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  #1  
Old 26 April 2018, 08:58
Jim1348 Jim1348 is offline
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Post Retirement Work In Insurance Investigations

I have retired from traditional cop work and I am looking at post-retirement work. I saw some ads for insurance investigation work. I am interesting in hearing from anybody that is doing, or has done, this type of work. What are some things I should be looking at in this sort of thing?
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  #2  
Old 26 April 2018, 09:42
Agoge Agoge is offline
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Depending on the type of insurance, suspect there will be a lot of surveillance time - especially for workman's comp type cases. Many of the others are fairly documented "white collar" type investigations where the information is already there, you simply have to put it all together in a report form and conduct a few interviews.

Workmans Comp, staged accidents, and unemployment insurance fraud are a majority of the cases you would get. None of them are hard, IMO.
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Old 26 April 2018, 10:10
ExSquid ExSquid is offline
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Guy I knew who did it (years ago) spent most of his time sitting in a car behind a video camera. I would suspect in this day and age there might be a little social media investigation as well, ie. looking for a guy out on workman's comp yet posting videos of himself on Facebook playing basketball in the park.

x/S
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  #4  
Old 26 April 2018, 10:16
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cj cj is offline
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Check out IASIU: http://www.iasiu.org/

They are an association for internal insurance SIUs. I used to be a member years ago. Check and see if they have a local chapter and reach out to the folks involved. Linkedin might help. Alternatively, there are vendors that provide insurance fraud investigative services to carriers. They don't pay nearly as well and you'll usually end up doing the stuff the internal folks don't want to do like, like surveillance.

The vendors run the gamut of decent to horrible. The employee turn over is significant because the good ones are always looking to go internal for the pay and job security. Plus, typical vendors usually rely too heavily on their performers, and thus, they get run ragged and burned out in order to keep happy clients. Years ago carriers used to have an informal process for outsourcing fraud investigations whereby adjusters had the leeway to use local or regional vendors. However, about 15-years ago they turned to a formal centralized process that now requires vetting vendors and that heavily favors larger established firms like Covent Bridge Group, Roman, and CVI.

If you end up at a vendor, you'll likely be doing surveillance and your typical workday starts around 5:00am and depending on the case will go 8-10 hours. Also depending on where you live and where your target is located and moving about, you will have considerable drive time. Regardless about 99% of the time you'll be seated in a car with a cell and camera.

It's not a lot of fun. When I got out of the army that was my undergraduate and grad school job. May not be the type of work for a retiree looking to make a little extra cash because you'll need to be on your game to last more than 2-weeks. I say this because you'll need to be highly alert for your entire shift or you'll constantly loose your target, which will upset your supervisor and inevitably lead to termination.
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Old 26 April 2018, 13:36
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A friend of mine retired from State Farm's SIU after a long career, mostly dealt with arson cases, with a fair amount of theft/fraudulent claims thrown in.

He got around, people were always trying to get over on the insurance. Many times it came down to being in debt, they'd stage a heist of their boat/car/motorcycle and try to collect the insurance while they also unloaded the item that was supposedly "stolen".

He enjoyed his work, he got to be pretty good at reading people. And he took a lot of pictures.
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Old 27 April 2018, 10:45
Fu King Lawyer Fu King Lawyer is offline
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Jim,
I retired as a LEO a few years back. Was contacted by USAA SIU. I wasn't looking for work, but was fascinated to learn that USAA contracts out most of its SIU to a private firm - I'll dig around and see if I can find the name, but if you are a USAA member, you can navigate their system if I don't find the info fast enough.
USAA has changed a lot, but for the most part if you did affiliate with their SIU, you would be dealing with military, a/d or retired, as well as their dependents.
The investigator I talked with talked about pay and benefits which then sounded pretty good. But even if you live adjacent to a military installation, you work for them and you will on the road, a lot.
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Old 27 April 2018, 14:34
MizzouMP MizzouMP is offline
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My Cousin retired from Chicago PD and moved to Vegas. His first post-retirement job was with Geico.

He said that Gieco treated him well, gave him all the training he needed to get thru the way they do things, paid him very well, and gave him the perks of company car/cell/laptop/etc... to get the job done.

He worked for them for 2 years before going to something else due to the fact they had him humping more than he wanted to for a retirement job. He was always out working cases and would travel to help other areas as needed.
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Old 27 April 2018, 14:45
Jim1348 Jim1348 is offline
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Post Retirement Work In Insurance Investigations

Quote:
Originally Posted by cj View Post
Check out IASIU: http://www.iasiu.org/...
Checking out IASIU now!


Quote:
Originally Posted by MizzouMP View Post
...His first post-retirement job was with Geico...
Thank you for the replies. As a matter of fact, Geico is one of the places that I have applied to.
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  #9  
Old 29 April 2018, 19:27
Jim1348 Jim1348 is offline
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National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) Special Agent

I also ran across openings for Special Agent at the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB). One the one hand, I do recall its predecessor, the National Auto Theft Bureau (NATB). On the other hand, I never really had any interaction with the now National Auto Theft Bureau (NATB). Does anybody here know much about the NATB?
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Old 30 April 2018, 14:19
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They sound like an Interpol for insurance investigators.
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Old 30 April 2018, 14:40
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Massgrunt Massgrunt is offline
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That's not a bad analogy.
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  #12  
Old 30 April 2018, 15:18
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Blackjack78 Blackjack78 is offline
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I know some real good and accomplished former LE that work for them. I never heard them complain.
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