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  #21  
Old 18 April 2011, 08:13
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The War of American Independence: Military Attitudes, Policies, and Practice, 1763-1789- Don Higginbotham

I once became totally absorbed in this war, and think the aforementioned is the definitive text.
X2. Higinbotham is a true authority, and follows the rules of real historiography, too.
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  #22  
Old 18 April 2011, 12:51
Gray Rhyno Gray Rhyno is offline
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The Minute Men: The First Fight: Myths and Realities of the American Revolution by John Galvin
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  #23  
Old 20 April 2011, 17:04
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Nice thread. My 9yo daughter has a project due on the Revolutionary War, she chose Nathan Hale (with some help ), kind of got me on that tangent. I'll check these out.
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  #24  
Old 4 May 2011, 17:11
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Found 1176, This Glorious Struggle on Amazon. Found the journal on Albris for 75 (low enough I didn't think it was outrageous for a one off printing in the 70's). All of them should be here by the end of the month.
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  #25  
Old 10 May 2011, 13:07
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Well, the journal got here yesterday. I'll start in on it when I get five minutes too. The twins are driving us nuts.
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  #26  
Old 17 May 2011, 10:35
pirana pirana is offline
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Originally Posted by Geronimo82 View Post
Well, the journal got here yesterday. I'll start in on it when I get five minutes too. The twins are driving us nuts.
Have fun with it. I like the part, postwar, when the Colonel walks into a crowded inn. His reputation preceded him, and he heard the mumblings in the crowd when the inn patrons recognized him as the Hessian warrior he was: "goddamn."

What's cool is, he blends in after the awkward moment. The new US countrymen just accept that these conscripts, and their British counterparts, are there on US soil until they ship out of Manhattan.

The journal is a unique look at things that we don't normally get.
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  #27  
Old 19 May 2011, 10:25
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The Pennsylvania Navy, 1775-1781 The Defense of the Delaware. by John W. Jackson.
Rutgers University Press 1974. Out of print now but you can still find copeis on e-bay and Amazon.com.

Its a pretty in depth account of the Battle of Ft. Mifflin, the Battle at Fort Mercer (where the Hessians under Von Donop were slaughtered) Ben Fraanklins' Chevaux De Frieze in the river and how the gundalows of the Pennsylvania Navy kept Admiral Lord Howe out of Philadelphia long enoough for Washington to get his Army into winter quarters at Valley Forge. I had an ancestor, a member of the Pennsylvania Navy, who took part in the sinking of the HMS AUGUSTA in the river, Capt. Daniel Joseph Murphy of the gundalow "EAGLE". Included in the work is a pretty good descrription of the petty politics involved during the Revolution.
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  #28  
Old 25 May 2011, 16:32
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Two cents from the back bench

Professor Higginbotham passed away in 2009. An obituary is available here.

Robert Middlekauf's The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 remains the 'standard work' on the topic. (IMO, like other volumes in the Oxford History of the United States, it does not discuss operational and tactical issues in sufficient depth.)

One should not neglect John Shy's A People Numerous and Armed: Reflections on the Military Struggle for American Independence.

FWIW, I'm fond of The War for America, 1775-1783 by Piers Mackesy. This work focuses on the War of American Revolution in its global diplomatic and military contexts.
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  #29  
Old 2 September 2011, 13:51
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I just read Bernard Cornwell's book "The Fort". It's about the Penobscot Expedition. In his usual style, Cornwell develops some historical characters into a very readable book. As a Canadian, I might find the read different from American perspectives on this battle, but I still think it is worth your time to read. One of the character's goes on to be instrumental in the founding of the 95th Rifles, which Cornwell's Richard Sharpe fought with.
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  #30  
Old 6 October 2011, 11:21
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Sigaba, thanks for posting the link to his obituary. I did not know that. I had the good opportunity to know Prof. Kohn, its author, for awhile. He wrote a good one there. Kohn's writing on the civilian-military relationship is wll-worth reading as well.
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  #31  
Old 15 October 2011, 20:17
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After I read 1776 I was left yearning for more on Washington and stumbled onto George Washington And Benedict Arnold: A Tale of Two Patriots by Dave Richard Palmer. A great read if you are looking for a background on GW compared and contrasted to BA.
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  #32  
Old 16 November 2017, 19:23
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Prelude to the American Revolution

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/quartering_act_1774.asp
The law is quite an easy read. I was surprised to see an online reference to David Ammerman's "study," attributed to him as done in 1974, that concluded that the quartering of British troops in private homes was a myth. The 1774 law begins, paraphrased, "in case any of you ever doubted[,]" there are often occasions for troops to be billeted in ways not first understood under the quartering act of 1765. The 1774 law makes it clear that British military authorities could demand quartering and, if not provided, barns, out-buildings could be taken and refitted for use. The payment allowed still had to be paid by the colony. The Quartering Act was just one of many laws that were coming from England at a rapid pace and none of which were subject to any input by the colonies at all.
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  #33  
Old 17 November 2017, 19:42
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Valley Forge, To Try Mens Souls and Victory in Yorktown, by Newt Gingrich and William Fortschen. Very well written historical fiction. I'd rank it with Shaara's work
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  #34  
Old 18 November 2017, 20:35
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Prelude to the American Revolution

http://totallyhistory.com/the-continental-army/
I think it is interesting that the Continental Army was largely made up of New England troops. The Massachusetts colony authorized a Continental Army in April 1775. It would seem that they must have done that after the battles of Lexington and Concord on the 19th, so they jumped right on it and got things going. In June '75, the Second Continental Congress searched and found George Washington, a surveyor with some military experience.
If you have never visited both Colonial Williamsburg and Old Sturbridge Village, it is perhaps difficult to grasp the amazing differences in the quality of living conditions between Massachusetts and Virginia at about the same time period. Williamsburg says it is 18th century and Old Sturbridge Village is said to represent 1780 to 1830 Massachusetts. Close enough, I believe.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=colonial+williamsburg&qpvt=colonial+willi amsburg&FORM=IARRSM
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=old+sturbridge+village&qpvt=old+sturbridg e+village&FORM=IARRSM
In a nutshell, virtually everything in Massachusetts had to do with survival. Time and money were not spent on "pretty." Take a look at the pictures of the farms. A house, a barn, and an out-building or two. The larger towns differed little, except that there were more of the farms and they were closer together, since larger land holdings were broken up into smaller ones as generations inherited the land. The British Parliament wrote the Quartering Act, but the Quartering Act did not create unoccupied homes or unused buildings. So how does one get a bead on what the availability of unoccupied homes or buildings was? How about looking at the estimated population?
https://web.viu.ca/davies/h320/population.colonies.htm
The estimated population in Massachusetts in 1730 was 114116. That's 100 years after the population was just over 500. But then in 1740, it jumped to 151613. In 1750 it jumped to 188000, 202600 in 1760 and by 1765, the year of the Quartering Act, perhaps about halfway to the 235308 of 1770. With that kind of influx of people, it is silly to think that there were unoccupied houses or unused buildings anywhere, especially in Boston.
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  #35  
Old 5 February 2018, 13:05
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Papa Smurf View Post
"This Glorious Struggle" - letters by George Washington.

Amazing insight into the life of the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army...
Downloaded this after your recommendation, and was not disappointed. Fascinating info on GW inner thoughts, and trepidation. Also highlighted the austere conditions the continental endured "make sure the men have straw to lay upon, if available"

Great choice! thank you Papa Smurf.

Also downloaded 1776 for later!
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  #36  
Old 5 February 2018, 14:14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Realist View Post
The Hornet's Nest, by Jimmy Carter
I generally loathe the politician called Jimmy Carter, but I have to admit that he did an excellent job with that book.

A couple of other non-fiction works that might come in handy regarding the southern campaigns:

The Day it Rained Militia by Michael Scoggins; and

Partisans and Redcoats by Walter Edgar.

The Revolutionary War in the Carolinas and Georgia was an expansion of a pre-existing sporadic armed conflict between coastal elites and lower class free whites descended from freed but impoverished indentured servants in colonies farther north who had illegally migrated south into the foothills of the Appalachians without permission or title to their lands from colonial officials on the coast. Both sides of that conflict took advantage of the Revolutionary War to settle scores. That is why when the British army departed from the colonies after Yorktown, the war effectively ended in the 10 northernmost colonies but raged for another year and a half in the south without the involvement of any British, French, or Hessian soldiers.
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  #37  
Old 5 February 2018, 14:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colmurph View Post
The Pennsylvania Navy, 1775-1781 The Defense of the Delaware. by John W. Jackson.
Rutgers University Press 1974. Out of print now but you can still find copeis on e-bay and Amazon.com.

Its a pretty in depth account of the Battle of Ft. Mifflin, the Battle at Fort Mercer (where the Hessians under Von Donop were slaughtered) Ben Fraanklins' Chevaux De Frieze in the river and how the gundalows of the Pennsylvania Navy kept Admiral Lord Howe out of Philadelphia long enoough for Washington to get his Army into winter quarters at Valley Forge. I had an ancestor, a member of the Pennsylvania Navy, who took part in the sinking of the HMS AUGUSTA in the river, Capt. Daniel Joseph Murphy of the gundalow "EAGLE". Included in the work is a pretty good descrription of the petty politics involved during the Revolution.

That whole area is a shit hole now. But the history of that area is amazing.
My dad and his siblings were born in Cooper's Hospital in Camden which was the Cooper's Ferry area during the period your talking about Murph. Cooper's Ferry was created by an ancestor of mine, the first William Cooper (according to the history books) to settle in that area to provide a ferry back and forth between PA and NJ. My grandfather, my dad, and I all carry the same name. Its pretty cool. Somewhere in that mix there we are all cousins with the current actor that is a Cooper. Brad ? Cooper....He and my grandfather were born in the same town.
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  #38  
Old 7 February 2018, 02:30
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Check out Newt Gingrich and his George Washington series.

He also has other historical fiction based on extensive research for the Civil War and Pearl Harbor. I thoroughly enjoyed them.
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  #39  
Old 7 February 2018, 05:07
Paul85 Paul85 is offline
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Books I enjoyed:

Prelude to Independence: The Newspaper War on Britain, 1764-1776 by Arthur M. Schlesinger
Becoming Men of Consequence: Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War by John A. Ruddiman
The Minute Men: The First Fight: Myths and Realities of the American Revolution by John R. Galvin
Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788 by Pauline Maier
George Washington’s Great Gamble: And the Sea Battle that Won the American Revolution by James Nelson

A nice take on the American Revolutionary War was Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America by Linda K. Kerber.
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  #40  
Old 7 February 2018, 06:33
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267 videos at https://www.c-span.org/search/?searc...tionary+War%22
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