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  #21  
Old 21 January 2013, 13:36
TunnelRat TunnelRat is offline
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If you use once fired military brass, the primers are crimped into the pocket, requiring the pocket to be swedged or reamed out before you can reprime it. I have used both the RCBS and Dillon swedgers, and think the Dillon is much faster and sturdier (I bent the rod on the RCBS one.) I use a hand primer as well even with a progressive as sometimes the swedger doesn't remove the entire crimp, and then you get squashed primers if they even go in at all.

Has anybody ever ordered from www(dot)patsreloading(dot)com? He seems to be the only one who has much of anything, but I can't really discern the ordering process from his website.
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  #22  
Old 21 January 2013, 13:50
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flhshvlhed flhshvlhed is offline
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As stated - get a manual. Generally they are bullet specific. I would get a general reloading book, and read up on it. Or you could just get the one for the bullets that you'll be using. Once you get a warm and fuzzy for it, if you're not going to be reloading for very many calibers, there are exert pamphlets that are caliber specific IOT save money.

Unlike a cookbook w/ a "recipe", reloading books are to be followed pretty much to the n'th degree. There are those that say "The manufacturers are low on their charges - I can load them hotter than that" True - but for how long? The manufacturers have all of the equipment to test that stuff - let them do it. I've been reloading on my own for about 25yrs and have been around it about 40yrs - if it says 7.5gr is max charge - that's it, for me. The only wpn that I've had that had a catastrophic failure, was w/ factory ammo.

My 1st press was a Lee Progressive. There are those that say that Lee is junk. I've loaded thousands of rounds w/ this press, and the only thing that I replaced was a $1 nylon cog - still have it/use it. I was willed a Dillon 550, but haven't had a chance to get it up and running yet. I plan on sending it back to Dillon (unequivocably the best warranty in the industry) and have them get it up and running for me, when I get a chance. They are a little more expensive than Lee and some of the others, but their CS is unreal.

As stated - for pistol cartridges, spend the few extra $'s and get carbide. Also - Lee dies come w/ a case holder as opposed to the others. Generally, they are about $10 cheaper AND they save you $6 or so.

Best of luck - remember - follow the directions.
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  #23  
Old 21 January 2013, 14:16
diverescue diverescue is offline
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I started with the RCBS Rock Chucker kit. After adding a powder measure and a Redding powder trickler, I was good to go for a while. Then I added a case trimmer and neck prep tools.

You will quickly find out what you like and don't. I still like the single stage for rifle loads, because I'm very picky about how my rifles perform.

I would read a good reloading manual from front to back, and then get some caliber specific books like these that consolidate most of that info, but span various brands of bullets. http://www.brownells.com/books-video...000826_d_20569

I'm currently debating between the Dillon 550 and 650. I want the ability to shoot even when everyone is going crazy on their ammo hoarding. Our local WalMart is restricting people to 2 boxes of ammo per day, and the shelves are still empty of almost everything but 12ga birdshot and .32 spl.
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  #24  
Old 21 January 2013, 19:07
AustinPT AustinPT is offline
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It depends on how you learn. I purchased a RCBS Rockchucker kit about 5 years ago, read "ABC's" and Speer's manuals, but was still terrified to start, cause I'm not too mechanically inclined. I googled "reloading" and "Austin", found some guy's myspace page that said he was into shooting and reloading, and took a chance and emailed him out of the blue asking for help. He was happy to walk me through the steps, and he's now one of my best friends. So if you're like me and learn by doing vs reading, find some body to walk you through it. The NRA offers a reloading course as well.

Any time I'm working up a new load (esp new load, new caliber), I pull out several manuals (ideally that specific bullet manufacturer's data), and then google it as well (ie "best load for Hornady 168 gr BTHP) - that will get you plenty of forum threads, and you can read up on that specific load. I've caught on to a lot of little nuances that way.Then I start with a mild load and work up. Having a chrony (or a friend w/ one) is extremely helpful, as is knowing how to read pressure signs.

I've since graduated to a Hornady Lock n Load, and can crank out ~200 rounds of .45 an hour. Thing's built like a tank.
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  #25  
Old 21 January 2013, 19:38
diverescue diverescue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinPT View Post
Having a chrony (or a friend w/ one) is extremely helpful, as is knowing how to read pressure signs.
A friend to double check your Chronograph alignment prior to your shot is worth his weight in chronograph. I've seen them shot into a million pieces by an idiot that didn't understand the location of his bore in relation to the elevation of his scope.

+1 on the friend who reloads. Chances are, you probably already know someone who does it. If not, nothing wrong with a class.

Just remember that your gun/face/life aren't worth a few extra fps when pushing the limits of your reloading manuals.
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  #26  
Old 21 January 2013, 20:22
RGRJN RGRJN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAFO View Post
You may want to rethink your offer to chokeu2 though...he likes to roll around on the floor with other men.
Was thinking that offer to pay me for my time was kinda Gay in a 3rd Bat kinda way.

Choke your paid up in full, anytime you wanna come up(you too JAFO). Mine and wifes schedule is screwy but we'll make it work. May not be able to shoot though(She works nights, i work 1700-0100). I need to load some .45 anyway. Heard there were Zombies coming.
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  #27  
Old 21 January 2013, 20:40
RGRJN RGRJN is offline
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Needed to correct or explain a little. Case Lube, I stated I only use lube on belted magnums(for rifles). It's because I am only neck sizing, not full length resizing.I am new to the 300WM so all my new/used brass is getting full length resized.My other calibers were new brass, once fired from my guns. There are a few reasons to do it this way, that the book can explain better than I can here. When full length resizing RIFLE cartridges I use Lube. I am also getting a little ahead of the basics. You can full length resize all your brass.
Carbide dies are the way to go for pistol. I also hear tell they have some for rifles too. I'm to cheap to even explore it. Case Lube is cheap.

Last edited by RGRJN; 21 January 2013 at 20:54.
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  #28  
Old 22 January 2013, 01:38
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EchoFiveMike EchoFiveMike is offline
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They have carbide dies for rifles, but you still need to use lube. The carbide extends die life, which matters when you're loading 10k/yr.

Case trimming is a PITA, I can recommend Gracey trimmers for mass production of rifle ammo. S/F....Ken M
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  #29  
Old 24 January 2013, 14:20
Dozer Dozer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fat Guy View Post
choke, there are good youtubes on your press.

I have used Lee Pro 1000's decades ago. I dug them out, sent them to Lee for repair and ended up getting 2 new presses for 1/2 the price.

The thing about books I have noticed from 20 years ago is that the loads are much milder. The low end loads may not even cycle your gun while the highend seem much milder than factory ammo.

I use the Lyman 49th Edition
I've been reloading since the 70s and have all my manuals from back then.., there is a stark difference between then and now. I suspect it is because of liability issues.
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  #30  
Old 24 January 2013, 14:27
Dozer Dozer is offline
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This guy does a good job of comparing differences in Dillon presses.

http://www.brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html

I've used my 550 for hunting rounds, with never a problem, same with the square deal for handgun rounds.

Back to the Rock Chucker if I am working up a special load. It's easier to watch the individual kernels of powder fall from the trickler onto the pan on the balance beam.
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  #31  
Old 24 January 2013, 15:53
tooslow tooslow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dozer View Post
I've been reloading since the 70s and have all my manuals from back then.., there is a stark difference between then and now. I suspect it is because of liability issues.
And that is why my Chrony Alpha chronograph is one of my very best friends. Start conservatively and work your way up to your velocity. You shouldn't have to go above the maximum recommended load.
In my IPSC .45s, .357s and PPC .38s I use only IMR 700X powder.
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  #32  
Old 24 January 2013, 19:16
glockcqc glockcqc is offline
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Reloading

Recommend:

- Dillon. The best & only progresive reloading press you will ever buy. No bull-shit guarantee, is no bull-shit. Also recommend Dillon carbide dies for pistola & rifle.

- Need something to measure powder..Dillon scale.

- Need calipers to measure cartridge/brass length.

- Internet. Unless your loading something like a Barnes bullet, you don't need a manual anymore.

Reloading is..or was (HA) about 1/3 the cost of buying retail cartridges. Now..it's getting "weird" again. Hard to say what the cost savings is.

Good shooting
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  #33  
Old 24 January 2013, 20:32
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Primers

OK, so riddle me this..

How in the Blue Fuck can you be out of stock of everything you sell, yet your order time is in excess of 6 weeks? How does that happen?

How does it happen that NO ONE has one fucking primer? < not one pack of 100?

For Fuck's Sake
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  #34  
Old 8 February 2013, 18:23
wirsdorfer_warrior wirsdorfer_warrior is offline
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I know a reloading shop in Mesquite tx that has been keeping primers in stock, I will check this weekend and see what they got. Shoot me a PM of what you are looking for and I will scout it out.
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  #35  
Old 12 February 2013, 16:32
timmah5 timmah5 is offline
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Getting started today, given the state of things, is definitely more costly than it should be and components are hard to come by but I think it's a good investment.

Things will turn around, the gear and components will come back into stock eventually. I say get what you can now and stay on it. When things become available, make it a regular purchase and put some extras away for a rainy day.

Read and trust your manuals. Don't get wrapped around getting the highest velocity possible. Everything has limits and trying to get a few extra feet per second at the potential cost of damaging yourself and your guns isn't worth it. Play it safe and learn the ballistics of your loads. I like the idea someone had earlier about getting a mentor if possible. Even after loading for close to ten years, I still bounce things off of a couple of other guys.

I don't think any shooter will ever regret getting started loading their own ammo.
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  #36  
Old 22 February 2013, 19:34
diverescue diverescue is offline
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Just got this from Midway. I don't mind sending them my money.



Dear Valued Customer,
In the spring of ‘77, I left the Air Force and moved to Columbia, MO to pursue my dream of running a gun shop. You see, I’d always loved the outdoors; especially shooting and hunting. Some of my fondest childhood memories involve shooting and hunting with my dad and brothers. Then, as an adult, some of my greatest joys have come while shooting and hunting with my wife, my kids, my friends and now my grandkids. I love this industry, I love our way of life and I love serving Customers.
Now, our way of life is being challenged like never before and our Customers are responding with a flood of orders. In the 35 years I’ve been in business, I’ve never seen anything like this.
We’re monitoring the political environment, our industry’s capabilities and our business on a daily basis and making policy and process changes to better serve Customers. But please understand, while we’re still able to get most orders out the same day they’re placed, you may experience longer than normal wait times on the phone or when you chat with us on the web. Also, it’s taking us a few extra days to respond to emails. Finally, we’re out of a bunch of products I know you want which breaks my heart. And when we do get them in, they rarely spend the night in the building because they’re ordered almost immediately. We’re tirelessly working to get products in the door and out to Customers as fast as we can. But, until supply catches up with demand, we’re having to limit quantities and backorders on certain products.
One thing we haven’t done is change our prices because of this surge in demand. Prices do change from time to time as they always have, but we’d never change prices because of something like this. Our pricing strategy is one of the reasons we’ve put quantity limits on certain products. We’ve all seen certain products selling two or three times higher than normal, and MidwayUSA doesn’t want to enable that type of activity. Also, we want to serve as many Customers as possible when we receive high-demand products. If it’s any consolation, none of our Employees can order products with quantity limits (myself included). We’ve all agreed to put Customers first. And that’s the way it’ll always be at MidwayUSA.
As always, everything we do is intended to be in the best interest of our Customers and we’re eternally grateful for your patience and loyalty.
Thanks for Your Business!

Larry Potterfield,
Founder and CEO of MidwayUSA

5875 West Van Horn Tavern Rd.
Columbia, MO 65203 ©2013 MidwayUSA, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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  #37  
Old 3 March 2013, 16:02
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BomberJosh BomberJosh is offline
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Man I am hoping to get through to patsreloading. The website says sales everyday but no answers or email replies, hmmm. They have some stuff listed as in supply at good prices.

has anyone ever used personalchoiceoutfitters(dot)com? they have insanely good prices like pre-election prices. you can layaway for 90 days to lock in prices now and if it isn't filled you get refund, but you also get in line privileges still if you layaway and just get a notice when its ready to be completed.

anyways i just bought 16 pound h335, 12 pound w231, 10k cci 41, 10k large pistol primers for about 1200 with free shipping. i havent seen anything for less that 2-3x that price not including shipping or hazmat.

i just hope i didn't get robbed haha.

ps. i dont care if it takes 90 days to get to me, i am in Afghan and wont be reloading until sometime next year haha. the good thing is they source the materials and get them to you eventually at nice prices. who knows what the price will be in 3 months
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  #38  
Old 3 March 2013, 20:20
Attila175 Attila175 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fat Guy View Post
OK, so riddle me this..

How in the Blue Fuck can you be out of stock of everything you sell, yet your order time is in excess of 6 weeks? How does that happen?

How does it happen that NO ONE has one fucking primer? < not one pack of 100?

For Fuck's Sake
How far are you from St Louis? I know of someone that has several thousand Winchester primers for sale. Several types. I am not sure what he has left. He will not ship.

I just ordered a Dillon 650 with a casefeeder and also ordered a Mr Bullet Feeder for it. It will be my first press. Dillon is backed up 4-8 weeks on presses and it has been two weeks since I ordered.
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  #39  
Old 3 March 2013, 21:03
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Thanks Brother, I have been finding them, here and there. My LGS just started carrying primers and I bought 5k SPP and 5k SRP. Now I just need to bend that elbow and make some ammo.
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  #40  
Old 5 March 2013, 17:19
Akheloce Akheloce is offline
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A habit I started since the 08-09 mess is to pick up a box of 1000 primers whenever I went to the shop... Whether I needed it or not (same with 22lr). This tactic has tided me over during times like this.

I feel sorry for those getting started in reloading now, since it can be so frustrating to find components. Especially when you're just getting started and have to make compromises on components you want versus components you can get your hands on at the moment. (for example, you WANT H4895, but have to settle for AA2495) Years later, you have a bunch of components that dont fit your preferences.

While it may be the new reloaders' only option now (for perceived reasons of haste) spending a few bucks a month over the years is better than spending a couple grand all at once during a time like this.
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