crienglish this is an actual free online textbook. Instructs with pronunciation, pinyin and stroke order for characters

lonely planet CD - for passive learners who can absorb knowledge via listen and repeat. This is part of the way that children learn their native languages and is useful for most people. Repetition is necessary for retention.

Google Translate Ipad/Android app - for quick translation of character text you find online etc

Pleco Ipad app - A dictionary that includes pinyin, characters, english and common expressions/work usage.

Hope this helps someone. Mandarin is a tricky language and it takes alot of effort...almost full immersion I would say. Anyone with any tips or just interested in chatting about the language can PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 1 October 2013, 13:54
18C4V's Avatar
18C4V 18C4V is offline
BTDT
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: California
Posts: 2,565
Special Operations Forces Teletraining System. You'll need your CLPM manager to approve it, I just enrolled into my language.

Pros...Free...classes for all levels.

Con....my class meets three days (Tues/Wed/Thurs) a week for 2 hours a day so you'll need to keep to the schedule. You'll need a fast download speed so wireless may be questionable.

You can miss some classes (TDY, etc) and my class runs from Oct to Feb (2014). Hopefully my DLPT score will increase!!!
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 21 October 2013, 17:25
swimr235 swimr235 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: South Florida
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18C4V View Post
Special Operations Forces Teletraining System. You'll need your CLPM manager to approve it, I just enrolled into my language.

Pros...Free...classes for all levels.

Con....my class meets three days (Tues/Wed/Thurs) a week for 2 hours a day so you'll need to keep to the schedule. You'll need a fast download speed so wireless may be questionable.

You can miss some classes (TDY, etc) and my class runs from Oct to Feb (2014). Hopefully my DLPT score will increase!!!
Im registered to SOFTS, I have yet to actually use it. I have resgistered for classes but have never received confirmation or responses to any inquiries. Sucks becuase Im sure once I crack the code and get in itll be great! But so far, no joy.

- nick
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 25 November 2013, 13:57
swimr235 swimr235 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: South Florida
Posts: 20
I'd like to update my previous post. I am currently in the process of updating my entire agencies "trusted sites" policy to add SOFTS and DLI. The issue was not the site but my agencies policy against certain sites. I've submitted an internal memo to rectify the issue so that my SOFTS colleagues and I can use these sites to learn and maintain our proficiencies. SOFTS is an excellent resource.

- Nick
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 28 November 2013, 03:37
Soutpiel's Avatar
Soutpiel Soutpiel is offline
Orbi tertio spumae
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Cape Town/Mozambique/Other
Posts: 294
I use android apps by Robert Theis. Currently using Swahili and Portuguese. There are a whole bunch of them covering a wide range of "work" subjects. Basic, aircrew, public affairs, civil affairs, medical, naval.
I find them a great help.
__________________
"A healthy dose of well managed paranoia can be your friend"
"The meek shall inherit f#ckall"
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 24 January 2015, 23:17
Eden Eden is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 17
Another translator that I have found very useful is at:

http://www.online-translator.com/Default.aspx

It seems to be better than most with German and Russian (I haven't really used the other languages it supports).

As for language courses, I would have recommended TellMeMore.com, but unfortunately, Rosetta Stone just bought them out. I hope RS doesn't gut them. I'm currently working on TMM's German course (which I bought before they were bought out).
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 30 January 2015, 06:32
MindBlown37F MindBlown37F is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Fort Bragg
Posts: 50
I've recently just discovered the Babbel app (iOS). There's plenty of different languages to choose from. I'm currently using it on my depolyment (Africa) and it works just fine.

Pros: Can pick and choose between levels, self paced, full variety of vocab, accurate speech recognition, can be accessed offline.
Cons: $9.99/month (this may not be a con to some) but i dont mind if it helps raise my DLPT
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 15 June 2015, 00:33
npm npm is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Arizona
Posts: 7
Duolingo is another great, free resource for those interested in learning Spanish, French, German, Brazilian Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Irish, Danish, Swedish, Turkish, Norwegian (Bokmål), Ukrainian, or Esperanto. They seem to add new languages to the program about once a year or so.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 7 November 2016, 05:13
Dangercon Dangercon is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Everywhere
Posts: 64
Anyone have any thoughts on Pimsleur method? I had a good discount code and did about 30 lessons of Finnish. The Finnish girl I was dating at the time said I sounded decent. But was wondering if that was anecdotal or if the Pimsleur method was actually founded.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Our new posting rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:17.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Socnet.com All Rights Reserved
SOCNET