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  #21  
Old 8 May 2013, 06:35
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I'm moving into a house tomorrow, and will be putting together a good sized raised bed...no clue how well anything is going to grow here..but I guess I'll figure it out. I don't eat much that comes out of the ground (really nothing but peas, greens, and carrots most of the time, with the occasional tomato thrown in) so my plant selection will be pretty limited...I'll just have to see how it goes...
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  #22  
Old 8 May 2013, 06:48
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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Our garden took some time.

Our soil is mostly nutrient poor dirt and sand.

We're on our 3rd year.

Chicken, rabbit, and horse turd really expanded our garden growth rates.

We don't spray.

The usual veggies. Garlic did really well last year.

It has become a full time job for my wife, but she loves it.

I'm thinking of an indoor starter w/ lights and all for next spring.
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  #23  
Old 8 May 2013, 06:58
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How do you grow garlic?
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  #24  
Old 8 May 2013, 07:49
Gsniper Gsniper is online now
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Garlic comes in bulbs just like onions. I've got a fair amount in the ground with my onions.
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  #25  
Old 8 May 2013, 09:10
Azatty Azatty is offline
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Originally Posted by Stopp700 View Post
How do you grow garlic?
Leave a clove alone long enough and it starts sprouting all by itself. Every couple months I find an old clove or two in the fridge (wife keeps putting them there) that has a sprout growing out of it.
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  #26  
Old 8 May 2013, 09:18
Azatty Azatty is offline
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Originally Posted by BOFH View Post
I'm moving into a house tomorrow, and will be putting together a good sized raised bed...no clue how well anything is going to grow here..but I guess I'll figure it out. I don't eat much that comes out of the ground (really nothing but peas, greens, and carrots most of the time, with the occasional tomato thrown in) so my plant selection will be pretty limited...I'll just have to see how it goes...
Unless I'm misinformed, you're in the desert now. There are quite a few gardening resources here, and lots of stuff grows well, including tropical fruits. The natives planted the "three sisters" (squash, corn, beans) and lived quite well.
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  #27  
Old 8 May 2013, 09:23
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Originally Posted by Longrifle View Post
Google "3 sisters gardening" if you're not familiar with it.
Thanks for the three sisters tip.

Carrots also go well with tomatoes, I put some in last weekend.

I have a 40x25' spot for my vegi's.

Half of it is for tomatoes, twenty plants, but I do a lot of canning for sauces, and salsa.

I've tried a lot over the years, but this year I'm down to: tomato, eggplant, jalapeno, habanero, cucumber (that I'm growing upright this year instead of having them crawl on the ground) squash (butternut, acorn and straightneck) and zucchini.

My gardens been tiled, soaker hoses buried, and black carpet down to limit/control weeds. My back and knees are getting too old to be doing much weed pulling. One of the best investments I've made over the years.

I put most of what I am growing in around the first week of June.

Tick, tock, tick, tock.....
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  #28  
Old 8 May 2013, 09:56
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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Originally Posted by Stopp700 View Post
How do you grow garlic?

Go to a farmer's union/market in the fall. Buy bulbs. Plant in Fall. Watch 'em grow in Spring. Snip the flowery tops (scapes) to keep bulb growing.

No fuss. No muss. It should grow easily where you are, Stopp.

We've had enough each year for consumption and to re-plant (unless my old-country mother shows up).

I have not used regular store brought brands for planting. Heard it doesn't work.

Last edited by 8654maine; 8 May 2013 at 10:03. Reason: spelling
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  #29  
Old 8 May 2013, 10:15
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Originally Posted by Azatty View Post
Unless I'm misinformed, you're in the desert now. There are quite a few gardening resources here, and lots of stuff grows well, including tropical fruits. The natives planted the "three sisters" (squash, corn, beans) and lived quite well.

Thanks for the heads up! You are not misinformed...I don't eat corn, but could deal with squash and beans...and some tropical fruit could be interesting...
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  #30  
Old 8 May 2013, 11:16
AKAPete AKAPete is offline
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But your neighbors do

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Thanks for the heads up! You are not misinformed...I don't eat corn, but could deal with squash and beans...and some tropical fruit could be interesting...
But your neighbors do. Mine posted dibs on all the sweet corn we can't eat.

Right now it's a race between the baby corn stalks and the bushytailed rats. Will the stalks get big enough to defend themselves or will the rats nib them off in their youth.

Down to 27 corn plants from the first planting.

Going to plant the second batch in a bout a week.

Tomato plants are showing their first fruits. Bushytailed rats like those also - but only just after they turn pink.
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  #31  
Old 8 May 2013, 11:42
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When I grew corn, it was the stinkin' raccoons!
Every moring, I'd go out and find the the raccoons had pulled the corn stalks down to examine the corn developement. Not yet being ripe, they move on.... leaving my corn stalks lying on the ground.
I hated those fat barstards.
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  #32  
Old 8 May 2013, 11:50
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Ground hogs are bad about pulling down young cornstalks also. I have an agreement with the local wildlife. They stay out of my garden, they don't end up in my stew pot.
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  #33  
Old 8 May 2013, 12:34
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Originally Posted by krustykrab View Post
I rent so I am pretty limited to what I can do. I wish I could have some land of my own. I have a 2x4 raised bed, a 4x4 raised bed with about another 5x5 of tilled earth. All my tomatoes and strawberries are in big pots in the driveway. I make do with the space I have, but the watermelons and cucumbers might get interesting. Gsniper, I think when I retire I would like to start my own farm, organic veggies "farm to table" is on the rise down here in Socal so who knows what will happen in the next decade.
Cattle panels or chicken wire makes great trellis' for cucumbers and peas; I use bamboo pole 'teepees' to grow pole beans.

You can use the '5 gallon bucket pyramid' to grow tomatoes, cucumbers, or any thing else; stack the buckets so that the rims of the second and third levels are resting securely on the buckets below; drill holes in the SIDES of the buckets about 1/2 inch above the bottom so that excess water drains into lower buckets, then out the bottom at the side instead being trapped under the lowest buckets.

see attachment
Attachment 23806

you can stabilize them by sinking a 2 x 4 into the ground behind each end, create 'cross bars' then putting a screw from inside the bucket into the cross bars to hold it all together.
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Last edited by RGR.Montcalm; 13 March 2014 at 09:00.
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  #34  
Old 8 May 2013, 12:45
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Originally Posted by tooslow View Post
When I grew corn, it was the stinkin' raccoons!
Every moring, I'd go out and find the the raccoons had pulled the corn stalks down to examine the corn developement. Not yet being ripe, they move on.... leaving my corn stalks lying on the ground.
I hated those fat barstards.
My grandfather's fix for raccoons was to drive several 2 x 2 stakes into the ground close to the garden.


Then he would get a can of sardines for each pole, empty the can into a bowl and nail the can on top of the post. then he would chop up the sardines and add rat poison.

The 'coons would climb the pole (the pole kept dogs out of the sardines) get a sardine and take it to the creek near his garden- I will use a #2 washtub.

They 'wash' their food before earting but he would find them dead either at the creek or at the base of the pole. m

Then he would skin them out and sell the fur to fly fishing mfr's
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  #35  
Old 8 May 2013, 12:50
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My gardens been tiled, soaker hoses buried, and black carpet down to limit/control weeds.
I elevate my soaker hoses so they spray down onto the plants; I elevate them on 1" PVC pipe 7' long driven into the ground, drill a hole in the top about 1/2" from the top, then zip tie the hose so that it sprays down.

Less erosion from 'melting' the rows
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  #36  
Old 8 May 2013, 13:00
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Originally Posted by BOFH View Post
I'm moving into a house tomorrow, and will be putting together a good sized raised bed...no clue how well anything is going to grow here..but I guess I'll figure it out. I don't eat much that comes out of the ground (really nothing but peas, greens, and carrots most of the time, with the occasional tomato thrown in) so my plant selection will be pretty limited...I'll just have to see how it goes...
Concrete blocks work well and are cheap and don't rot. Dry lay 2 runs then find a local horse barn and get some composted horse manure. Fill the raised bed with a combo of composted horse manure, sand, and topsoil.

2 runs of concrete block is higher than the rabiits can climb...
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  #37  
Old 8 May 2013, 13:09
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Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
composted horse manure.
I was always told you want cow manure over horse, reason being that cows have a 4 stage stomach so what they eat is thoroughly digested/destroyed. Whereas with horse, everything they eat comes right back out and will grow. If they eat oats they shit oats and they will grow in your garden?

Any truth to that?

Also, I like the idea you mentioned about hanging the soaker hoses, sounds interesting, but I worry about leaf mold (especially on my tomatoes) and things of that sort. I have not experienced any erosion (or I'm to green to recognize it) burying them. But it is somewhat of a PITA to do it each year. I think your method is easier, and might be more effective.

Thanks for the tips.
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  #38  
Old 8 May 2013, 13:17
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I hated those fat barstards.
Me, too

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  #39  
Old 8 May 2013, 13:36
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Originally Posted by theWookie View Post
I was always told you want cow manure over horse, reason being that cows have a 4 stage stomach so what they eat is thoroughly digested/destroyed. Whereas with horse, everything they eat comes right back out and will grow. If they eat oats they shit oats and they will grow in your garden?

Any truth to that?

Also, I like the idea you mentioned about hanging the soaker hoses, sounds interesting, but I worry about leaf mold (especially on my tomatoes) and things of that sort. I have not experienced any erosion (or I'm to green to recognize it) burying them. But it is somewhat of a PITA to do it each year. I think your method is easier, and might be more effective.

Thanks for the tips.
The guy I get the horse manure from composts it for quite a while- nothing was growing on the pile he loaded me from.

To prevent leaf mold, water once or twice a week, in the morning ONLY, before the sun comes up (around 0430) then the water has a chance to soak in then evaporate before the evening. If it rains during the week, don't water for a couple of days afterward, unless it is really just a sprinkle.

Mold usually occurs from overwatering and watering in the late afternoon and evening when the water has less chance to evaporate.
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  #40  
Old 8 May 2013, 13:51
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composts it
I thought that might be the case and noticed that was included in your OP.

I think I over water, actually I know I do - I need to work on that - thanks!
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