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Old 7 January 2020, 12:21
chokeu2's Avatar
chokeu2 chokeu2 is offline
Involuntary Yoga Guy
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Atlanta
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Most fun I've had in training in a long time!

So last night at BJJ we did something that sounds terribly boring, but ended up being extremely fun, and very enlightening.

I've always taken pride in being a really technical BJJ guy, and this simple type of drill really gave a way of putting that notion in perspective.

We started doing what my coach, who happens to be one of my best friend's, calls Brain Jiu-jitsu. He's actually thought it through well enough that BJJ Fanatics had him do a DVD. It is something he arranged because he knows quite a few guys, yours truly included, that have had some head injury issues, PTSD, physical limitations, etc.

It is literally rolling, one step at a time.
Pick a start position, say closed guard, decide who moves first. And then that person can only do ONE move. If that move is grabbing a collar, wrist, foot on hip, whatever, that's it. Then the next guy gets his one move.

Quite specifically the game of chess set to Jiu-jitsu. It will absolutely test what you think you know, your ability to defend, and not one chain of moves ahead, but two or three. And it has to be that way because you only get one move, and your opponent can see your moves coming a mile away.

Surprisingly, you can lead someone down a rabbit hole full of traps, they can do the same, and eventually, you have your opponent knowing that they have to make a choice that could get them subbed, passed, or swept.

I enjoyed it because I have gone from being extraordinarily aggressive to a very heavy pressure kind of player. The professor I spent 12 years with was an attack, attack, attack kind of guy. Overwhelmingly so, with the mindset being so many attacks that defense is secondary. Which I loved back then, but not at 49 years of age. This method of training makes you really think, and it lets you know what works for you and does not. I got to emphasize pure technique and pressure.

Each roll with some of the advanced guys lasted for about 15 or 20 minutes, and while very slow, it was very challenging mentally and physically. The lower belts usually lasted only about 4 or 5 moves, but it did sharpen what they do know.

On top of everything else, it really did help "keep it playful" to use a cheesy Gracie phrase. One of my buddies, who's a good 265 easily, found himself in my open guard, my legs in position to sweep him, but he was also stuck because I had a cross collar choke sunk deep. So he had to choose between stopping the sweep, or choking himself when I allowed the simple turn in my wrists to complete the choke.

Coach kept saying, "your move Mike", "your move Mike", and he was part laughing, part frustrated, because if he didn't get choked, he'd get swept; and he was aware of all the moves that got us there, and what was coming next.

Now, my brain in racing about figuring out new way to game plan training, rolling, continued learning.

And applying pressure from the side.... Sooooo satisfying... I'm 217 pounds, and got taught by Murilo Bustamante and Rafael Lovato themselves on how to apply pressure. All that weight, focused just below the sternum, feeling like it's 400 pounds... And the opponent has to think clearly of what comes next.

Brutal in a whole new, slow, grinding, enlightening way.

If you're a grappler, try it.
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  #2  
Old 7 January 2020, 14:25
BadKarma BadKarma is offline
Grinder Monkey
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 528
Super drill. We do the same thing, sometimes from standing sometimes from the floor. Up to 5 moves at a time so you definitely get to work from a disadvantage. You can blend strikes, throws and locks into a flow. We often call it killing me softly since it's "soft work". It's also THE most fun I've ever had training.
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Old 7 January 2020, 15:07
chokeu2's Avatar
chokeu2 chokeu2 is offline
Involuntary Yoga Guy
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadKarma View Post
. It's also THE most fun I've ever had training.
Really? That's cool to hear because my head is still spinning from it. And the notion of allowing up to five moves at once... hell yes...

It's cool how it makes you assess the dynamic you smash with.
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  #4  
Old 7 January 2020, 16:14
BadKarma BadKarma is offline
Grinder Monkey
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Colorado
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It is an amazing tool, we sometimes add in a training knife or a second opponent who is also move !imited. The second guy arriving standing when you're midway through your roll usually makes it really interesting.
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  #5  
Old 7 January 2020, 18:09
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leopardprey leopardprey is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Indiana
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Thumbs up

Nice! BJJ Chi Sau.
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  #6  
Old 8 January 2020, 13:15
BadKarma BadKarma is offline
Grinder Monkey
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leopardprey View Post
Nice! BJJ Chi Sau.
Sort of for sure, it's definitely a skin listening tool. We picked it up from Systema training and quickly incorporated it into the rest of our training.
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