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  #1  
Old 21 October 2018, 11:44
RemTech RemTech is offline
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Umbilical Hernia

Went to the doc for a regular checkup and he confirmed what I suspected, umbilical hernia. So am researching the procedures and recovery times etc. Was wondering if anybody here has had this type and how the repair went, time off work, healing time, pain mgmt. I'm almost positive when this happened but didn't feel any pain just a noticed my stomach being bulged out while doing leg lifts. Thx for the input.
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Old 21 October 2018, 12:59
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Had it happen to me last March and just got it fixed at the beginning of September. I also didn't have any pain with it. I work overseas so I had 42 days to get it fixed and since I do work overseas I took it easy because I needed to return to work. I might have pushed it harder if I didn't need to come back.

I had a day surgery and was in and out in no more than 4 hours, maybe less. The part coming home is kind of foggy. I don't even remember seeing the surgeon after the surgery. I was completely off pain meds within 10 days. Was still a little sore after that but it wasn't a big deal. I have no issues now and am back to working out. Did lose some fitness though.
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Old 21 October 2018, 13:07
Chesie Chesie is offline
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There are a lot of variables involved in answering your question. The critics ones needed to give you good advice are:
1. How much do you weigh, and how tall are you?
2. Do you smoke?
3. How big is the hernia?
4. Have you ever had surgery near your belly button before?

Feel free to PM answers, if you don't want to throw them out there for all to see.

Good luck,
Danny
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Old 21 October 2018, 18:39
Fu King Lawyer Fu King Lawyer is offline
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You might find interesting reading in this thread.
http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=97471&page=3

Mine involved the Doctor inserting scopes and inflating my stomach then putting in the mesh.
Some lessons learned from mine:

Start the stool softeners several days before and figure out the amount that works best for you. You will be plugged up following the procedure and no matter whether you take pain pills or not.

Have a couple bottles of magnesium citrate in the cabinet and if you aren't going by day two, use some of it per label.

Do not strain, learn to put a folded towel over your stomach and push gently with the palm of your hand if you have to strain. You don't want to damage anything while you recover.

Take the advice of 1RiserSlip in the above thread and work back into things slowly.
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Old 21 October 2018, 18:40
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I have a horror story regarding an umbilical hernia. Matter of fact...I better not scare you with it.

Good luck!
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Old 21 October 2018, 18:51
Doctor_Doom Doctor_Doom is offline
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Listen to the AD 61J above. We usually consider this a minor procedure but individual mileages can vary significantly.
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Old 21 October 2018, 19:01
RemTech RemTech is offline
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Hey Chesie

6-1 - 270 (fatass) was around 240 when I remember it happening. Haven't had a smoke since 2012, no idea ho big the fucking thing is but have never been cut in the belly.
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Old 21 October 2018, 20:29
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I had the laparoscopic hernia repair with mesh back in 2008. No issues since then but there are 32 titanium tacks holding it in place. I think he kept me off work 12 weeks?
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Old 22 October 2018, 01:05
Lima Lima is offline
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Back in the day, I had the same MOS as Chesie.

Of course, that was 20 years ago.

Laprascopic umbilical hernia repair is the standard for our general surgeons. The patients routinely do well, including performance athletes. Following the post op instructions of your surgeon is a critical factor in how well things turn out.

That and if you're a smoker, stop now. Stay stopped even after surgery.

With any luck, you'll be yet another guy who shows up 2 years after surgery unable to remember exactly when he had it done or who did it for him.
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Old 22 October 2018, 09:20
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Originally Posted by Doctor_Doom View Post
Listen to the AD 61J above. We usually consider this a minor procedure but individual mileages can vary significantly.

Wish you would post more, Doc.

Terry
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  #11  
Old 22 October 2018, 22:55
Chesie Chesie is offline
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Originally Posted by RemTech View Post
Hey Chesie

6-1 - 270 (fatass) was around 240 when I remember it happening. Haven't had a smoke since 2012, no idea ho big the fucking thing is but have never been cut in the belly.
At your weight, and I mean no offense by this, your biggest risk factor for recurrence of the hernia is weight and the stress that abdominal obesity causes on the sutures holding things together after surgery.

As far as the operation is concerned, if you have a really small hernia, containing just some fat from your abdominal cavity, my first advice for patients is to first lose some weight. In your case, that means getting off at least 50 lbs before the operation. You should have had a CT scan done by now, that shows what, exactly, is hiding within your hernia sac. Even with a small hernia, the risk of recurrence approaches 20% at 5 years, with the best possible repair.

If your hernia is larger than, say, thumb size, then the risk of recurrence goes up considerably with any repair, and it remains surgeon choice whether the repair is done open or laparoscopically, as described above, using a piece of mesh. Weight loss before surgery becomes even more important, because at bigger-than-thumb-size, the standard of care is to repair the hernia with a piece of mesh in adults.

If your hernia contains a piece of your bowels within it, then you are at higher risk for bowel obstruction, and time is not on your side. I try to encourage these patients to lose weight quickly, but if that isn't possible, you are truly rolling the dice with surgery and mesh placement. Bigger hernias carry a much, much higher risk of recurrence, especially in the face of abdominal obesity.

I know this is going to be tough love, but here are the numbers and what the standard of care in surgery is today. Your body mass index is 36.5, which puts you into the severely-obese range, roughly 75lbs over ideal body weight. With a small, tumb-size hernia, repair incurs a 20% risk. With a bigger hernia, the risk of recurrence approaches 50%, at 5 years. If you can lose 50lbs, and get your BMI down to 30 or less, your risk of recurrence with a small hernia is down to 5%, and a large hernia 10%.

If that kind of weight loss isn't possible on your own, which is understandable, and time is on your side (i.e. the hernia just contains abdominal fat), most surgeons recommend weight loss surgery, like a sleeve gastrectomy, followed by definitive hernia repair after you have lost your excess weight. With a larger hernia, the above still holds true, with the caveat being that developing a bowel obstruction will necessitate hernia repair prior to weight loss, with the knowledge that the hernia may recur.

On the civilian side, my specialty is weight loss surgery, and a week never goes by that a general surgeon doesn't send me a patient in consultation that is in your same boat. In the old days, surgeons would just operate on patients with hernias, no matter what the risk factors may be. But, in the modern age we now enjoy, most surgeons understand that fixing a hernia, without first minimizing the risk of recurrence, is ultimately not in the patient's best interest.

And when I use the word recurrence, please don't take that to mean that the hernia pops back open, requiring another small operation to fix it. Recurrent ventral/incisional/umbilical hernias are a completely different creature. The second hernia repair is invariably much larger than the first, containing nettlesome scar tissue that increases the risk of bowel injury, and generally has much less-satisfying results. You want to have it fixed right the first time, and everything you can do before surgery to minimize the risk of recurrence ultimately benefits you the most.

Again, if you have specific questions that you don't want to air on the forum, feel free to PM me.

Good luck,
Danny

Last edited by Chesie; 22 October 2018 at 23:01.
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  #12  
Old 22 October 2018, 23:22
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Expatmedic Expatmedic is offline
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I wish our physicians posted more. There is so much they can teach.
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Old 23 October 2018, 01:19
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I wish our physicians posted more. There is so much they can teach.
Absolutely. I would also like to add my fiasco happens to only 1 in a few thousand but yet I was that guy. Its generally a routine surgery. Mine was outpatient and I felt fine going hone. The Pysiomesh they used didnt agree with me.

Follow your post op instructions. If any complications arise at all call your Doctor or go back to the ER and have the Doc on call page him/her.
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Old 24 October 2018, 13:31
57Medic 57Medic is offline
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Good advice as been given here. I would only add that any procedure, however small or large (Laparoscopic or Open) carries risk.

Since the original work done at MGH by Dr. Codman in the 1800's, to current surgical databases (NSQIP, the national surgical quality Improvement program and TQIP, the trauma quality improvement program) the rate of complications remains around 30%
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Old 25 October 2018, 02:29
Doctor_Doom Doctor_Doom is offline
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Wish you would post more, Doc.

Terry
Good to see you Terry.
If there's one thing I've learned, is that I don't have much to contribute, that someone else can't do better. Better for me to just read more, post a lot less.
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Old 25 October 2018, 08:59
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Good to see you Terry.
If there's one thing I've learned, is that I don't have much to contribute, that someone else can't do better. Better for me to just read more, post a lot less.
While that might make make sense to you, it doesn't make sense to me. You have friends here who look forward to your posting.

And Nancy says Hi.

Terry
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Old 26 October 2018, 23:49
Doctor_Doom Doctor_Doom is offline
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And Nancy says Hi.

Terry
Please give my best to Dr. A!
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  #18  
Old 28 April 2019, 23:15
Stretch Stretch is offline
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I was diagnosed with one yesterday.

Is it still an outpatient procedure?
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  #19  
Old 29 April 2019, 08:53
Chesie Chesie is offline
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Quote:
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I was diagnosed with one yesterday.

Is it still an outpatient procedure?
Usually, yes it is done as an outpatient. There are some exceptions, but for routine umbilical hernias, you go home the same day.
Good luck.
Danny
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  #20  
Old 29 April 2019, 13:52
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Soot Soot is offline
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I was diagnosed with one about a year ago at my annual physical. I knew that "something" was up beforehand because my belly button is all fucked up so I brought it to doc's attention. Doctor looked it over and told me that if there was no pain or any other issues with the area, then repairing it was really more cosmetic than anything else. The herniation isn't "large" (by my standards, anyhow); it doesn't protrude above my "belly button divot", for lack of a better term. I figured that "cosmetically" the 35 extra pounds I'm carrying is more an issue than a kinda dicked up belly button so there was no pressing need to have it repaired. Saw my doc again a couple weeks ago for this year's physical and he told me basically the same thing. My question is: is my doc giving me a bum steer or does his recommendation comport with what the docs on this board would recommend. Again, no pain, swelling, discomfort, or anything like that. Doesn't seem to have increased in size since last year. The only real issue I have with it is that it's abnormal.
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