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  #1  
Old 12 November 2018, 19:15
Look. Don'tTouch. Look. Don'tTouch. is offline
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Grinding teeth while sleeping.

Anyone suffer with this issue? Most of the time I'm not even aware I'm doing it. My wife tells me about it and says it's impacting her ability to sleep because it gets so loud.
They sell mouth guards at Walmart for $30 but I think I recall hearing bad things about those, that they alter your bite and lead to big dental problems.

Any advice is appreciated.
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Old 12 November 2018, 20:16
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Wife had this - Sign of stress. She had to wear a mouthguard for a while, but also got some medical help for stress, which helped to the point she no longer grinds her teeth.

Not saying you have stress - Have also seen this among hundreds of career drunks, to the point where having a dozen teeth-grinders in the drunk tank overnight would make an unholy echo throughout the cells.
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Old 12 November 2018, 20:37
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Old 12 November 2018, 21:06
Agoge Agoge is offline
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I have been doing regular dental visits for the past three years due to me having approximately $25,000 worth of dental issues due to grinding. I never really realized it until I had to go in with a broken tooth.

After several X-rays were taken, it was revealed that every tooth in my mouth was cracked in several places. Not only cracked, but my entire "bite" lost a 1/4 inch in depth due to grinding actually *shortening* the length of my teeth.

They actually told me to go to CVS, Walgreens, or Walmart to get a bite guard and that there are expensive ones out there that would work, but they really wouldn't do any better than the $30 ones from the aforementioned stores.

As much as she may not want to use one, I would tell her to do it anyway because it truly beats the alternative. As to causes, I am sure there are many...but, she said my *job* cost me the health of my teeth. So yes, I would say stress is a major cause of grinding.

My best wishes for her future dental health!
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Old 12 November 2018, 21:35
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I was on my way to destroying half my mouth. Use a guard now.
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Old 12 November 2018, 22:39
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I'm on mobile, so I will add later. Just something to keeping mind is that another possible reason for grinding or clenching teeth could also be sleep apnea.
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Old 13 November 2018, 02:54
Look. Don'tTouch. Look. Don'tTouch. is offline
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Thank you Agoge, for the good wishes. It's actually me that grinds, not her. I'm simply keeping her awake at night because apparently I'm so loud when I do it. It's good to hear a positive vote for the mouth guard. I have issues with sleep but not sure if it's sleep apnea.

Thank you for the responses. I'm not sure how rare or common this is so it's good to hear from anyone with any feedback on it.
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Old 13 November 2018, 11:20
PocketKings PocketKings is offline
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I started clenching my teeth during a high stress time 10 years ago and never stopped. Lots of broken teeth, then crowns, then broken crowns. Mine is not sleep apnea related - just my body's way of processing stress.

I sleep with a mouthguard, which helps the teeth cracking, but not the muscle pain. I see a big decline if I avoid alcohol before bed, avoid caffeine before bed, and workout in the evening.

Believe it or not, chamomile tea before bed and quiet meditation makes mine much better. Crazy, I know.

Best of luck. Hope you can rewire your brain and stop.
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Old 13 November 2018, 11:57
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Weightlifting has a way of doing that too, clenching, grinding
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Old 13 November 2018, 14:55
osubuckeye762 osubuckeye762 is offline
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I would say that I grind my teeth when I sleep about 1/2 the time.

I have noticed that I find myself periodically grinding my teeth when I am driving to Charlotte to start the work week or sitting at my desk overnight.

I have since started wearing a mouth guard when I am at the gym and I have also been researching mouth guards for running.

Heck my dentist told me she still grinds her teeth every so often.

I looked at getting a custom fitted guard and i think with insurance it was still going to be $389.
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  #11  
Old 13 November 2018, 17:04
Agoge Agoge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Look. Don'tTouch. View Post
It's actually me that grinds, not her. I'm simply keeping her awake at night because apparently I'm so loud when I do it.
Sorry about that my friend. I knew it was you, but I was on my "fire watch" duty with my new grandson and was a little foggy due to lack of sleep...

They do work though. I used one that was adjustable and only covered my rear teeth and prevent my front teeth from touching. I never had any problems with soreness, but it was amazing to see how bad I would destroy them in a weeks time and have to change them out. They are worth the effort if your are truly grinding.
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Old 13 November 2018, 19:33
UncleTx UncleTx is offline
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I've been using a grinding guard for about 8 yrs. Started off with an expensive one or two from the dentist. Now I get them off Amazon and fit them to my mouth after soaking in hot water and trim to fit.
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  #13  
Old 13 November 2018, 19:38
Stretch Stretch is offline
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I ground my teeth long before I was diagnosed with sleep apnea.

My dentist fitted me with a mouth guard. It looks like a retainer an orthodontist might prescribe to straighten teeth.

This link looks into connections between grinding and apnea.

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/slee...teeth-grinding

My grinding was/is stress related.

I still grind and wake up with a sore jaw.

v/r

S

ETA: and all of my original teeth!
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  #14  
Old 13 November 2018, 20:26
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LDT - I was grinding my teeth and had the symptoms of TMJ. While visiting my massage therapist I mentioned the grinding and how much the muscle on the left side of my face hurt - like it would never relax. It popped, locked and gave me headaches - there were days when I couldn't open my mouth wide enough to eat a PBJ (the horror). Anyway, she puts on some gloves and massages the muscle/tendon/whatever and gets the fucker to release. It took a few session but she finally got it to the point where it was relaxed and I could fix it myself. Haven't had any issues with it since. Good luck.
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  #15  
Old 14 November 2018, 02:44
Look. Don'tTouch. Look. Don'tTouch. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleTx View Post
Now I get them off Amazon and fit them to my mouth after soaking in hot water and trim to fit.
I've used similar devices in the past for training. This sounds like a nice fit without a big price tag of a truly custom prescription. Thank you.
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  #16  
Old 14 November 2018, 17:16
PocketKings PocketKings is offline
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By the way, crazy as it sounds, Botox injections into the jaw muscle works wonders for preventing clenching and grinding.
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  #17  
Old 14 November 2018, 18:08
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Dystonia could be a cause, though atypical, as used WRT the above.

When they wake up, can they open their mouth soon after awakening?

Jaw Screws=BAD.

That’s how old I am.
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Last edited by Expatmedic; 14 November 2018 at 18:18.
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  #18  
Old 14 November 2018, 18:32
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Another long-term problem with grinding teeth is they will "hollow out" and then become even more breakable. I had to have a few filled and capped for that reason.
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  #19  
Old 14 November 2018, 18:39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ramzmedic View Post
Another long-term problem with grinding teeth is they will "hollow out" and then become even more breakable. I had to have a few filled and capped for that reason.
IIRC, if that is the case, then pull the tooth or root canal.

I for sure could be wrong.
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Old 14 November 2018, 18:46
Stretch Stretch is offline
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When my dentist suggested I get the retainer, he said the retainer or a root canal in the future. Your call!!!

I’m still blessed with all 28 God gave me. He was nice enough to not give me any wisdom teeth.
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