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  #581  
Old 21 March 2014, 21:03
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Originally Posted by MixedLoad View Post

I'll continue to get with my girls and shuttle/lift up to the top, then use my legs to pedal that monster through the park at speeds that create my own little Art of Flight.
You have to pedal downhill? You must be fat

I kid, I kid.
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  #582  
Old 22 March 2014, 10:03
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Originally Posted by Danno View Post
Mix Loaded...

Not trying to make this thread all about me and my woes but for an entry level cross country/groomed trail rider Nothing to specific or crazy. With that said what bike should I look into getting 1500-2000 is my budget. I was looking at Specialized Rock Hopper 29 or Stump Jumper 29. PM me if you want or we can dish this out in the open or if anyone else wants to chime in I'm all ears.
I think I'll give you the same advice I give everyone else - buy a used bike that's a year or two old. Your purchasing power will go through the roof.

One thing to do is to demo as many bicycles as you can. Check them out. See which one works for you. I won't even begin to turn this thread into a 26 vs 650b vs 29'er wheel size discussion because at the end of the day it's about personal preferences. The trend in the industry is certainly for bikes to be made in the latter two wheel sizes from now on but great bikes are to be had in all three wheel configs. That's all I'm going to say on that.

As an ultra runner and just based on your personality you're someone who enjoys suffering in a way that's incomprehensible to most people on this planet. That's great and I applaud you for wanting to continue that tread with a hard tail (HT) bike, but very seriously consider the benefits of a full suspension (FS) bike.

For one, it will be entirely more versatile and since you're able to lock out the rear shock with the flip of a switch (or lever, depending) the argument against FS is null and void. Bottom line is that you'll have an infinitely more capable bike that you can ride most anything with and enjoy it. The enjoyment can be derived from being able to go faster over sections that would bounce you off of your ride on a HT, as well as actually being able to more efficiently climb (which can often translate into "ultimately faster") on longer rides.

Mountain biking is about being social, IME. It's hard to express but not everyone makes a great riding partner. But when you find them then the world opens up and you begin knocking off rides left and right. My buddy Doug's like that. I think you may have met him. He and I have different riding styles but we can always agree on which trails and the whole process from waking up and grabbing breakfast to riding to the aprés at a brewery somewhere just make for epic stories.

You'll love it and so will your four legged best friend.

So go out there and read up, not so much on XC bikes, but on All Mountain/Enduro type bikes. You'll find that most new models will be decently equipped around $2k and the flagship models will be sitting around the $5-8k range. But remember, what's true for cars is true for bikes - once it leaves the dealer it takes a massive hit in "worth". So that $8,000 bike that two seasons ago was all the rage (and by all accounts will still be a killer bike for another 3+ years) will now cost you around $3k on the used market.

But you'll easily find tons of fantastic bikes that sold for around $5k a year or two ago that will be right at that $2k sweet spot now. Well maintained, configured, taken care of and ready for a new owner.

Good luck, bro, and anything I can do to help, don't hesitate to ask. Check for a PM with directions to my favorite market place for used bikes.
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  #583  
Old 22 March 2014, 10:28
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Just getting ready to take a 4 legged friend (German short haired pointer) out on a Bike Ride myself. First time since October.
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  #584  
Old 22 March 2014, 10:54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KidA View Post
You have to pedal downhill? You must be fat

I kid, I kid.
Hahaha.
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  #585  
Old 22 March 2014, 11:38
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As an ultra runner and just based on your personality you're someone who enjoys suffering in a way that's incomprehensible to most people on this planet. That's great and I applaud you for wanting to continue that tread with a hard tail (HT) bike, but very seriously consider the benefits of a full suspension (FS) bike.

For one, it will be entirely more versatile and since you're able to lock out the rear shock with the flip of a switch (or lever, depending) the argument against FS is null and void. Bottom line is that you'll have an infinitely more capable bike that you can ride most anything with and enjoy it. The enjoyment can be derived from being able to go faster over sections that would bounce you off of your ride on a HT, as well as actually being able to more efficiently climb (which can often translate into "ultimately faster") on longer rides.
I second this. FS is just way more fun to ride and doesn't beat you the hell up. I went to visit my brother in Long Island a couple of Xmas's ago. I have a FS bike and he has a HT. I went for a few rides on his HT and couldn't believe how beat up I felt after a ride compared to my FS, doesn't even compare. I was thinking about getting a HT for myself one day but after riding his I doubt I will ever go back to riding a HT.
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  #586  
Old 22 March 2014, 12:41
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  #587  
Old 22 March 2014, 13:00
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I did the FS thing a long time ago, before most I'd venture. While it had its merits (comfort and DH performance being the most obvious) what I couldn't bear was the weight and cost.
I switched to a HT with a good suspension fork and a quality seat. Cost didn't decrease by a lot (that money went back into forks, brakes and wheels), but ease of maintenance was a great relief. I also dropped 10 pounds of shock, pivots and gussets.
I ended up with a higher quality bike, that handled amazing, weighed <23 pounds, and was capable of being a better ride than I was a rider.

Fast forward a few more years, and my cardio isn't what it used to be (burned up my lungs, industrial), and I found that rides got shorter and shorter. So, in order to pack in as much entertainment in a <5 mile session, I started looking at Dirt Jumpers and Street Trials. I'm a bit old to take the hard landings (crashes), but I can still get some good flow at the local park on my Specialized P1. It's a cheaper, bombproof bike that I can toss into the weeds without fear of knocking some widget out of alignment, never to be fixed properly. It's also a single speed.
The downside, it weighs about 33 pounds. It's geared for torque, and the geometry is o.k., but you can't outride that weight. So...
I'm looking into a street trials bike. Single speed, rigid fork, strong wheels, awesome brakes, light @22 pounds. I can get a full day of jumps, spins, hops and crashes knocked out in an hour. I'm getting to lazy to jump, and my Jeep doesn't like to haul bikes to the park. I can get my fill of fun within 1/2 mile of my house.

I could watch this guy all day:
http://www.dannymacaskill.co.uk/videos/

It could be argued that this really isn't "riding," but spinning for hours on end doesn't (or can't) appeal to everyone.
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  #588  
Old 22 March 2014, 13:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MixedLoad View Post
I think I'll give you the same advice I give everyone else - buy a used bike that's a year or two old. Your purchasing power will go through the roof.

One thing to do is to demo as many bicycles as you can. Check them out. See which one works for you. I won't even begin to turn this thread into a 26 vs 650b vs 29'er wheel size discussion because at the end of the day it's about personal preferences. The trend in the industry is certainly for bikes to be made in the latter two wheel sizes from now on but great bikes are to be had in all three wheel configs. That's all I'm going to say on that.

As an ultra runner and just based on your personality you're someone who enjoys suffering in a way that's incomprehensible to most people on this planet. That's great and I applaud you for wanting to continue that tread with a hard tail (HT) bike, but very seriously consider the benefits of a full suspension (FS) bike.

For one, it will be entirely more versatile and since you're able to lock out the rear shock with the flip of a switch (or lever, depending) the argument against FS is null and void. Bottom line is that you'll have an infinitely more capable bike that you can ride most anything with and enjoy it. The enjoyment can be derived from being able to go faster over sections that would bounce you off of your ride on a HT, as well as actually being able to more efficiently climb (which can often translate into "ultimately faster") on longer rides.

Mountain biking is about being social, IME. It's hard to express but not everyone makes a great riding partner. But when you find them then the world opens up and you begin knocking off rides left and right. My buddy Doug's like that. I think you may have met him. He and I have different riding styles but we can always agree on which trails and the whole process from waking up and grabbing breakfast to riding to the aprés at a brewery somewhere just make for epic stories.

You'll love it and so will your four legged best friend.

So go out there and read up, not so much on XC bikes, but on All Mountain/Enduro type bikes. You'll find that most new models will be decently equipped around $2k and the flagship models will be sitting around the $5-8k range. But remember, what's true for cars is true for bikes - once it leaves the dealer it takes a massive hit in "worth". So that $8,000 bike that two seasons ago was all the rage (and by all accounts will still be a killer bike for another 3+ years) will now cost you around $3k on the used market.

But you'll easily find tons of fantastic bikes that sold for around $5k a year or two ago that will be right at that $2k sweet spot now. Well maintained, configured, taken care of and ready for a new owner.

Good luck, bro, and anything I can do to help, don't hesitate to ask. Check for a PM with directions to my favorite market place for used bikes.
Damn...I'm sure as hell glad I came around and found this thread. I'm also happy as hell to know you and to have this inside knowledge first hand from you and the others on here. I would have been that turd who bought some fancy Lance Armstrong Price Tag for a bike at some high end bike shop.

Thanks for the very crucial insight! As a newbie to MTB its a new world to me, its not like running where you just by a 100.00 pair of shoes and off ya go.

But yes I do like to embrace the suck when outdoors I think beating myself up earns a better award at the end of the trail or summit view (when mountain running) I'm weird like that.

I feel I need to have earn the trail's respect or beat the trail. So it makes sense that the same ideology will apply in MTB ....BUT..... there is no need for unnecessary punishment esp from equipment (Its like running up Pikes Peak or Longs bare foot....why?) so your right in saying FS is the way to go seems only right and smart!

Thanks a ton dude! and even more for the advice on used vs new!
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  #589  
Old 22 March 2014, 13:13
SpudWrench SpudWrench is offline
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When you get settled in CO, check out the classifieds in Pinkbike and KSL.
KSL is a Utah thing, but it is used thorough the intermountain west.
Good deals on 1-2 year old bikes, thanks to the "keeping up with the Jones" mentality around here.
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  #590  
Old 22 March 2014, 16:28
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Originally Posted by SpudWrench View Post
I did the FS thing a long time ago, before most I'd venture. While it had its merits (comfort and DH performance being the most obvious) what I couldn't bear was the weight and cost.
I switched to a HT with a good suspension fork and a quality seat. Cost didn't decrease by a lot (that money went back into forks, brakes and wheels), but ease of maintenance was a great relief. I also dropped 10 pounds of shock, pivots and gussets.
I'll smoke most guys on their sub 25# HT's with a FS bike that weighs 3-5 lbs more. Because what goes up must come down... I seriously can't think of one good argument to be made for a HT bike at this stage in the sport's evolution. The HT diehard's remind me of people who didn't want to use reflexive optics because their iron-sights "always worked".

Furthermore, the argument for weight is lost on me. Weight only matters if I can't adequately propel it. Since I'm not a 130# spandex clad energy gel swilling rider, I don't think those extra 3-5#'s I'll have from the FS bike are going to make a giant difference.

As for maintenance, it's so easy to work on bikes these days that you can do it at home without any specialized machinery or tools. Or you're lazy like me and you want to keep a LBS in business, so you take it to them and service it there a few times a season.

Pinkbike's the way to go though. That much we agree on.
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  #591  
Old 22 March 2014, 17:14
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Awesome bike picture removed because I'm jealous
Fair enough
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  #592  
Old 22 March 2014, 17:17
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Danno...I agree on your strategic placement in Boulder. You are absolutely correct.
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  #593  
Old 22 March 2014, 17:30
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You're bike is definitely the bomb - if you're tearing up the chutes on any of the numbers of ski resorts around here that go 4 seasons. Or if I were participating in one of the Chilean downhill races (find a video, it's insane).

For me, now, it's too focused. I really dug the Freeride movement a decade ago, but now those seemed to have petered out - too heavy to climb and too fragile to descend.

Every riding style has its perfect bike, and every rider has their own preference in style. As was mentioned before, pick the right bike for your style of riding, and don't be hypnotized into buying the latest and greatest.
MTBiking seems to be second only to archery in the marketing of the next big thing.
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  #594  
Old 22 March 2014, 20:46
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ML and any DH Rider,

Came across this tonight...is this your typical DH experience minus the ski lift up with chicks? If so I'm down dude I will just have to bring my big boy depends for the ride down

http://youtu.be/PLZl073iYII
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Last edited by Danno; 22 March 2014 at 20:51.
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  #595  
Old 22 March 2014, 20:53
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Originally Posted by Danno View Post
ML and any DH Rider,

Came across this tonight...is this your typical DH experience minus the ski lift up with chicks? If so I'm down dude

http://youtu.be/PLZl073iYII
Red Bull Rampage is the biggest organized event in free riding. The lines and airs are insane. I can't imagine riding those.

Here's a cool little teaser clip from a movie called "Arrival".
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  #596  
Old 22 March 2014, 21:07
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Nice Man!

Is this what your doing? Not trying to be silly with questions just trying to get a grasp on what "Down Hill" is. The vast amount of variables within the umbrella of MTB'ing is what I'm struggling with. Down Hill, XC, Trail, Enduro.... they all seem to be different but the same.
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Last edited by Danno; 22 March 2014 at 21:16.
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  #597  
Old 22 March 2014, 21:19
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Nice Man!

Is this what your doing? Not trying to be silly with questions just trying to get a grasp on what Down Hill is.
Downhill riding is focused solely on going down. There's no ups and downs. It's like downhill skiing and I absolutely prefer it.

Enduro Racing defined.

I usually keep two bikes - one for trail riding (AM) and one for having fun riding DH (trails or bike park).

The bikes are, as you've certainly noticed, very differently built because one of them is built as a gravity sled, with massive suspension, big brakes and is designed to take big hits, while an AM/Enduro bike can handle relatively hard DH riding but is also designed with the idea of getting you up the hill.

You simply can't ride a DH bike uphill to make it perfectly clear.

Here's a comparison between a Norco DH bike and their Enduro rig.





You can see the difference in geometry and suspension immediately looking at those bikes.

Anyways, DH is pure speed, gravity bound goodness. It's the ultimate thrill on two wheels as far as I'm concerned.

Here's a video to show DH biking. Places like Winter Park about 45 minutes from where you live offer "Lift Served" biking, which means that they use the chair lifts that run in the winter for skiers and boarders to help get you and your bike up to the top. And then, just like in the snow, you can hit the trails (beginner, intermediate, advanced, expert etc).

Or you can go to local DH trails and "shuttle" with your buddies. So one person for instance will have a truck, load up x amount of bikes in the back and drive everyone to the top of the trail. Everyone bombs down and you pick them up down there in the truck. Drivers switch and then you head back up. Repeat and off you go getting a few good laps in.

Whereas if you're riding on a normal bike you don't necessarily need a shuttle because you just drive/ride to the trailhead and start there. Then you ride your loop and come home.
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  #598  
Old 22 March 2014, 21:28
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And here's another to whet your appetite:
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9hvfYvqS-bE

Bring balls - big ones.

Note: this isn't me, nor will it ever be. I've done the runs in Park City on rented bikes, and that's about as crazy as I can afford.
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  #599  
Old 22 March 2014, 21:30
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Originally Posted by SpudWrench View Post
And here's another to whet your appetite:
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9hvfYvqS-bE

Bring balls - big ones.

Note: this isn't me, nor will it ever be. I've done the runs in Park City on rented bikes, and that's about as crazy as I can afford.
I love watching those races. They look like so much fun. I'd love to blast through a city from top to bottom.
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  #600  
Old 22 March 2014, 21:39
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And here's another to whet your appetite:
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9hvfYvqS-bE

Bring balls - big ones.

Note: this isn't me, nor will it ever be. I've done the runs in Park City on rented bikes, and that's about as crazy as I can afford.
Dude I shit my pants watching this! The Go Pro had me fooled in that he must have hit some poor spectator in the face with his back bike tire on some of the fast whips down the track.

Nice!


ML,

You broke that down nicely goggling all the variations can get overwhelming but I think I get it now with the first picture with the lower saddle allows you to stand up and with out the seat getting in your way since I assuming your standing up more for better front tire traction compared to the other picture but at the same time if seated you get more traction on the back end of things.

Example: what would the Leadville 100 MTB race be considered as? Trail? I only ask cause I'm racing in the Leadville 50 (foot race) this summer and the Leadville 100 MTB would be right up my alley.

I will have to link up with you to get some DH experience the linked video is awesome and hard not to be seduced into that type of style! esp the lift up with the chicks!
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Last edited by Danno; 22 March 2014 at 21:59.
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