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  #41  
Old 23 April 2011, 14:10
g6445v g6445v is offline
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Originally Posted by Silverbullet View Post
You need to look around for a thread where I describe the "long" and "short" resume. No one should be going through awards, medals or anything else to put together a resume.

Chronological is nice, but reading crap that happened 15-20 years ago is tiresome and doesn't attract attention in the manner that one thinks it does.

Listing all your training is a waste unless it's relevant to the job or is something that makes you look more well rounded.
there are many ways of doing a good resume...some work better than others...I transferred to 4 federal law enforcement agencies and one local PD using this format...now that I'm transitioning to the contracting industry I'm using the same format and for me is working...just yesterday a recruiter was asking I add more details to my resume, a week or so ago another recruiter from another company was telling me his supervisor thought my resume was too detailed, these two occassions were for the same type of position...
whenever my agency assigned me an applicant background investigation part of the case file is the applicant's resume, some had very long resume others had short bulletized resume...the point is that both formats had the right information to the extent my agency HR's office forward them for further on into the selection process...
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  #42  
Old 23 April 2011, 17:07
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The point is that most of your work was for federal agencies and they aren't too discriminating about how a resume is formated, or what it says as long as you meet the requirements. It is apples to oranges when talking about competing for HR's and/or a hiring managers attention for a private sector job.

What worked for you in finding whatever gig you end up is nice, but I and a few others on this thread have helped 100's get work in the industry you're just trying to break into and other industry's.

Our input is based on repeated experience, and our advice is based on what has been proven to be best practices, not what may have worked for one person.
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  #43  
Old 25 April 2011, 15:59
g6445v g6445v is offline
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...PM sent...

Last edited by g6445v; 25 April 2011 at 16:14.
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  #44  
Old 6 May 2011, 21:29
VcrusaderV VcrusaderV is offline
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I really appreciate all the help that I received (PMs and e-mails too). I have been TDY for a few days (still am) and now I am putting your tips to work. The biggest area that I am having trouble in now is "showcasing" some of the most important aspects of my career. I know that L3 and the subsequent positions that came from completing it is a HUGE deal and it will help get me a lot in getting a job, but I have no idea on how to articulate this... Any of you former SEALs/18 series have a good example of explaining this without going over the line/breaking security. I am guessing that you guys have key phrases or open code to explain things related to this field. If I can just write it out, please let me know what is excepted. USASOC has really drilled down on this area the last year.
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  #45  
Old 9 May 2011, 20:17
Rogueop Rogueop is offline
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TY SB

Thank you for the post! Very helpful!
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  #46  
Old 22 August 2011, 13:34
LIONRAMPANT LIONRAMPANT is offline
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I have a similar question as VcrusaderV in regards to articulating training and especially experience in a manner that does not violate OPSEC. I'm especially talking about 3 work. Any advice on what anyone has done in the past would be of great help. Thanks.
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  #47  
Old 22 August 2011, 14:05
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Hotmike Hotmike is offline
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One thing I always found helpful, was to take the Job Description (or requirements list) and tailor A resume to EACH POSITION you apply for... I have my "Generic 4 pager, with all the bells and whistles, but when I'm actually applying for a job, I cut and paste the listed Job requirements, and tailor a statement to each task/need.

I.E. - "Applicant must know MS Office, or Applicant must have experience with LINK-16 Data links" would be written

I have in depth knowledge of all MS Office applications to include yada yada
or
I have a functional knowledge of Link-16 datalinks operations

at least that way, you are addressing each point they are hiring on... if you at least list that you have SOME knowledge of the task, the SCANNER (electronic or human) will rate your resume as a "high hit" ratio, and call you to schedule and interview (which is where you sell YOURSELF) usually conducted by a manager and a tech lead who will ask you task specific questions (so do your homework).

and it always helps to know someone in the company you are applying to to "Champion" your resume with the HR geeks (who probably know nothing about the job you are applying for).

and QUANTIFYING your bullets with dollar numbers, resource savings, SAFETY effects and the like always goes further than saying "Been there; Done that"... Let them know how Doing That extrapolates into numbers (dollars and man hours).

Just my two cents, as a former "Combatant" who was told his skillset would be useless on the outside after I retired... (I've been out of work for a total of 3 days since retiring in 04).

HK
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  #48  
Old 5 September 2011, 21:30
Ron Flowers Ron Flowers is offline
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Request Advice on Private Side

Sirs,

I am recently returned from a very rewarding experience in support of OEF. A successful career in LE, largely in Narcotics and Criminal Investigations landed me a chance to contribute, via a LEP position with MPRI.

I am well home now, reacclimated, and looking for new challenges.

Seeking the honest, experienced feedback from anyone willing to review a resume and/or CV for suggestions. Am not looking for another year long deployment, as per the Mrs.

V/R,
Ron
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  #49  
Old 6 September 2011, 01:09
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mdwest mdwest is offline
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http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=103797

HTH...
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  #50  
Old 6 September 2011, 10:12
RegularGuy101 RegularGuy101 is offline
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Originally Posted by Hotmike View Post
and it always helps to know someone in the company you are applying to to "Champion" your resume with the HR geeks (who probably know nothing about the job you are applying for).

HK
Hey, why do we have to be geeks? Also, I strive to learn all the positions I am responsible for, mostly so I know who I should fire.

If you think about it, HR is not a bad industry to be in. As long as there are people working, there will be HR.
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  #51  
Old 6 September 2011, 10:26
Ron Flowers Ron Flowers is offline
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Recvd

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Thanks.....
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  #52  
Old 9 September 2011, 10:02
Spectre225 Spectre225 is offline
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I look at hundreds of resumes and one thing I would say is regardless of whether your resume is long or short address the specified job requirements up front. The position description should spell out the requirements pretty clearly. A recruiter weeds through tons of candidates and does not have the time to consider a non-qualified candidate or take a lot of time searching to see if you meet the reqs. You want to ensure your resume goes straight into the qualified pile. Good luck.
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  #53  
Old 9 September 2011, 10:43
Ron Flowers Ron Flowers is offline
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Thanks for your insight. Appreciate it.
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  #54  
Old 1 October 2011, 21:25
shootcentermass shootcentermass is offline
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Thanks for everyones contributions and special thanks to [silverbullet] for constructing the resume threads and offering the time needed for great info. Guys- for what it's worth- you're helping alot of us out- Thanks.
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  #55  
Old 25 November 2011, 00:43
Crucible guy Crucible guy is offline
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As someone who is recruiting right now, SB has the right advice, especially on the number of courses that repeat the same thing. Choose some courses that represent the training important for the job you are applying for. Look up the resume types on the Internet and take note, if you have excellent education, you might want to list that first. If you have experience, then maybe that goes first. Use your resume to show off your positive traits but proof read it. Typos, spelling errors etc are distracting when we are trying to classify candidates.

Guess what, there are several free resume sites on the Internet. We have seen all of them, some half completed and the phrase "your name here" still on the form. One other important part of the process, please do not write "see resume" on your application. It takes longer to look at you and classify you. If it is incomplete, we will pass you over.

CG
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  #56  
Old 26 December 2011, 15:51
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Chemical Chemical is offline
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Most of my work history is Army.

Can someone clarify for me, is it better to list each unit and position I had (They do differ slightly, however that could add an extra page to my resume) or should I attempt to consolidate it all under one entry as a Chemical operations specialist?
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  #57  
Old 26 December 2011, 23:39
Crucible guy Crucible guy is offline
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If the job has anything to do with your specialty and it makes a difference on basic qualifications, then take the extra time and space. As an example, right now we are reviewing resumes and applications for PSS positions, part of the requirements for this job from the client is that the candidate must have 3 years of protective operations experience. I have had resumes that show 14 months of being a corporal in the USMC, then a laundry list of jobs - truck driver, tower guard, clerk, etc. My job is to take that resume and find out how much of that time was tower guard, if I can use that to say he was protecting people, then it works to his benefit. The harder I have to work to pull this information out of a candidate, the less chance I can keep him in the pile to give him a job. In that case I had to write the candidate five emails to get him to break down his time for me. I really wanted to get him in the pipeline as he was a Socnetter. He was frustrated and kept telling me that he thought his resume was fine. He could see what he was trying to communicate to me, but I am required to document the time down to the months of service so that the client will approve the candidate.

Don't worry too much about having a longer resume. It used to be so important to have a one page resume, now it is more important to convey the information and get the job. I know I don't mind looking at a longer resume as long as the information is true and not baloney. Kind of like we were talking about in another thread, blocking an intersection three blocks off of the presidential motorcade does not count has high threat protective ops. Yes I get that one all the time too.

Having said that, look at the requirements for the position you are applying for and have two resumes in the hopper. If specific requirements are met by certain skills you had in different jobs, then submit the long form.

I hope this helps, either way you got what you paid for. CG

Last edited by Crucible guy; 26 December 2011 at 23:49. Reason: Typo
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  #58  
Old 27 December 2011, 08:30
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Tell me who the person is. We take issue with members applying for jobs they aren't qualified for or not making the effort to get their ducks in a row before applying.
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  #59  
Old 10 April 2012, 08:28
Crucible guy Crucible guy is offline
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New tip for those wanting employment. Not exactly on the resume issue though. Most companies have a database to house your information. That same computer system documents each time we contact a candidate through the system. Please do not write the recruiting manager for a company complaining that you applied for four jobs in the last year and have never received a reply to any of them.

It takes me about two seconds to pull his name up and hit the HISTORY button. I then have dates and times of every move that has been made with and about this candidate. I will respond professionally, but I will also support the recruiter when they are right and doing their job correctly. In that particular case, he had received five emails over the last year updating him and advising him of requirements etc. That is in addition to the automated reply from the web site.

NO HE WAS NOT A SOCNET GUY, but the number of demanding and poorly written emails we receive in the office is amazing. Be aware, you can be the best qualified, coolest operator in the world, but if I don't have an opening, I can't hire you. We do not mind answering questions or responding to emails, that is part of the job. Remember you are representing yourself and your abilities in every contact with the company.

Inability to complete an application, follow simple instructions or inability to talk on the phone and have a coherent conversation never looks good for a candidate. Take those opportunities to make yourself shine by being prepared and identifying yourself, the position you have applied for and then getting into the topic. It is very common for a guy to just start asking how long the training is, but not saying for what position. It may be clear in your mind, but we have over two thousand applicants in the pipeline at any one time. We have upwards of 50 different position classifications that we are recruiting for. Most have different qualifications and training requirements.

We want to get people employed, and we really want to employ veterans. Help us / Help you.

CG
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  #60  
Old 10 April 2012, 09:20
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Hoepoe Hoepoe is offline
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Some other very basic tips, but basic as they are, I receive many job applicants making these mistakes (i'm not hiriing, please don't PM me at this time):

* Spell check and proofread.

* If sending an unsolicited application to multiple companies, do NOT have everyone and their sister in the "to" or "cc" field. I want to feel that you want to work with me, not just at any job you can get, but where i work.

* If sending an email, write an opening, even if only a few lines. I really don't appreciate receiving emails with no text and only a CV/resume attached or "CV attached". Like written regarding the cover letter ; gain my interest, entice me into reading your resume/CV, but keep it short and to the point.

* I'm not your "mate", "bro" or "buddy" - doesn't happen often, but it happens.

* For the love of all that is good, format your CV/resume so that it's easy to read. If it's not easy to read and understand, i'm probably not going to read it.

Good luck folks

H
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