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  #1  
Old 7 May 2013, 21:43
krustykrab krustykrab is offline
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Anyone Gardening Organic?

Does anyone else on here grow their own food?

I started gardening last year when I got back from Afghanistan. I get a lot of satisfaction out of growing some of my own food and working in the garden really puts all of that restless energy to use. Out here in San Diego we can grow year round. I am currently growing corn, onions, chives, carrots, snap peas, green beans, lima beans, bell pepper, banana pepper, jalapeno pepper, eggplant, cucumber, watermelon, 3 varieties of tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and strawberries. I also have a 2x4 raised bed with just about any leafy green you can think of.

What are you guys growing?
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  #2  
Old 7 May 2013, 21:48
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What size is your garden?
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Old 7 May 2013, 21:48
Gsniper Gsniper is offline
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I've got cabbage, broccoli, onions, turnips and potatoes in already. Here in the blue ridge mountains, we don't put in the beans, peppers and tomatoes until after mother's day. I built my wife a greenhouse over the winter and she's got a pile of stuff ready to go in once the frost danger is over. I live on 18 acres so as the wife and I work less and less, we garden more and more.
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Old 7 May 2013, 21:56
krustykrab krustykrab is offline
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I rent so I am pretty limited to what I can do. I wish I could have some land of my own. I have a 2x4 raised bed, a 4x4 raised bed with about another 5x5 of tilled earth. All my tomatoes and strawberries are in big pots in the driveway. I make do with the space I have, but the watermelons and cucumbers might get interesting. Gsniper, I think when I retire I would like to start my own farm, organic veggies "farm to table" is on the rise down here in Socal so who knows what will happen in the next decade.
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Old 7 May 2013, 21:58
Gsniper Gsniper is offline
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Look into the hanging pots for tomatoes. It's a good way to grow a lot of stuff with very little space used. You can also terrace your cucumbers and squash and save a lot of space, get them growing up instead of out and you save tons of dirt space for other things.
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:09
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We live on a 40 acre farm, consequently we have plenty of room for a vegetable garden. I fenced in an area 25 x 40 ft for my wife's garden.

We have multiple flower gardens near the house.
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Old 8 May 2013, 12:34
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Originally Posted by krustykrab View Post
I rent so I am pretty limited to what I can do. I wish I could have some land of my own. I have a 2x4 raised bed, a 4x4 raised bed with about another 5x5 of tilled earth. All my tomatoes and strawberries are in big pots in the driveway. I make do with the space I have, but the watermelons and cucumbers might get interesting. Gsniper, I think when I retire I would like to start my own farm, organic veggies "farm to table" is on the rise down here in Socal so who knows what will happen in the next decade.
Cattle panels or chicken wire makes great trellis' for cucumbers and peas; I use bamboo pole 'teepees' to grow pole beans.

You can use the '5 gallon bucket pyramid' to grow tomatoes, cucumbers, or any thing else; stack the buckets so that the rims of the second and third levels are resting securely on the buckets below; drill holes in the SIDES of the buckets about 1/2 inch above the bottom so that excess water drains into lower buckets, then out the bottom at the side instead being trapped under the lowest buckets.

see attachment
Attachment 23806

you can stabilize them by sinking a 2 x 4 into the ground behind each end, create 'cross bars' then putting a screw from inside the bucket into the cross bars to hold it all together.
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Last edited by RGR.Montcalm; 13 March 2014 at 09:00.
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:01
krustykrab krustykrab is offline
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I will look into that!
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:19
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Don't fall for the upside down tomato...

Tomatoes should be companion planted with basil. They complement each other remarkably.

Find a worm farm and buy the bags of worm castings they sell. A side benefit is the earthworm eggs castings contain.

"The Three Sisters" (corn, squash, and pole beans) grow very well together from the same mounds. Google "3 sisters gardening" if you're not familiar with it.
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Old 8 May 2013, 09:23
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Google "3 sisters gardening" if you're not familiar with it.
Thanks for the three sisters tip.

Carrots also go well with tomatoes, I put some in last weekend.

I have a 40x25' spot for my vegi's.

Half of it is for tomatoes, twenty plants, but I do a lot of canning for sauces, and salsa.

I've tried a lot over the years, but this year I'm down to: tomato, eggplant, jalapeno, habanero, cucumber (that I'm growing upright this year instead of having them crawl on the ground) squash (butternut, acorn and straightneck) and zucchini.

My gardens been tiled, soaker hoses buried, and black carpet down to limit/control weeds. My back and knees are getting too old to be doing much weed pulling. One of the best investments I've made over the years.

I put most of what I am growing in around the first week of June.

Tick, tock, tick, tock.....
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Old 8 May 2013, 12:50
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My gardens been tiled, soaker hoses buried, and black carpet down to limit/control weeds.
I elevate my soaker hoses so they spray down onto the plants; I elevate them on 1" PVC pipe 7' long driven into the ground, drill a hole in the top about 1/2" from the top, then zip tie the hose so that it sprays down.

Less erosion from 'melting' the rows
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:04
Gsniper Gsniper is offline
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They're kind of backwards, the plant comes out the bottom. The redneck style is just a 5 gal bucket of potting soil with a hole cut in the bottom, then you stick the plant in the bottom, keep it watered and let er' rip.

I bought this 18 acres when I was an E3 in 1986. Instead of the Mustang or the crotch rocket, I bought dirt. Sure am glad I did it now. After my 20 I moved out here and went feral.
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Old 11 May 2013, 21:33
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Originally Posted by Gsniper View Post

I bought this 18 acres when I was an E3 in 1986. Instead of the Mustang or the crotch rocket, I bought dirt. Sure am glad I did it now. After my 20 I moved out here and went feral.
I didn't waste any money as a young Marine but I sure as hell wished I had bought land back then (mid 80's). I am looking now and and it is near impossible to find a descent 5-10 acres the way I want it even with 50 grand cash in hand.
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:28
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I always grow my own tomatoes, or did, until I moved to San Diego. I've had success with them in the ground and in the hanging bags back east.

I don't get enough goddamned hot sunny weather here to grow them. Last year I got a few piddly grape tomatoes out of the four vines I tried planting.
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  #15  
Old 7 May 2013, 22:32
Azatty Azatty is offline
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I don't get enough goddamned hot sunny weather here to grow them. Last year I got a few piddly grape tomatoes out of the four vines I tried planting.
Have you tried a grow light or greenhouse? I have just the opposite problem-- it gets too hot too quickly. We were at 103 last week, FFS. My poor tomatoes don't stand a chance until October.
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:35
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Have you tried a grow light or greenhouse? I have just the opposite problem-- it gets too hot too quickly. We were at 103 last week, FFS. My poor tomatoes don't stand a chance until October.
I think I planted them too early last year, right in time for 60 days worth of May Grey and June Gloom - i.e., no sunshine for two months.

I may try planting seedlings in July and see how they fare.
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:41
Azatty Azatty is offline
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I may try planting seedlings in July and see how they fare.
I have some homeless, hardened-off heirloom San Marzano seedlings if you want one. I'll be in San Diego at the end of this month either for a trial or to goof off and could leave one at the hotel desk for you.
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  #18  
Old 7 May 2013, 22:44
foxcolt13 foxcolt13 is offline
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I have tomato's planted and planning to plant some mustard and turnip greens next,I haven't decided what all I will grow this year. I like gardening alot. I'm also going to grow a spice garden on the deck. I have been reading some about the Heirloom seeds lately which from what I understand reproduce seed that can be planted the next year as opposed the seeds that you buy at most stores like Lowes and such that do not reproduce seeds that can be grown. I'm no expert on this so if anyone has any knowledge they want to share on this I would appreciate it. I want to be able to save seed that can be used to plant again next year.
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Old 7 May 2013, 22:57
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I have tomato's planted and planning to plant some mustard and turnip greens next,I haven't decided what all I will grow this year. I like gardening alot. I'm also going to grow a spice garden on the deck.
Look into growing amaranth. Highly nutritious, and it grows fine in poor soils.

Quote:
I have been reading some about the Heirloom seeds lately which from what I understand reproduce seed that can be planted the next year as opposed the seeds that you buy at most stores like Lowes and such that do not reproduce seeds that can be grown. I'm no expert on this so if anyone has any knowledge they want to share on this I would appreciate it. I want to be able to save seed that can be used to plant again next year.
If it says "hybrid," it's a one-time deal. Forget saving seeds. I can explain it genetically if you want, but that's the short answer.

Heirlooms are non-hybrid.
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Old 7 May 2013, 23:14
Azatty Azatty is offline
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I have been reading some about the Heirloom seeds lately which from what I understand reproduce seed that can be planted the next year as opposed the seeds that you buy at most stores like Lowes and such that do not reproduce seeds that can be grown.
http://www.victoryseeds.com/

You can also find heirloom seeds at most nurseries. I did see Beefsteak tomato heirloom seedlings at Home Depot last week.
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