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  #1  
Old 28 December 2018, 16:41
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leopardprey leopardprey is offline
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Going light

Now that getting older, and not required to be humping spare linked 7.62, common gear, claymore, Demo, batteries etc - I want to go as light as I can whether a day hike/hunt or overnight excursions.

Good articke just read on the "overweight infantry":

https://mwi.usma.edu/the-overweight-infantryman/


So always looking for light weight gear. Also of course trying to get excess body weight down helps also. Less pack and body weight we carry when hunt or hike, less tear on the body = a more enjoyable hunt/hike.

Yesterday took one of my custom mchale and company packs have had for over 25 years, and took a hot knife to it. Removing buckles, webbing, straps, etc that I never use, not really needed.

Weighed all the excess discarded stuff. 2.4 pounds!

We use to have a saying way back in my Boy Scout days. 1 ounce x 1 mile = 1 pound. Encouraging one to cut weight of their pack.

I am going all Colin Fletcher now, weighing everything.

With food and water, 30 pounds is the maximum I want to go. For a 2-3 overnight, I really strive for a pack under 25 pounds. Winter, 30 pounds.

Days of the 65 pound ruck, while wearing hard sole jungle boots, is long gone.
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Old 28 December 2018, 17:23
Gray Rhyno Gray Rhyno is offline
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How do you balance weight vs comfort? How much comfort are you expecting/looking for at 30 lbs?

I agree with you about traveling light, especially at our ages, but I don't know how uncomfortable I'm willing to be.
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Old 28 December 2018, 17:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray Rhyno View Post
How do you balance weight vs comfort? How much comfort are you expecting/looking for at 30 lbs?

I agree with you about traveling light, especially at our ages, but I don't know how uncomfortable I'm willing to be.
I can be very comfy at 30 pounds, especially in warm weather.

Down sleeping bag, light weight ruck, freeze dried food, coffee, Hammock or light weight tent, good ground pad/mattress, etc.

I find a smaller ruck is also a key element. Not only does the ruck weigh less, but smaller size force you to pack less. We have a tendency whether a pack, car, or house to fill to maximum capacity with stuff. A ruck itself should weigh no more than 4 pounds. With new light weight rucks such as Ospreys Levity one can get comfort and support in just around a two pound ruck.

I agree, I want comfort also. My days of freezing or trying to prove I am hard or making through some sort of Selection or starving in the woods are over.
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Old 28 December 2018, 18:05
wowzers wowzers is offline
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Might check out some of these backpack hunting forums for tips. We are always trying to lighten up going in because we're hoping to come out heavy. The biggest places to save weight are on your pack, shelter, and sleeping bag. I have always wanted one of those McHale packs. Was in contact with him several years about designing one for me but I never did pull the trigger.
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  #5  
Old 28 December 2018, 18:12
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Originally Posted by wowzers View Post
Might check out some of these backpack hunting forums for tips. We are always trying to lighten up going in because we're hoping to come out heavy. The biggest places to save weight are on your pack, shelter, and sleeping bag. I have always wanted one of those McHale packs. Was in contact with him several years about designing one for me but I never did pull the trigger.
I own three of his Packs, and bought one for my brother as well. Things I like and don't like about them. He is a really good guy to deal with though, and does things old school style. They are really overbuilt , so a bit on the heavy side though. But his construction/sewing is bomb proof.
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Old 28 December 2018, 18:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray Rhyno View Post
How do you balance weight vs comfort? How much comfort are you expecting/looking for at 30 lbs?

I agree with you about traveling light, especially at our ages, but I don't know how uncomfortable I'm willing to be.
Ruck. 3 pounds
Tent. 5 pounds
Sleeping bag. 3 pounds
Ground pad 1 pound
Stove - jetboil. 1 pound
Food 5 pounds
Water 2 quarts 4 pounds
Sweater 1 pound
Jacket 1 pound
Hat/gloves 1/2 pound
Torch 1/2 pound
First aid kit. 1/2 pound
Pocket knife 1/4 pound
Toothbrush/paste 1/4 pound
Spare socks 1/4 pound
Toilet paper/wet wipes 1/4 pound
iPhone (sigh...if you must. But can use as camera.) 1/4 pound
Map, compass, matches 1/4 pound

27 pounds

Add Glock 19X loaded~2 pounds.

29 pounds.

Ditch the tent for a Hammock and a rain fly and shave off two pounds.

Go with a Ultra light pack such as Ospreys levity pack, shave off another pound.

So now down to 26 pounds.
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Last edited by leopardprey; 28 December 2018 at 18:30.
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Old 28 December 2018, 18:26
Gray Rhyno Gray Rhyno is offline
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Maybe we need to meet halfway and get in a hike this summer.
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Old 28 December 2018, 18:43
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There are long distsnce throughhikers that have their base weight (minus food/water) in the 7-10lb range.

It ain’t cheap though.
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  #9  
Old 28 December 2018, 18:48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KW Driver View Post
There are long distsnce throughhikers that have their base weight (minus food/water) in the 7-10lb range.

It ain’t cheap though.
There is a book on the PCT I have, written by a former Engineer, that does the mathematical equations. Showing how with the weight of your shoes - how by decreasing the weight you can add extra miles per day with the same expenditure of energy and reducing time. Same with the weight of your ruck. Common sense, but he does the math which is pretty cool.
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Old 28 December 2018, 18:51
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Originally Posted by KW Driver View Post
There are long distsnce throughhikers that have their base weight (minus food/water) in the 7-10lb range.

It ain’t cheap though.
Definitely doable in the warmer months. Also availability of water is a key factor on ruck weight. Carrying one quart of water vs a gallon. I know there are some hikes in southern Indiana like portions of the knobstone trail that there are no good water resupply points, for a day or two.

There are some of these companies like Superior Wilderness, Waymark, and Gossemer making rucks that weigh 1.5 pounds. Feathered Friends has 900 fill bags that are super light weight. But as you said very expensive.
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Old 28 December 2018, 19:20
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This dude has great info.

https://pmags.com/dirt-bagging
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  #12  
Old 28 December 2018, 20:00
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The light- and ultralight-hiking world is crazy, it's easy to get sucked in; and as KW Driver says, can get expensive.

If you don't know of him, Google Ray Jardine, who was in at the front end of the trend.
http://adventuresportsjournal.com/ra...erness-travel/

And somewhat tangentially but also a good read, look up Mark Twight's Extreme Alpinism for value/wt decision-making and also moving efficiency tips.

Cool stuff!
DaveP
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Old 28 December 2018, 21:27
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Rent.

I rent whenever I need something I wouldn't want to lay coin down for and use rarely.
Did that very thing the last time I backpacked and the last time I had some important photos to take.
Place outta AZ for the pack. And Lensrentals for camera gear every time.
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Old 29 December 2018, 18:43
AKAPete AKAPete is offline
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I have the wide range from heavy to light. I pack according to what I plan on doing.

The one thing I don't have is a tent. Never use one even in the winter. Generally hammock camp in the winter with a carbon fiber closed end tarp. Have down bottom and top quilts.

Plan on through hiking the AT when I retire in three years. Just starting to prep now.

Was section hiking a part of the AT in NC a few years back and ran into a south bound ultra light hiker in November. I really wished I would have asked him what he was carrying because his pack was way smaller than an assault pack. Since I was heading home in the morning I gave him a few bags of trail mix - and he had no trouble fitting them in. Dude just floated along.
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Old 29 December 2018, 19:34
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Originally Posted by AKAPete View Post
I have the wide range from heavy to light. I pack according to what I plan on doing.

The one thing I don't have is a tent. Never use one even in the winter. Generally hammock camp in the winter with a carbon fiber closed end tarp. Have down bottom and top quilts....
Brand/source of the tarp?
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Old 29 December 2018, 20:37
Armitage12 Armitage12 is offline
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If this is winter, then your jacket is 'on' you and you don't have to count it. You're not counting your other clothes.

I run a UCO Air headlamp that snuggles into a fleece hat. That thing is ridiculously light (1.5 oz) and doesn't live in the pack, just on the head through the hike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leopardprey View Post
Ruck. 3 pounds
Tent. 5 pounds
Sleeping bag. 3 pounds
Ground pad 1 pound
Stove - jetboil. 1 pound
Food 5 pounds
Water 2 quarts 4 pounds
Sweater 1 pound
Jacket 1 pound
Hat/gloves 1/2 pound
Torch 1/2 pound
First aid kit. 1/2 pound
Pocket knife 1/4 pound
Toothbrush/paste 1/4 pound
Spare socks 1/4 pound
Toilet paper/wet wipes 1/4 pound
iPhone (sigh...if you must. But can use as camera.) 1/4 pound
Map, compass, matches 1/4 pound

27 pounds

Add Glock 19X loaded~2 pounds.

29 pounds.

Ditch the tent for a Hammock and a rain fly and shave off two pounds.

Go with a Ultra light pack such as Ospreys levity pack, shave off another pound.

So now down to 26 pounds.
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Old 29 December 2018, 20:46
DaveP DaveP is offline
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Brooks-Range Mountaineering used to make tarps, monomids, tube-tents made of sil-nylon; packed tiny and light. Also made conversion kits for skis>litter, for rescue hauling.
Don't seem to have much on their website anymore; also curious as to what tarp AKAPete likes.

DaveP
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  #18  
Old 29 December 2018, 22:02
AKAPete AKAPete is offline
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Originally Posted by firstshirt View Post
Brand/source of the tarp?
Weights on the different sizes are at the bottom.

If you use a hammock and want "light in the cold" this is the way to go.

Link

For the AT I'm going to drop the down quilts and go with this combo - bottom quilt and this for a top

Tad heavier than down but works a lot better if it gets wet.

DaveP - I am not the most graceful thing getting out of a hammock - more a bit of thrashing around. Being rather large I also sag a bit. In a blowing rain I take a poncho and rig it under the bottom quilt. Looks like crap but keeps my butt dry.

Last edited by AKAPete; 29 December 2018 at 22:11.
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  #19  
Old 29 December 2018, 22:26
AKAPete AKAPete is offline
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For those who are wondering how you (at least me) sleep in a hammock in 15 degree weather.

Trek hammock with Jacks or Better down top and bottom quilts. And a regular poncho liner.

In really cold weather your breath frosts up the area around your head - making the top quilt wet after a few days.

I've found that rigging a poncho liner to your ridge line with a short piece of line holding up the area around your head stops the frost and keeps a little warn area around your head. The fly would be mounted on top of the ridge line.

Pull the poncho liner over after you get in.
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  #20  
Old 30 December 2018, 00:05
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Liking the Custom Quilts made by Enlighted Equipment. Great weight savings compared to using a sleeping bag
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