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  #41  
Old 12 June 2018, 21:30
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gavin gavin is offline
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I worked with Schott after his Golden Knights stint, always liked that guy. I know he went on to be a 1SG in HI in the late-90s. Lost track of him after that.
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  #42  
Old 12 June 2018, 21:51
Fu King Lawyer Fu King Lawyer is offline
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always liked that guy.
I did too. He was part of those who made me what I am. I walked amongst giants.
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  #43  
Old 13 June 2018, 11:12
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Originally Posted by gwbarnes View Post
Interesting to see in the late 1970s they had ROTC only classes?

They did, indeed. In about 1974, as an ROTC instructor, instead of going to Bragg Advanced Camp for the summer, I went to Benning as a Ranger Class cadet evaluator, Each ROTC Ranger platoon had one of us ROTC Assistant Professors (Captains) attached as a cadet evaluator. We were not RIs or Tac officers, but were tasked to prepare an overall written evaluation on each cadet in our platoon. This was primarily focused on the cadets who did not tab, to determine if they would continue in ROTC.
[/QUOTE]

And if you thought tabbed E-3s or E-4s was not bad enough, can you imagine the attitude of a university ROTC cadet walking around campus with a Tab? "Yep, I am one bad ass liberal arts student".
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  #44  
Old 13 June 2018, 11:31
Gsniper Gsniper is offline
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I doubt that got him much ass in 1974. Not the Army's finest hour, PR wise.
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  #45  
Old 13 June 2018, 13:22
LSUinNL LSUinNL is offline
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Originally Posted by Fu King Lawyer View Post
I did too. He was part of those who made me what I am. I walked amongst giants.
I googled him based off your comment and wow he sounds like giant from a heritage of giants.


Quote:
Lt. Colonel Richard S. Schott, a native of Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Syracuse University and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, Infantry in 1954. In 1963, then Major Schott was Assistant Professor of Military Science at the University of Rhode Island, a post he held until 1966. After that assignment ended, he went to Fort Bragg, where he qualified as a member of the U.S. Army Special Forces.
On April 4th, 1972, Lt. Colonel Schott was serving as the Senior Advisor to the 4th RVN, (Tiger Division) Battalion Quang Tri Province when the post was attacked by North Vietnamese forces. During the course of the attack, Colonel Schott was grievously wounded, wounds which Lt. Col. Schott realized would prevent him from leaving the bunker from which he was resisting the assault. When it became apparent that the base would be overrun by the enemy, Colonel Schott ordered his subordinates to evacuate the bunker so as to give them a chance to evade capture. His subordinates, adhering to the time honored traditions that wounded soldiers are not abandoned to the enemy, refused to leave him. At this time, aware that his comrades would not leave as long as he was alive, and aware that the severity of his wounds prevented him from either personally attempting to evade the enemy or his subordinates from taking him with them, Lt. Col Schott took his own life in order to give his comrades a chance to avoid becoming prisoners of war. Lt. Col. Schott’s selfless act allowed two of his fellow soldiers to evade immediate capture, one of whom was able to reach friendly lines. Colonel Schott was awarded the Silver Star as a result of his actions.
In addition to the Silver Star, Lt. Col Schott was the recipient of the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Air Medal, the Army Commendation Medal, the Combat Infantry Badge (with star), and various other decorations.
The family of LTC Richard Schott continues to make their homes in the Shepherdstown, W. Va. Community.






Ranger Buries RVN service Father

COLUMBUS, Ga. - (KRT) - The father of a Fort Benning Ranger will be buried Wednesday, 32 years to the day that he was killed during his second tour of duty in South Vietnam.
The remains of Lt. Col. Richard S. Schott will be interred at Elmwood Cemetery in his hometown of Shepherdstown, W.Va., after a funeral Mass at St. Agnes Catholic Church.
For 1st Sgt. Christopher Schott of the 4th Ranger Training Battalion's Headquarters Detachment, the military funeral will bring closure to what has been a decades-long search for his father.
Christopher Schott, his wife Catherine and their three children are in Shepherdstown this week, staying with his mother, Joan Kartley, who has operated a women's clothing store there for the past 15 years.
Christopher had mentioned the search for this dad's remains, the many false leads and finally the chance, albeit a slim one, that DNA evidence would finally prove that bones found near Loc Ninh matched his father's, during a Ledger interview last spring.
"It's looking good," he said in May, as he helped raise money to bring the families of three Rangers killed in Iraq to Fort Benning for a memorial service. "Hopefully, we'll know something soon."
"Soon" became eight months.
But, after 31-plus years, what's another few months?
Tony Peregoy, a close friend of Chris Schott's, has followed the case as close as any non-family member could.
Here's what he uncovered recently:
Colonel Schott was killed during a North Vietnamese attack in Loc Ninh District, Binh Phuoc Province, Republic of Vietnam, on April 7, 1972.
Schott and seven other Army soldiers were serving with Advisor Team 70, Military Assistance Command, and manning a tactical operations center in 1972 when it came under attack by the North Vietnamese. The battle raged for two days until the North Vietnamese tanks broke the American defensive perimeter. Schott was the only one of the eight killed during the attack. Six of Schott's comrades were captured by the North Vietnamese. One later escaped.
Schott was reported missing in action in 1972. One year later, the family learned that he had been killed in action.
Capt. Mark Smith, who had been taken captive during the raid on Loc Ninh, reported upon being released that he had seen Schott "slumped over with a bullet wound to the head."
In 1989, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam repatriated to the United States 21 boxes purported to contain the remains for U.S. servicemen. Part of those remains believed to be associated with Schott's death were shipped to the Army's Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii. In 2000 and 2001, a re-survey of the Loc Ninh site unearthed other remains that were also sent to Hawaii.
Christopher Schott was stationed in Hawaii at the time. He visited the lab to see what he could find out about his father's remains. To his surprise, two of the men working at the lab knew his father. One had played lacrosse for him at the University of Rhode Island. The other served under Schott.
Armed with DNA evidence from Colonel Schott's brother Stephen, the Army went back to the Loc Ninh site, found other evidence, and matched the DNA sample with a jawbone found there.
The family was officially notified of the positive match in February.
The other Schott siblings are Cynthia Schott Cook of Shepherdstown, Susan Schott of Kearneysville, W.Va., Heather Schott of Martinsburg, W.Va. and retired Navy Seal Richard Schott of Kansas.
Christopher Schott said he was grateful to the tireless efforts of the Army to recover and identify the remains of servicemen around the world. "They took all these exhaustive measures to check and recheck making sure they had covered every base," he said. "This was an exact science and these people take handling the remains of our war dead very seriously."
Now, for a second time, April 7 becomes a very important date for the Schott family.
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  #46  
Old 13 June 2018, 16:41
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Originally Posted by LSUinNL View Post
I googled him based off your comment and wow he sounds like giant from a heritage of giants.
Not even the same era-Jeff Schott was a flinty eyed, lean hipped, barrel chested, sky diving junkie that paid for his habit by smoking the scunion out of RIP and Ranger Students. Completely different out of uniform...
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  #47  
Old 13 June 2018, 16:54
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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And if you thought tabbed E-3s or E-4s was not bad enough, can you imagine the attitude of a university ROTC cadet walking around campus with a Tab? "Yep, I am one bad ass liberal arts student". [/QUOTE]

Ran into a college ROTC student at Florida Junior College in 82 sporting a RANGER T-shirt.I was sitting with a newfound friend,a former SEAL that was in my Western Civilization class when we both noticed him.

I called out to him and motioned him over, then asked him what class he was in.

He said that he hadn't been, 'but was going soon'. Cole (formerSEAL) and I exchange looks and then I said, "Take off the Shirt, now".

He asked, "Who do you think you are? Why should I take off the shirt?"

I said, "My name is SGT Montcalm,(I was in A/3/11 SFGA, ODA314)formerly of 1st Ranger Battalion and I've earned the right to wear that shirt and you haven't. As to why you're going to take off that shirt- you can do it willingly and I'll even letyou turn it inside out so you don't have to walk around with your bird chest showing, OR I'm going to reach up your ass and rip it off through your mouth taking your heart and lungs with it."

A few people standing nearby watched the interchange and started staring at him.

I don't if it was the fact that I hadn't raised my voice, or the way I was looking at him, but he proceeded to do the fastest T-shirt change in history.
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  #48  
Old 13 June 2018, 20:35
Fu King Lawyer Fu King Lawyer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
Not even the same era-Jeff Schott was a flinty eyed, lean hipped, barrel chested, sky diving junkie that paid for his habit by smoking the scunion out of RIP and Ranger Students. Completely different out of uniform...
CSM,
That be the same "sky god" I remember, but I swear I remember his first name was "Chris". WTF, I am old and have lost most all of my recollection. You are probably correct.
v/r
fkl
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