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  #61  
Old 25 September 2008, 21:40
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One of the fundamental truths of the universe is that there isn't anything that cannot be improved with the addition of pirates, ninjas, midgets or monkeys.

For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil. Romans 13:4
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  #62  
Old 26 September 2008, 08:08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lspg2219 View Post
Graphic illustration of the importance of our topic.


Reflecting on Family Safety Following Florida Tragedy

By Dave and Sgt. Betsy Smith
Street Survival Seminar Instructors

On Tuesday, January 30th, 2007 a convicted felon and murder suspect, Lionel Sands, and his companion Daniel Brown apparently stalked and gunned down Mellie McDaniel, the wife of Jackson County Sheriff John McDaniel as she headed home from the grocery store. Mrs. McDaniel was able to contact her husband via radio phone to advise him she was being followed; as he called for assistance and told her not to go home he heard her scream. The first responding deputy Harold Michael Altman, was also murdered. The sheriff and other units responded, killing both suspects.

Deputies found ammunition, latex gloves, bleach, vinegar, handcuffs, duct tape, and trash bags inside the killer's vehicle. In addition, both killers wore disguises which included a wig and a glued-on mustache, but their ultimate plan died with them.


Shortly after this incident, we received a call from a good friend and fellow police trainer, Greg May, coordinator of Public Safety Education at Gulf Coast Community College in Florida. Greg is also a police officer with Panama City Beach Police Department, and more importantly, a husband and father.
The home of Jackson Co. (FL) Sheriff John McDaniel where his wife Mellie, a deputy and two suspects were murdered.(AP Photo/Steve Cannon)

He'd already been receiving requests for information and training for police families, and knew that Calibre Press would be a good resource. The Jackson County case hit Officer May especially hard as Deputy Altman was one of his recruits. We decided that this tragic case brings up issues we need to talk to our own families about, no matter how difficult or uncomfortable it may be. Thanks to Officer May for his inspiration and assistance.

When we talk about and train for "off duty survival," we have to include our family members in many aspects. Let your family know that you have an obligation to keep yourself, your family, and the community safe on or off-duty. More importantly, teach them that as members of a police family, they also share this obligation.

Talk to them about good v. evil, about being part of a "warrior family,' and how they can help you AND each other. Keep it simple, keep it age appropriate, and talk about this more than once! These discussions should be a regular part of your life as a crimefighter's family.

The Internet has made our personal information more accessible than ever, including our home addresses, relatives, even the vehicles we drive. Tell your family about the dangers of Internet chat rooms and to NOT give out any information that may give their true personal information or indicate they have law enforcement in the family.

Teach them not to give out personal information when shopping, in casual conversation, and when meeting new people. Make sure they are very cautious about revealing your identity as a police officer.

Teach your spouse or partner to use your off duty weapon, and as your kids grow and mature teach them also. It's a good idea to begin teaching your kids (and spouse or partner) that sometimes bad people choose to do evil and good people sometimes have to stop them, which may include you or members of your family...THEM!

In other words, teach them to be warriors! Don't hide or downplay what you do, and what you (or they) may face someday. If you empower your family both mentally and physically, they will be less vulnerable to victimization. Our spouses and kids are usually much stronger than we give them credit for (after all, they live with us, don't they!?)

Here are a few additional "quick tips" to tell them during your family discussions:

• Be aware of other people attending to you or your children, vehicle, your movements

• Make sure "911" and your jurisdiction's dispatch center is programmed into your cell phones

• If you're being followed, go to a crowded, busy place (such as a busy gas station or store, the mall, local police or sheriff's department, courthouse), identify specific locations in your own area that may be "safe zones." DON'T GO HOME...this is especially difficult for youngsters to understand, because home is a "safe place" for them, so help them to understand why they shouldn't just go home.

• NEVER allow yourself to be taken into a vehicle or building. Learn tactics such as drop and roll under vehicles, yelling, screaming, hitting, biting, running in the opposite direction, whatever it takes to get away.

• If you suspect you are being followed or targeted, trust your instincts and take appropriate action. Believe in your gut instincts!

• Make sure you know how to find your location, including using mile posts along the highway, to tell help exactly where you are.

If you don't live in your own jurisdiction, make sure you and your family know the local cops; take them to the local police station to visit (bringing some cookies or a dozen doughnuts couldn't hurt!), have them meet the dispatchers, desk officers, and the officers who patrol your neighborhood. Take advantage of the child safety and personal safety courses taught by your own agency or another one; we often neglect to get our family members involved in our own crime prevention programming.

As we talk about in the Street Survival Seminar, you must teach your family some of your own police tactics, including "cover and concealment," "crisis rehearsal" and "tactical breathing."

More importantly, teach them the "warrior mindset" that is so vital to survival. Teach them to protect themselves, to "keep fighting no matter what!"

Our hearts go out to the families of Mellie McDaniel, mother, grandmother, and loyal cop's wife for so many years, and Deputy Harold ("Mike") Altman, one- year veteran of the Jackson County S/O, son, husband, step dad, and now fallen hero. Honor the sacrifice of these two people by sharing their story with your own warrior family.

There are still some of you that, even after reading this, will still believe that you should maintain a "wall" between your family and your job. As this example proves, now more than ever, we can't afford that luxury. Bring your family into your world, our world, and teach them to be part of our own warrior family of crimefighters!

Here are some great resources that Calibre Press recommends to help in teaching your family to stay safe:

The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us from Violence
By Gavin De Becker

Raising Kids Who Can Protect Themselves
By Mike and Debbie Gardner

Street Survival Seminar (spouses are encourage to attended)

About the authors

Former police lieutenant Dave Smith developed the popular "Buck Savage" survival series videos and was the lead instructor for the original Calibre Press "Street Survival" seminar from 1983 to 1985, helping to develop the popular "Tactical Edge" book. He served as the Director of Education for the Enforcement Television Network, general manager of Calibre Press, and is now the lead instructor of the "Street Survival" seminar and a regular Newsline contributor. He can be reached at thebucksavage@aol.com

Sergeant Betsy Smith is a 27-year veteran of law enforcement, currently serving as a patrol supervisor in a Chicago, IL suburb. Betsy hosted various programs for the Law Enforcement Television Network and served as a content expert until joining Calibre Press in 2002. A graduate of the Northwestern University Center for Public Safety's School of Staff and Command, Betsy is a police trainer, author, and instructor for the Calibre Press "Street Survival" seminar. She can be reached at betsybrantner@aol.com
This was graphically illustrated to me a few days ago. I noticed a motorcycle following me, but didn't accept it as a problem until I actually turned down the street I live on. I kept going and finally lead him down a cul de sac where I confronted him at gunpoint. He claimed he was following me for cutting him off (which if it happened, I was completely unaware of). I didn't have anything to arrest the guy for, and I am still trying to run him down to make sure he's not connected to anyone. But, the fact that he didn't seem super surprised when I identifed myself a a federal agent, has made me really start paying attention even more since then, including having to warn my family to be on the lookout for similiar events or activity.

Occupational hazard, but not one you ever get used to.
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  #63  
Old 26 September 2008, 12:01
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Perhaps we could make this, and the rookie tips stickies?
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"....As far as "rights" are concerned... I look at them this way. I don't tell you what church to go to, and you don't tell me what kind of firearm I can own." GROG

If gun control laws controlled crime, we wouldn't need cops.
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Finally, I believe that punishing lawful gun owners by creating new, more onerous laws, and restricting Constitutionally guaranteed rights, when we already don't enforce the tens of thousands of gun laws we have on the books, is like beating your dog because the neighbor's dog shit in your yard.
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  #64  
Old 26 September 2008, 16:45
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Quote:
Perhaps we could make this, and the rookie tips stickies?
I second that motion.
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One of the fundamental truths of the universe is that there isn't anything that cannot be improved with the addition of pirates, ninjas, midgets or monkeys.

For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil. Romans 13:4
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  #65  
Old 26 September 2008, 17:33
PocketKings PocketKings is offline
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This thing is chock full of goodness.
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  #66  
Old 27 September 2008, 09:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Group9 View Post
This was graphically illustrated to me a few days ago. I noticed a motorcycle following me, but didn't accept it as a problem until I actually turned down the street I live on. I kept going and finally lead him down a cul de sac where I confronted him at gunpoint. He claimed he was following me for cutting him off (which if it happened, I was completely unaware of). I didn't have anything to arrest the guy for, and I am still trying to run him down to make sure he's not connected to anyone. But, the fact that he didn't seem super surprised when I identifed myself a a federal agent, has made me really start paying attention even more since then, including having to warn my family to be on the lookout for similiar events or activity.

Occupational hazard, but not one you ever get used to.
At least you picked up on it, many officers don't. I preach to my family all the time about situational awareness...I was proud of my sister last week. Pervert was following her around strip mall area, she picked up on him and took appropriate actions (even got his plate number).

I've seen two officer safety alerts within the last month about criminals using commercial databases to identify officers and our personal information. Maybe we can insert some language into the bailout bill to stop this???
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  #67  
Old 27 September 2008, 13:33
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Here's one I had passed on to me...

Sanitize your wallet. Don't carry your badge, ID card, gas card, basically anything that can ID you as an LEO in your own personal wallet. If you do carry these items off duty, get a second wallet (on of the badge carrying types) to place them in, that way if you have to give up your wallet for some reason (ie a robbery), you don't get made.

A corollary to this one is this: If you do carry a badge, ID card, etc. off duty, carry a gun. There was a case years ago (in Texas, IIRC) where an off-duty Deputy was dining with his wife. He had his badge in his wallet, but wasn't carrying. Diner gets robbed at gunpoint, BG's demand everyone's wallets. They see his badge when going through his wallet, and put one in his head.
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  #68  
Old 27 September 2008, 13:37
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Another example, with more detail. I'm sure there are others, but you get my point.

http://www.odmp.org/officer/14952-de...ne-daniel-york

Quote:
Deputy York and his fianc้e, who was also a deputy with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, were off duty in a hair salon when two suspects entered and ordered everyone to the ground. While one suspect covered the customers the other collected everyone's wallets and purses. The two suspects discovered Deputy York's badge and immediately shot him in the back of the head as he lay on the ground. Deputy York had not resisted and remained calm throughout the entire robbery trying to keep others from getting hurt.
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Challenges: I expected times like this- But I never thought they'd be so bad, so long, and so frequent.
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  #69  
Old 9 October 2008, 10:29
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Never be caught unarmed

All of this is good stuff, and I believe that anyone who is serious about their work does most of this, but also never, ever go out in public un-armed. Several years ago I arrested a jackoff for shoplifting. While I was cuffing him up he got cute and tried to buck, not a problem for me with him, as he realy did not know what he was doing. Flash forward s few months. I am shopping with my then two year old daughter for my wife's x-mas gift. I knew exactly what I wanted and where it was. I took my daughter and put her in a cart, and went into the store, I'm in there for a few minutes when I lock eyes with ....guess who. Yup out on bail before trial. Anyway, I should have left because I had left my gun in the car. I don't even know why I did that as it was a very stupid thing to do. Anyway I guess he wanted payback because as I was walking down an aisle he, and three of I guess his friends start following me, and I can glance back and see them doing the "perp head bob". You know the one where they look to see if anyone is around. I figgured great I'm gonna have to fight all these ass hats and probably get cut or worse. I did have a knife, but I happened to be on a hardware aisle. Perps are so stupid. I grabbed a framing hammer and turned on them and walked toward them. I like to think that my willingness to defend myself, and my kid, and put the attack on them was clear, as I remember trying to put on my best "come and get it" face. They all turned and walked away. Moral of the story...if they really wanted me, they could have had me. If they had a gun, I was fucked before this even started. Now I ALWAYS carry. If I can not by a private establishments rule to exclude firearms, I do not patronize that place. This drives my wife nuts as I do not go to certain places on vacation, ie. Six Flags, Disney Land, or what have you. I may be paranoid, but after that x-mas.....

Last edited by Fox; 9 October 2008 at 10:32. Reason: I'm dumb
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  #70  
Old 16 October 2008, 20:34
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For the family, especially the spouse, when you say "Wait for me in the car" that means "Go to the car, lock the doors and I'll be out when this gets dealt with"
It does not mean, "Let's discuss this", "I'm not done shopping", "Why, there are still things that I want to get before we leave".
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  #71  
Old 26 October 2008, 19:46
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Originally Posted by grog18b View Post
#1-- #9--Keep a weapon in your vehicle-- Coming home to a dark house is much easier if you are well armed. Coming home and finding a bunch of dudes trying to get your gun safe out the front door will require some sort of firepower. Personally, I keep a SKS with folding polimer stock in my truck with enough ammo to handle having to fight my way back into my house... Or fight my way out of an ambush. If you are in LE and think people don't ambush cops, you are kidding yourself. Think of all the very bad people we piss off every day...
:D

Done. I recently purchased a new AK-47 and have it strategically located in my personal truck along with 600 rounds of ammo loaded in magazines. This is in addition to my G27 which goes with me everywhere while off-duty. I'm looking for a readily identifiable POLICE mesh vest now as I can only imagine how a responding officer would react to a crazed gunman firing up a bunch of taxpayers with an obviously "non-police" weapon.

Have any of you given much thought to hotel/travel PERSEC? I am on the road a lot and think about it all the time. I won't even take a shower in a hotel room without my Glock by the sink. Now that I am in a suit most of the time I have taken to wearing an ankle safe that includes a Surefire 6Z light, an extra G23 mag, and a pair of titanium handcuffs. At some point in each of your LE careers you are going to need restraints while off-duty. No Sharky, this has nothing to do with hotel room gymnastics :D.
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  #72  
Old 26 October 2008, 20:11
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Originally Posted by DuckMarshal View Post
Have any of you given much thought to hotel/travel PERSEC?


In a former life I lived in Hotels 1-2 nights a week for years. Without going into details, I will tell you that due to the fact that these doors must be ADA compliant they are childs play to open from the outside by someone who knows what they are doing, regardless of what type of lock is in use (stripe card, Ving card etc). There are, however, some gadgets that will help such as these...

http://studenttravel.about.com/od/wo...roomsafety.htm

I used the one at the top of the page. Easy and cheap.

My boss says paranoia is a survival skill. I agree to a certain point. Finding a good balance is key.
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Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.
In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.
Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.
It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate
I am the captain of my soul.
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  #73  
Old 26 October 2008, 20:12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckMarshal View Post
No Sharky, this has nothing to do with hotel room gymnastics :D.


What you do with your prisoners is none of my business. :D
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Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.
In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.
Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.
It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate
I am the captain of my soul.
-Invictus
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  #74  
Old 26 October 2008, 20:22
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lspg2219 lspg2219 is offline
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I bought the Pacsafe Travelsafe to lock my valuables up in the hotel room.
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  #75  
Old 26 October 2008, 20:26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharky View Post
In a former life I lived in Hotels 1-2 nights a week for years. Without going into details, I will tell you that due to the fact that these doors must be ADA compliant they are childs play to open from the outside by someone who knows what they are doing, regardless of what type of lock is in use (stripe card, Ving card etc). There are, however, some gadgets that will help such as these...

http://studenttravel.about.com/od/wo...roomsafety.htm

I used the one at the top of the page. Easy and cheap.
I keep two 99 cent rubber door stops in my travel gear.
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  #76  
Old 6 January 2009, 15:59
SARGG SARGG is offline
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I read a thread like this .......... and don't feel quite so strange about the Socom 16 @ Glock 23 I always have in my personal vehicle.
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  #77  
Old 7 January 2009, 09:47
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I have now decided to construct 2 "go bags" for our 2 POV's. My plan now is to put flex cuffs, flashlights, spare Glock mags, and a trauma dressing in each.
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  #78  
Old 14 January 2009, 12:18
tnkspe119 tnkspe119 is offline
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Originally Posted by DuckMarshal View Post
I have now decided to construct 2 "go bags" for our 2 POV's. My plan now is to put flex cuffs, flashlights, spare Glock mags, and a trauma dressing in each.
My father once told me, " It's better to have and not need, then need and not have." I have lived by that mantra to this day. Thanks, this thread is awesome.
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  #79  
Old 22 January 2009, 09:26
Brian K. Sain Brian K. Sain is offline
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Just because you aren't paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get ya.

That said ... pretty tough on PERSEC with a squad sitting in your driveway ...

Just sayin' ...
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  #80  
Old 22 January 2009, 17:34
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Teach your wife and kids some simple self defense methods, like carrying her keys between each finger so she can use them as a weapon. Cellphone with 911 programmed by speed dial, watching their environment and not leaving the store until the wallet/money is securely back in the pocket or purse.

Pepper spray is still a good investment for those who can't or won't carry.

Alarms are only good when they are set and that means every time even if it is a quick trip.

Bandits are now jacking the front doors by the jambs (tool on both jambs and it screws or jacks open), so that fortified deadbolt is totally useless. Motion sensors are critical and may scare them off, but the perps of today are brazen and will grab whatever they can because they know they have a few minutes before anyone will respond.

I don't know how many times I could have stolen a wallet out of a purse in a shopping cart. I usually talk to the 'not so smart woman' and ask her to quit baiting the bandits.

I have been thinking of some barbed wired fencing, a gun tower, and some effective doggies....but I figured I would do this a step at a time and hope that the homeowners association will not notice.
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