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  #21  
Old 18 June 2018, 12:00
Crucible guy Crucible guy is offline
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I went through the program from Jack Welch (JWMI). I can tell you it is no slouch program. Twenty four months of papers and reading on every topic of business. The part I liked most was that they valued the input from the student up front and all the way through the courses. The classes I took were modified based on the input from previous instructors and likewise, the classes after me were changed as well. I can verify this because I took it after one friend finished and he watched me struggle through. Another friend went through after me and it had tweaked even more. If an instructor was a loser, they canned him. No room for lazy people in JWMI, instructors or students.

They also used technology better than any other college I took courses from, outstanding use of video and audio without a doubt.

They have also taken note of the value gained during an MBA from the networking opportunities. They have specifically set up networking events during and after the program for students and alumni to network. It seems to be working well from what I can see.

CG
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  #22  
Old 18 June 2018, 12:43
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Originally Posted by Hot Mess View Post
Do you have a MBA?
Noooo god no. I’m finishing up my masters in history. But I grew up around a family full of investment bankers and Wall Street types so I have a good idea of how it goes. My father was a headhunter with his own firm in NYC placing high level executives. Actually, he “retired” right after 9/11 because a lot of his client companies were based in the WTC. Part of why I deviated from the family path and went into the military instead of directly to college after high school.

That aside, when it came to marketability, he was always against an MBA unless it was from an A or B school. He said it was much easier to place guys who had graduate degrees in specific FAME subjects because they weren’t as broad as an MBA in a FAME subject. Now, with that being said this was for putting guys in positions where the entry level was six figures. With that being said, if you’re looking to enter into an entirely new field that’s business related, I’d recommend getting a graduate degree in the subject you want to enter. If you’re already working in the field you want to be in , go for the MBA. Just my .02.
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  #23  
Old 18 June 2018, 12:46
pm410 pm410 is offline
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And when I say nooo god no, it’s not a knock on an MBA degree. I’m just planning on becoming a history professor whenever I retire in 12 more years lol.
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  #24  
Old 18 June 2018, 20:34
Square Square is offline
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Originally Posted by Silverbullet View Post
If someone else is paying for it, disregard my input.

Depends what you want to do with it. Unless you're going to get into an industry that requires a Georgetown, Stanford, add whatever high priced big name school you favor, I suggest you get the least expensive AASCP rated MBA.

There's plenty of clowns walking around with high priced big name MBA's who can't do business, put deals together or grow revenue, working in every type of industry.
Totally agree--having Uncle Sam pick up the tab changes the calculus some in that the opportunity cost of going back to school is a little different.

As others have said, it all comes down to what someone wants out of the degree. Checking a box vs. learning something vs. establishing a network being the three main things to get out of a business degree.

Online obviously makes networking harder, but the type of school will largely determine the type of network someone gets wired into (or wants to be wired into). The table below is one way that I've thought about it before.

I was able to get into and went to one of the best MBA programs out there (Post 9/11 w/ yellow ribbon). When folks ask me if they should pursue something similar I always recommend getting on LinkedIn, and both searching for people who are in jobs you'd want, and see where they went to school, and then conversely search for a program and then see where the alumni end up.

[IMG]Presentation1
[/IMG]

Last edited by Square; 18 June 2018 at 20:40.
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  #25  
Old 18 June 2018, 23:55
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College was easy. My MBA kicked my ass.

Much of the work was team-based and team-related. I honestly do not know how an on-line program could replicate that.

I recall spending nine-hour binges with my team (for whatever project we were working on) on a Saturday, all day.

It was a good program. University of Detroit Mercy. Took me just shy of three years going two nights a week and about every other Saturday.

I started it before kids (95-98). There was no way I would have started after the kids came; there just aren't enough hours in the week.
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  #26  
Old 19 June 2018, 09:01
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Originally Posted by Crucible guy View Post
I went through the program from Jack Welch (JWMI). I can tell you it is no slouch program. Twenty four months of papers and reading on every topic of business. The part I liked most was that they valued the input from the student up front and all the way through the courses. The classes I took were modified based on the input from previous instructors and likewise, the classes after me were changed as well. I can verify this because I took it after one friend finished and he watched me struggle through. Another friend went through after me and it had tweaked even more. If an instructor was a loser, they canned him. No room for lazy people in JWMI, instructors or students.

They also used technology better than any other college I took courses from, outstanding use of video and audio without a doubt.

They have also taken note of the value gained during an MBA from the networking opportunities. They have specifically set up networking events during and after the program for students and alumni to network. It seems to be working well from what I can see.

CG
That's interesting about JWMI. I've looked at it a few different times as a potential pursuit. I see that their marketing is on point.

One thing I found interesting is to see that JW mentioned he would send someone in his family to HBS rather than sending them through his own course.

What was the sticker price at the end of the degree?
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  #27  
Old 19 June 2018, 09:25
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Originally Posted by MixedLoad View Post
That's interesting about JWMI. I've looked at it a few different times as a potential pursuit. I see that their marketing is on point.

One thing I found interesting is to see that JW mentioned he would send someone in his family to HBS rather than sending them through his own course.

What was the sticker price at the end of the degree?
Thank you everyone for your well thought out responses. I may be looking at a career field change, so it looks like I have research to do.
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  #28  
Old 19 June 2018, 12:15
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Originally Posted by Dark Helmet View Post
College was easy. My MBA kicked my ass.

Much of the work was team-based and team-related. I honestly do not know how an on-line program could replicate that.

I recall spending nine-hour binges with my team (for whatever project we were working on) on a Saturday, all day.

It was a good program. University of Detroit Mercy. Took me just shy of three years going two nights a week and about every other Saturday.

I started it before kids (95-98). There was no way I would have started after the kids came; there just aren't enough hours in the week.
My wife went to the Simon School at the University of Rochester for her MBA. She had the same experience. She started the year we were married, thus no kids. This meant for 2-years I golfed every weekend while she worked with her team. My golf game got very good...

My take way from her experience was to pick your teammates, if you have a choice, very carefully. My wife is a Type AAA personality who refuses to cater to slackers. Thus, she let those teammates know if they didn't carry their weight, which led to some interesting situations.
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  #29  
Old 19 June 2018, 13:41
Square Square is offline
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Originally Posted by Hot Mess View Post
Thank you everyone for your well thought out responses. I may be looking at a career field change, so it looks like I have research to do.
LinkedIn is definitely your friend. Find some people who are doing what you want to do and check out their background, to include education. Next step is to reach out to them to talk about how to get to where you want to go.

Other thing I forgot to mention above... make sure you check into differences in benefits if you're going to use Post-9/11 online vs. in residence. The BAH entitlement is (if I remember correctly) much less for online degrees.
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  #30  
Old 19 June 2018, 14:31
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My take way from her experience was to pick your teammates, if you have a choice, very carefully. My wife is a Type AAA personality who refuses to cater to slackers. Thus, she let those teammates know if they didn't carry their weight, which led to some interesting situations.
Spot the fuck on.

I had several situations where a team of five (where four did all the work) would approach a prof and dime out a slacker. To their credit, these asshat lazy fucks usually got either failed or dropped. It was actually pretty impressive how the system took care of that, looking back.

Not sure of this matters, and I do not want to sound like a back-woods country-fuck, but every one of these slackers, with only one exception, was foreign-born and studying abroad in the US.
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  #31  
Old 19 June 2018, 14:53
Crucible guy Crucible guy is offline
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Originally Posted by MixedLoad View Post
That's interesting about JWMI. I've looked at it a few different times as a potential pursuit. I see that their marketing is on point.

One thing I found interesting is to see that JW mentioned he would send someone in his family to HBS rather than sending them through his own course.

What was the sticker price at the end of the degree?
It was around $30k - I had employer support so I was less fanatical about it.

They do not skimp on the group projects and interaction with other students. Of course, I reaffirmed the old group project maxim, group projects suck! The exact same dynamics happen in online group projects as in-person projects. One does the work (me) two or three contribute but not substantially, and one or two are wallflowers or they are running their own game plan. Their own game plan will earn them a giant F, but they must speak their mind.

It teaches you the same information and the video portions were better than anywhere else I see. I am now a professor at two other colleges and neither are the caliber of the program I went through at JWMI.

CG
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  #32  
Old 20 June 2018, 17:24
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Having attended two MBA programs (started at Emory and finished at UGA), I can say this for a fact...the current MBA programs out there are money makers for the schools and nothing more. Most of my classmates will state that they use less than 20% of the information gained....if at all. This is especially true of the “Executive MBA” programs. It is essentially a very expensive check in the block in order to move up in the org chart.

If you’re looking to move up within your job function or career, I would suggest going into a masters pick of ram that is associated with your bachelors degree.
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  #33  
Old 21 June 2018, 21:26
PocketKings PocketKings is offline
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My MBA was an executive program. It wasn’t about moving up an org chart, it was solely to prepare myself for business ownership, which I achieved 8 years ago. Granted, my focus was Entrepreneurship, so it was less theoretical and more practical.

For a ‘check the box’ I don’t recommend spending the time and money. If you have a business or an end goal, it can be invaluable if you don’t have a business undergrad.
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  #34  
Old 22 June 2018, 13:13
sar_one sar_one is offline
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... I can say this for a fact...the current MBA programs out there are money makers for the schools and nothing more...
So true. I just completed the online MBA with Temple University because it was ranked #1 the past 4 years. $60'ish K for the program (thank you GI Bill) and I will say it was challenging. All well and dandy until 2018 US News rankings came out and the school announced an error in their statistics reporting, removing the school from the rankings for this year. Further investigation is showing misreporting since day 1. 300 students signed up after the #1 was announced (300x60k= $18 million in revenue for an online program). Not sure where the rankings will shake out when all said and done, but currently a class action against the school. Thought I was safe with a well established B&M school, but as JAFO said, its all about the $$.
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  #35  
Old 2 July 2018, 14:46
peter28 peter28 is offline
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Just do the Georgetown Global Executive MBA. It will work with your schedule and is a more interesting program than a straight MBA.
If you're going right back into the same industry that's a great program (or any executive MBA program for that matter). It's probably good for networking too, since you'll be classed with peers who are in similar roles/positions in their careers. They're really expensive, as I think there's an international component to it too.

I think the straight two-year MBA is probably better suited to meet your 50% education/50% networking goal. The education in those executive programs is very high-level (from what I've seen - I sat in a couple of those classes). If you're in DC, then Georgetown has evening/part-time program that has the exact same curriculum as the full-time program.
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  #36  
Old 2 July 2018, 17:58
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If you're going right back into the same industry that's a great program (or any executive MBA program for that matter). It's probably good for networking too, since you'll be classed with peers who are in similar roles/positions in their careers. They're really expensive, as I think there's an international component to it too.

I think the straight two-year MBA is probably better suited to meet your 50% education/50% networking goal. The education in those executive programs is very high-level (from what I've seen - I sat in a couple of those classes). If you're in DC, then Georgetown has evening/part-time program that has the exact same curriculum as the full-time program.
The Sumerian raises a good point. Assuming you would get the job anyway based on your networking and ability to translate your past experience to whatever you are doing next, the GEMBA will provide a transitional credential with a short time commitment (72 days, I think, over the course of a year). But the cost of doing your group work in 5 different countries is steep. This is offset a little by the degree you get from the school in Spain, which can help a little if you intend to land in the EU.

What that program does NOT offer, is job placement/career services. The GEMBA also only offers 20k tuition assistance for a 160k program. Those issues could be critical depending on your circumstances, in which case I regretfully agree with the thermiter of hiluxes.

They run info sessions regularly and are a good opportunity to get a free lunch and figure out if it will work. I ranted at the dean about the lack of an Africa component and an overreliance on the outdated BRICs orientationof their emerging market courses.
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  #37  
Old 3 July 2018, 11:30
peter28 peter28 is offline
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the thermiter of hiluxes.

I ranted at the dean about the lack of an Africa component and an overreliance on the outdated BRICs orientationof their emerging market courses.
That's hilarious...I haven't thought about that in a long time. It was one Hilux btw, not like I made a hobby of it. Thanks for reminding me, I have to go back and look at the picture of the poor ol' car.

Btw, for anyone reading that's interested - good emerging market courses are the domain of the MSFS at Georgetown not the business school. MSFS has a solid professor there who was the equity portfolio manager at Ashmore EM fund. He has a great grasp of EM political and economic systems and how they can foster investment opportunities within those states. As much as I praise his skills, he doesn't like me too much...imagine that.

As far as the country of Africa (excl. Arab states) goes, I think it's referred to as a Frontier Market (now). Some investor at Goldman Sachs probably got a promotion over that one.
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  #38  
Old 5 July 2018, 01:06
dagger0824 dagger0824 is offline
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Johns Hopkins and Columbia U have online MBA programs. I think both would suit your needs. JHU's MBA is newer, so it may not have all the kinks worked out yet.
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  #39  
Old 5 July 2018, 02:29
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I am coming up on my last two semesters for my MBA at Ashland University in Ohio with a concentration in finance. I have my undergrad in CJ and wanted to become more familiar with the business aspect of the corporation I work for. I also look at it as a "Plan B" in case I should ever get hurt in the LOD at the police department or if my EP gig goes south.
I looked at a variety of schools and chose the same one where I obtained my undergrad, all of it online because I am very familiar with the online education system they use. I travel a lot and it fits my needs. Some of the course are pretty easy and some are more complex and complicated, depending on your breadth of knowledge and experience.

As for the cost, I am roughly around $22K for the program compared to $40K at another school I looked into. I also chose online since I have the ability to network extensively with other public and private sector entities through my work.
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  #40  
Old 9 July 2018, 22:22
Chemical Cookie Chemical Cookie is offline
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Originally Posted by Hot Mess View Post
I searched and didn’t find anything. Has anyone here completed an online MBA from a REPUTABLE school, not Devry or Phoenix...
What's happening gents! Long time - I've been away.

HM, have you considered UNC Chapel Hill's Kenan Flagler MBA@UNC? It's a top 20 program and is all online.

I'm not a fan of their program (because they dinged me ) but there is no denying the strong brand they've been able to establish.

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Originally Posted by HighDragLowSpeed View Post
Almost all of the big Ivy League schools and others like Stanford have online graduate programs now. Not cheap but would you expect an Ivy League school to be?
HDLS, did you know Yale has a PA program that is mostly online? Crazy stuff!

For MBAs, I can't think of any Ivy that is online. Cornell has a boardroom type Executive MBA (EMBA Americas) that is pretty solid. We had a Navy SMU senior enlisted, a reserve JSOC O, OGA, and several other mil guys and gals in my program year. Cornell LOVES mil folks and goes out of their way to seek us out. In fact, they valued the mil perspective so much that when a small group of us (three total) approached the Dean to have Gen (R) Casey speak; schedules aligned and he spoke at our third and final residency. He spoke to cohort after session one evening about his time making decisions in a VUCA environment. Afterwards, was great to speak with Gen (R) Casey in a private setting. The program set up dinner, beers, and a veteran only closed door event where we were able to speak with Casey. Pretty interesting guy.

The program will keep you on your toes, but it isn't impossible.

If you want more info, reach out to me via FB/IG. As you can see, I rarely check in these days. I need to change that pronto!

ETA: I used the VA/VOCREHAB to pay for my EMBA. In fact, I used the VA to pay for all of my schooling. Before the VOCREHAB picked up the tab, I think I came out of pocket $20k (or so) for my EMBA.

Last edited by Chemical Cookie; 9 July 2018 at 22:32. Reason: Added the bottom piece
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