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  #421  
Old 28 October 2014, 18:26
Stretch Stretch is online now
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leopardprey,

Thanks. I will keep that in mind.

I know a gal that went through more than one pair when she through hiked the AT. I don't know which model she had. I remember the picture she took when she retired them; they were post toasted. She was probably a buck sixty fully loaded...


I have at least that many miles on my year old Redwing 952's. They are usually due for a re-tread every other year. Two re-treads max.
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  #422  
Old 28 October 2014, 23:55
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Fuck it, I just ordered lem's boulders. I went to run after standing for 8 hours yesterday. I run in vibrams, and my feet hurt so bad. I normally have no foot pain while running. Unacceptable, dress code be damned. I'm just gonna wear em and see if I get busted.
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  #423  
Old 29 October 2014, 00:46
gerryeric gerryeric is offline
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Just don't put skulls in the laces (like mine) and you'll probably be fine.
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  #424  
Old 9 November 2014, 02:49
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Lem's are awesome! They were a bit too small, so I'm waiting on the next size up, but hell yes, exactly what I want to wear!

Now, off to maratac to buy some skulls... :D
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  #425  
Old 8 December 2014, 22:37
johnnylaw johnnylaw is offline
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Boot recommendations for Kilimanjaro

I have tried searching and haven't found any matches.

I am entertaining the idea of climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro in June 2015.

Do any of you guys who have experience in mountaineering have any recommendations on a good boot for that specific mission?

So far I am looking at the Asolo Fugitive GTX's that the folks at REI are recommending. On a daily basis, I usually wear Merrill boots because they hold up fairly well and a so lightweight and comfortable. I just don't think they'd be up to task summit Kilimanjaro.

I am all ears, so please give me some ideas. Thanks in advance.
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  #426  
Old 8 December 2014, 22:51
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A couple of years ago, I summited Pico de Orizaba, and I just checked my boots and they were "Original SWAT" by someone -- no idea who.

Point is, I had better boots but somehow put the wrong ones in my travel bag.

They worked out perfectly, including with crampons. Not the slightest bit of wear, and that is across some stupidly rocky terrain before getting to the glacier.

Mis 02....
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  #427  
Old 8 December 2014, 23:13
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Never been to Africa, but i've been on a mountain or two, and Kilimanjaro is a long hump from bottom to top. Whatever you pick, make sure that they are as light as you can get away with while still giving the support you'll need. My understanding is that very few people make it to the top without sounding like an old-fashioned steam engine first. Lightness will be your buddy, and that'll apply across your entire packing list.
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  #428  
Old 8 December 2014, 23:17
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^^^^+1 -- light is right. The boots I listed were really light (are really light). After I made it to the glacier, I was glad I had not a single ounce extra of weight....
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  #429  
Old 8 December 2014, 23:41
34RX 34RX is offline
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Haven't climbed it but here's my .02. Do you know which route? Some routes don't require crampons and some do per certain guide services. The type of crampon system can dictate you use certain boots.

As everyone has stated, a quality light boot is the way to go. The heavy boot rage of the 90's was great marketing.

I'd also buy 1 pair asap and start wearing them on training hikes. If they work for you, buy a second pair and lightly break them in. Use the 2nd pair on the actual trip.

Unguided?
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  #430  
Old 8 December 2014, 23:51
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I have short wide feet. I have liked Scarpa leather boots. Their plastics have been tight on me. La Sportiva leathers have also been good. A more accomplished climbing friend wore women's boots as he had very narrow feet. This reduced his heel slippage and eliminated blisters.

Also, remember on a long slog downhill you can get blisters under toenails if the toe box is overly restrictive.
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  #431  
Old 9 December 2014, 01:15
Colonel Flagg Colonel Flagg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 34RX View Post
Haven't climbed it but here's my .02. Do you know which route? Some routes don't require crampons and some do per certain guide services. The type of crampon system can dictate you use certain boots.

As everyone has stated, a quality light boot is the way to go. The heavy boot rage of the 90's was great marketing.

I'd also buy 1 pair asap and start wearing them on training hikes. If they work for you, buy a second pair and lightly break them in. Use the 2nd pair on the actual trip.

Unguided?
Good advice.

I did Mt Meru across the way.

Not as high, but steeper and more scrambling.

A broken in trekking/scrambling type boot should suit well.

Something else to consider is buying/renting collapsible climbing poles.

Sounds(and might look a bit) homo, but we motored up and down Meru in the absolute minimum allowed time(around inflexible gate closure timings) with their help.

What also helped us is being awesome to our local guides and anyone/everyone in the local business we came across.

Tourist/climbers who treat local support folks heading up the hill can get discretely run into the ground by guides and helped to fail.

A couple things:

Check for immunization. It might still compel a shot(and bring shot card) for Yellow Fever.

It might be worth some specialty travel insurance to exfil home in the event of an emergency.

Which means you might want to carry some speciality Travel Insurance cover, just in case.

The security situation in Kenya is not the greatest at the moment. Best to do some homework and mitigate risk.
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  #432  
Old 9 December 2014, 01:16
johnnylaw johnnylaw is offline
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Thanks guys, I appreciate the input. From what I have been told so far by the so called "experts" at REI, is that I should choose a good stiff "more durable" (IE: HEAVY) mountaineering boot.

The route we are planning on taking is the 7 day Rongai route and it supposedly doesn't have much "technical" climbing to it. More of a steep hike from what I have been told.

Thanks for the suggestions on other thoughts Col Flagg, I need to hear all that kind of stuff too. I am just in the beginning stages to try and plan a trip, so a LOT of homework is in order. My better half is in contact with an outfit called "Team Kilimanjaro" which I believe is based out of the UK and has pretty good ratings.

Last edited by johnnylaw; 9 December 2014 at 01:22.
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  #433  
Old 9 December 2014, 01:42
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I summited Kili in Garmon T8 tactical jungle boots. My feet froze, figuratively speaking, but all was well. You just put on some boots and climb the damn rock.
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  #434  
Old 20 April 2015, 18:11
tickwomp tickwomp is offline
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I wear Salomon GTX mids. I really like the Kevlar lacing system and fit. I find that they outlast my Merrells.
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  #435  
Old 14 August 2015, 13:56
Long Walk Long Walk is offline
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My son is 15 and has grown out of his boots. He has been wearing a pair of Bates Gore-Tex lined black boots he really liked. I checked the RAT Boots at LA Police Gear, but they don't have his size (10R). He is buying these on his own and does not want to spend more than $50.
He is in the woods quite often, but these are more for being outside, summer and winter.

Other than the RAT 2nd's, is there another military quality boot that would fit his budget and be worth owning?
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  #436  
Old 17 August 2015, 15:53
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Do you guys use any kind of insole in your boot? I've got a 'vintage' pair of La Sportivas (that I love) but on a recent 7-hour 5-miler (vertical) I thought my feet would feel better if I'd cut em off and walk down on my stumps. I'm thinking about sorbothane or some-such... I originally bought these boots due to a nasty, debilitating stone-bruise on the ball of my foot after an aggressive day of chukar hunting. Like I said, I love them but they're stiff, heavy and the insoles are very hard....
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  #437  
Old 28 August 2015, 00:39
Jimmur275 Jimmur275 is offline
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Hey Murph, I recommend Super Feet and depending on how your La Sportivas fit your feet makes a difference in which color to get. I use Orange as I use high volume boots, my old Galibiers and Zamberlans. If your still in the Seattle area go to REI and they will let you put them to the test to see which one works for you and your boots.

After the fires burn out here in the John Day area I will be chasing Chukars as well.
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  #438  
Old 28 August 2015, 09:01
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IronCross IronCross is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murph View Post
Do you guys use any kind of insole in your boot? I've got a 'vintage' pair of La Sportivas (that I love) but on a recent 7-hour 5-miler (vertical) I thought my feet would feel better if I'd cut em off and walk down on my stumps. I'm thinking about sorbothane or some-such... I originally bought these boots due to a nasty, debilitating stone-bruise on the ball of my foot after an aggressive day of chukar hunting. Like I said, I love them but they're stiff, heavy and the insoles are very hard....
Murph, the Vibram insoles from Rocky S2 boots are thick, squishy and damn comfortable on a long hump. I and a few buds used to swap those into bellevilles, or whatever other boot that the insole didn't measure up.
Worth a try, but they're also pretty thick, so if you're at a premium for room in those boots this might crowd you.
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  #439  
Old 29 August 2015, 02:11
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Jim, IC: Thanks, that's exactly the kind of advice I was looking for. I'm sure part of the problem is the soles of my feet (and the rest of my legs) just aren't used to that kind of humping--but still. I think I have plenty of room in these boots for some thick-ish soles. Thanks again, guys.
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  #440  
Old 29 August 2015, 08:50
EightyDeuce EightyDeuce is offline
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I put superfeet insoles in my hockey skates and my hiking boots and noticed in both types of applications I have considerable less foot pain and fatigue.

http://www.superfeet.com/en-us/
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