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  #81  
Old 15 July 2013, 09:23
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theWookie theWookie is offline
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Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
You could start them now- just buy 3-4 sweet potatoes- let them begin to sprout, cut them them into cubes and let them sit a couple of days to allow the cuts to 'scar' them plant them.

They will grow untill it is too cold then go domant until next year and put out more vines.

They can be grown in a trash can or inside some old tires.

Start with 2 tires or 1' of soil inside a trash can; plant the sprout and when it get 12" tall add 6" new soil, covering 6" of the plant.

End of the growing season, dump out can or remove tires and the potatoes are inside.

You can also cut access hole in either and harvest potatoes without killing the plants...
Nice, thank you CSM. Love sweet potatoes, and so does my son. I bet they are good for canning. I'll be picking some up today on my way home.
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  #82  
Old 19 July 2013, 09:52
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GirlwithaGlock GirlwithaGlock is offline
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Didn't want to start a new thread for this but have a question: has anyone tried a vertical garden and could share their experiences? Specifically, I am looking at this link and it seems like a very cool idea, especially for herbs.
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  #83  
Old 19 July 2013, 10:25
Azatty Azatty is offline
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Originally Posted by GirlwithaGlock View Post
Didn't want to start a new thread for this but have a question: has anyone tried a vertical garden and could share their experiences? Specifically, I am looking at this link and it seems like a very cool idea, especially for herbs.
I worked on a similar idea for my backyard but didn't implement it. I concluded that for a small space vertical food garden, hydroponics was the way to go. Vertical gardens like the one in the picture grow houseplants and herbs just fine, but vegetables generally need more soil than a mason jar holds.
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  #84  
Old 19 July 2013, 10:51
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GirlwithaGlock GirlwithaGlock is offline
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Thanks, Azatty. I have run out of windowsill space for my plants, so the vertical garden seemed like the next logical step.
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  #85  
Old 19 July 2013, 11:20
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Do you have an outside wall that you can lean a wooden pallet against?

You can use a couple of 'reclaimed' wooden pallets in much the same manner as a windowbox.

The key to success is having enough space dedicated to soil by placing slats 'harvested' or gardening cloth from one of the pallets to create the bottom of the soil containers.

Once you have the pallet configured you can discard the remnants and lean the pallet against the side of you house/apartment...

Here is a link to one technique-

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/organi...b_1638489.html
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  #86  
Old 19 July 2013, 11:28
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GirlwithaGlock GirlwithaGlock is offline
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Thanks for the link, Rgr Montcalm. I don't have any outside walls, unfortunately, this is just an indoor project. I should be able to get enough sunlight in the room; my main concern is putting the brackets up without damaging the heck out of the walls. I could probably use the same idea of a leaning shelf though, didn't think about it!
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  #87  
Old 19 July 2013, 11:49
tooslow tooslow is offline
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I am a HUGE believer in drainage holes as opposed to stones in the bottom....
For whatever that is worth.
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  #88  
Old 19 July 2013, 11:49
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GirlwithaGlock View Post
Thanks for the link, Rgr Montcalm. I don't have any outside walls, unfortunately, this is just an indoor project. I should be able to get enough sunlight in the room; my main concern is putting the brackets up without damaging the heck out of the walls. I could probably use the same idea of a leaning shelf though, didn't think about it!
Here are some ideas to use with your Mason jars

http://www.target.com/p/threshold-15...Fenm7Aod3gkAQQ


http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...UBMAI&dur=1962


I've built stuff from the Ana White page- easy to follow instructions- here it is

http://ana-white.com/2010/07/plans/leaning-wall-shelf
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  #89  
Old 19 July 2013, 11:53
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Thank you very much!
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  #90  
Old 19 July 2013, 19:54
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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Well, here's our modest garden. Poor soil to begin with. We started about 3 yrs ago. Added tons of horse, chicken and bunny poo.

This year has been a bumper crop for zucchini, cukes, beans, peas, scallions & garlic. Our tomatoes are a different story.

Jap beetles are a huge nuisance. Good thing the chickens love to eat 'em. The resultant egg shells are rock solid.

IMG_3373a.jpg

IMG_3368a.jpg

IMG_3363a.jpg
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  #91  
Old 21 July 2013, 00:12
RGRJN RGRJN is offline
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This year I'm growing the counties biggest deer feeder .
I decided that with my limited growing space, I would concentrate on 3. White acre peas,squash and tomatoes. Next year I'll probably do October beans. That way I'm growing enough to put up. In years past, we did all kinds of diffrent beans/peas/peppers that would come in a diffrent times, almost enough for a meal, or too much, but not enough to put up. I decided to put up 1 a year and rotate.That way I have enough to put up/eat with limited space. I do a lot of canning. Course squash and tomatoes will be an every year thing, gonna try vaccum packing and freezing this year with the squash.
Darn deer are eating green tomatoes. Guess I'll have to thin the herd a little. Dang I hate that.
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  #92  
Old 5 August 2013, 08:18
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Got out in the garden this weekend after coming back from a business trip. Coming along nicely:

Have many Acorn squash:


I was disappointed with the number of Butternut Squash I had last year, but I'm very happy with what I'm seeing this year:


For the first time I used cages with all my peppers, and I am very grateful that I did. We've had a lot of heavy rain this season and the soft ground and heavy peppers don't mix well. Going to be a bumper year, this is one Jalapeno plant of five:


Some baby Habero's:
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  #93  
Old 5 August 2013, 08:23
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I've got twenty Viva tomato plants and each one has 25 - 30 tomatoes on it, they are all grown out of their 5' cages -- but still green though:


Sweet pumkin for pumkin pie:


Very happy with the vertical cucumber method, first time I've tried that. This monster in the picture is over a foot long and thick like a beer can:


Big Picture:
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  #94  
Old 5 August 2013, 08:25
tooslow tooslow is offline
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Originally Posted by RGRJN View Post
This year I'm growing the counties biggest deer feeder .Guess I'll have to thin the herd a little. Dang I hate that.
We are watching a young spike horn buck grow strong on our apples and gardens.
Even a joking comment about 'taking him out' drew a huge frown from my sweetie.
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  #95  
Old 5 August 2013, 09:11
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bigmiska bigmiska is offline
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I did a layered raised bed for blue and red potatoes using leaves and dirt and seems to be working here in VA.
kids freak over blue and pink french fries...
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  #96  
Old 6 August 2013, 06:43
RGRJN RGRJN is offline
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Originally Posted by tooslow View Post
We are watching a young spike horn buck grow strong on our apples and gardens.
Even a joking comment about 'taking him out' drew a huge frown from my sweetie.
Same here ........until they got in the roses and day lilies. Then she asked me "Didn't you say you wanted a new bow?"
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  #97  
Old 6 August 2013, 08:37
tooslow tooslow is offline
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Same here ........until they got in the roses and day lilies. Then she asked me "Didn't you say you wanted a new bow?"
Naw... my wife won't roll over.
Besides; to be perfectly honest, both of us like to have the deer around. I highly doubt that I would shoot that buck.
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  #98  
Old 6 August 2013, 08:47
GourmetMarine GourmetMarine is offline
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Does anyone know how to grow cilantro? All my herbs are doing great but the cilantro keeps dying. Does it need it's own pot and does too much rain effect it?
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  #99  
Old 6 August 2013, 09:25
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Fofo Fofo is offline
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I grow cilantro, GourmetMarine... You might be overwatering it. Cilantro roots don't take well to standing in water. So, I would say maybe increase the time between watering them, as well as ensuring you don't soak the soil.

Hope this helps!
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  #100  
Old 6 August 2013, 09:42
GourmetMarine GourmetMarine is offline
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Thanks Fofo!
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