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  #141  
Old 19 July 2018, 09:48
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Polypro Polypro is offline
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Originally Posted by MikeC2W View Post
So the debate: I was telling a pal that doing the old school weights and workout is fucking awesome. I can definitely see some gains BUT even cooler is it's such a throw back to days of badassery.

His response: Yeah, I can get the same from just doing pushups.
There's no debate. Muscle is composed of 3 different types of muscle fibers (1 slow and 2 fast) but can be generalized into just slow and fast. Slow-twitch fibers can be generalized as 'Endurance' fibers, and Fast-twitch fibers as 'Strength/Power' fibers.

Pushups primarily hit the endurance fibers - you have a really light weight (your body weight minus whatever % the feet are taking) and you are doing very high repetitions. This can not stimulate the fast twitch fibers except for very new trainees that experience a novel stimulus. Even if you are morbidly fat, as you lose fat, you are actually DE-creasing the load in that movement. You obviously can improve on pushups, but you are just increasing the resistance to fatigue, not the amount of force your pecs (and tri's/delts) produce.

You need progressive overload (increasing weight) to gain muscle size (hypertrophy) and strength (beyond CNS adaptation). Now, you *could* do that with the pushup if it wasn't such a hard exercise to load - because weighted pullups/chinups *do* increase size and strength... but getting enough weight on your back (which, because of the feet taking load, requires A LOT more than with pulls/chins) is almost impossible.

Then there's the obvious - if what he says is correct, people would just do pushups and be winning competitions. His Calves do thousands of repetitions per day, ask him how much bigger they are since... he was 18?

But body-weight stuff is awesome - DO IT ALL. And you can most certainly be wicked ass fit and look wicked ass awesome doing a wide variety of body weight stuff, so if you don't care about (as much) size/strength, you'll still get a little bigger and a little stronger - everyone has their own personal goals.

Last edited by Polypro; 19 July 2018 at 09:54.
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  #142  
Old 19 July 2018, 10:12
Durable Durable is offline
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Join Date: May 2018
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Poly,
Fantastic, great explanation. For me I find that doing push-ups is great all day. When I do "heavy" lifts I follow up every set within 3 minutes with "speed" exercises, jumping jacks, double ended punching bag, anything to change from the heavy lift to a more functional, (for my lifestyle), movement. Age 58, moderately broken.
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  #143  
Old 19 July 2018, 11:08
Gsniper Gsniper is offline
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Quote:
moderately broken
That's most of us at this point. With two shot knees and a jacked up back I have no intention of carrying around a set of 25" guns. I'm just adding stamina and dropping lard.
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  #144  
Old 19 July 2018, 11:13
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MikeC2W MikeC2W is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polypro View Post
There's no debate. Muscle is composed of 3 different types of muscle fibers (1 slow and 2 fast) but can be generalized into just slow and fast. Slow-twitch fibers can be generalized as 'Endurance' fibers, and Fast-twitch fibers as 'Strength/Power' fibers.

Pushups primarily hit the endurance fibers - you have a really light weight (your body weight minus whatever % the feet are taking) and you are doing very high repetitions. This can not stimulate the fast twitch fibers except for very new trainees that experience a novel stimulus. Even if you are morbidly fat, as you lose fat, you are actually DE-creasing the load in that movement. You obviously can improve on pushups, but you are just increasing the resistance to fatigue, not the amount of force your pecs (and tri's/delts) produce.

You need progressive overload (increasing weight) to gain muscle size (hypertrophy) and strength (beyond CNS adaptation). Now, you *could* do that with the pushup if it wasn't such a hard exercise to load - because weighted pullups/chinups *do* increase size and strength... but getting enough weight on your back (which, because of the feet taking load, requires A LOT more than with pulls/chins) is almost impossible.

Then there's the obvious - if what he says is correct, people would just do pushups and be winning competitions. His Calves do thousands of repetitions per day, ask him how much bigger they are since... he was 18?

But body-weight stuff is awesome - DO IT ALL. And you can most certainly be wicked ass fit and look wicked ass awesome doing a wide variety of body weight stuff, so if you don't care about (as much) size/strength, you'll still get a little bigger and a little stronger - everyone has their own personal goals.
Fucking BINGO. This guy is just a total windbag contrarian, kind of a pain in the ass about these things.

Thank you.
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  #145  
Old 27 July 2018, 14:06
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pondwater pondwater is offline
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Originally Posted by Polypro View Post
Resistance training is the #1 best thing you can do for Insulin Sensitivity - Metformin is a last resort
I've run a little self test on this the past few weeks. With the limited data I have collected you are 100% correct.

The way my schedule is I do my workouts at night. I test my blood sugar every morning. My diet and levels of physical activity during the day is very consistent.
Average blood sugar following rest or light lifting day is 108-110 the next morning. Following a heavy for me workout it is 98-100.
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  #146  
Old 27 July 2018, 15:41
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Polypro Polypro is offline
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Originally Posted by pondwater View Post
I've run a little self test on this the past few weeks. With the limited data I have collected you are 100% correct.

The way my schedule is I do my workouts at night. I test my blood sugar every morning. My diet and levels of physical activity during the day is very consistent.
Average blood sugar following rest or light lifting day is 108-110 the next morning. Following a heavy for me workout it is 98-100.
That's cool. Also, there is something called "Dawn Effect", where the Liver, via Glucagon from the Pancreas, releases blood glucose (glycogen) on it's own, in the morning. Morning readings, even fasted after sleep, can be high because of it. HbA1c is always the best tracking metric, but you may want to check blood glucose ~3-4 hours after your breakfast and see what it is - it might be even lower than the AM reading.

And... the more muscle you build, the more receptors to receive that glucose! Weights (Hypertrophy) RULEZzzzzzz!!!!

GLUT4 nerdery: https://www.google.com/search?ei=wXR....0.ToewClcUc94
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