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  #21  
Old 8 September 2011, 12:16
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B 2/75 is telling you what I said to do in my first post.

Get a different adapter and plug the drive in.
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  #22  
Old 8 September 2011, 14:46
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In my experience, that clicking (AKA, Click of Death) is usually the head actuator on the drive getting lost and committing magnetic suicide.

1. The freezer thing has worked for me in the past, but it's very hit and miss. More miss than hit.

2. Replacing the PCB board (that's the green circuit board under the drive) with a new one from EXACTLY the same drive (manufacturer, model number, size) has also worked for me on occasion.

3. Calling a hard drive repair/data recovery service is also an option. Google "hard drive data recovery florida" to find one near you. An evaluation of the drive usually costs between $0 - $100. Look for a business that has a "Nothing recovered, no charge to the customer" policy. Finally, find out if they have a clean room on the premises. I personally prefer if they do the work onsite rather than shipping it out to have the work done. Depending on the importance of the data it might be the best way to go.
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  #23  
Old 8 September 2011, 15:09
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Since I didn't hear the drive spinning or hear that clicking sound when I reconnected it after taking it out of my freezer, is it even worth trying that adapter? Since the adapter is less than $10 I'm willing to give it a try if you all say it is worth it.

Also, when I removed the outer case I noticed what I'm guessing was condensation on the hard drive. Don't know how it got there since I sealed the bag tight. Is the drive pretty much fucked since some condensation got in there?
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  #24  
Old 8 September 2011, 16:27
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The condensation on the outside of the drive is ok. Obviously, it should be dry before any electritcy is applied to it.

Getting a drive adapter for $10 is worth it. If nothing else, you'll have one if you ever need it in the future.

Using a different adapter is helpful - you haven't had a way to diagnose the drive or the adapter at this point. The "click of death" COULD be the adapter sending a partial signal to the drive so it doesn't spin -up all the way, etc. On the other hand, your drive could still be hosed.
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  #25  
Old 8 September 2011, 19:12
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Thank you for all the help, gentlemen. I really appreciate it. I'll let you know if that adapter works.

Edit: One more question. The adapter that B 2/75 linked to is for a 2.5" drive. Will that work with this drive? I saw one on eBay(that I'm not buying) that says it's for 2.5" and 3.5". I looked on Western Digital's website to see what size drive this is and it doesn't say.

Last edited by Kip; 8 September 2011 at 19:24.
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  #26  
Old 8 September 2011, 21:46
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What's the model number?
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  #27  
Old 8 September 2011, 22:15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ComputerForensicGuy View Post
What's the model number?

WDBACW0010HBK

It's a 1TB Western Digital My Book Essential.
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  #28  
Old 8 September 2011, 23:46
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The WDBACW0010HBK is a SATA drive inside. The connector size is the same for 2.5" or 3.5"

The adapter B 2/75 linked will work with the drive in your enclosure.

As an aside... if the drive is fucked, don't destroy the enclosure while you're taking it apart. You can buy almost any other 3.5" SATA drive and replace it and still have an external HDD if that is still good.
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  #29  
Old 9 September 2011, 00:21
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As an aside... if the drive is fucked, don't destroy the enclosure while you're taking it apart. You can buy almost any other 3.5" SATA drive and replace it and still have an external HDD if that is still good.
Unfortunately it wasn't easy to open and I had to pry my way in. I don't think it can be reused.

I've found just some enclosures for sale on newegg.com(like this one). Can I just buy any 2.5" SATA and put it in a new enclosure?

Would it end up being cheaper, or is it not worth the trouble?
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  #30  
Old 9 September 2011, 03:19
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It can be cheaper, but not appreciably. Usually better to get a warranty, etc than build your own... Now, if you're a nerd and have drives laying around all over the place... Buying a few $10 enclosures isn't a bad investment.

The small stand alone WD external drives thatare about the size of a deck of cards are just a 2.5" drive with a SATA to USB bridge inside the case and they are pretty cheap at places like Costco.
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  #31  
Old 13 September 2011, 14:01
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Unfortunately, it didn't work. I plugged it in and a removable disk appeared in my computer, but when I click on it to open it I get a message that says to insert a disk into removable disk (E:).

Oh well. I have an adapter in case this happens again.

Edit: Forgot something. On the adapter there is an extra USB plug that goes from the one you plug into the computer. Any idea what it's for? There were no instructions in the package.
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  #32  
Old 13 September 2011, 14:04
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Edit: Forgot something. On the adapter there is an extra USB plug that goes from the one you plug into the computer. Any idea what it's for? There were no instructions in the package.

Power.

One USB cable is for data and the other is to get more juice from the computer for the drive.
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  #33  
Old 13 September 2011, 15:57
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Try again with both USBs plugged into the computer. Like GackMan said, its for power. If your attempt was with only one of them plugged in, it might have failed to operate for ya based simply on that one issue.

Good luck.
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  #34  
Old 13 September 2011, 22:06
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Got the same 'insert a disk' message.

Again, thanks for all the help, gentlemen.
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  #35  
Old 13 September 2011, 22:19
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You didn't really get into how valuable the data was... but if you want to set up a replacement, consider instead of a single USB external drive, going with a dual drive networked NAS. Almost as easy to set up as the USB external, but with two drives you have the option of setting them up as a RAID 0, meaning the drives are clones of each other, updated continuously. Should one die, simply pull it out and slam in a new one (same make / capacity) and it can automatically update itself. The enclosure will cost about 120 clams, a pair of terabit drives are what, 65 each, and you plug the whole thing into your wireless router with a bit of network cable.

You can then watch movies off your NAS wirelessly on the laptop on the sofa, etc. Stream music to wireless speakers on the back deck and in the garage or basement via your smart phone, etc.
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  #36  
Old 13 September 2011, 22:25
stragedy stragedy is offline
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RIP Kips Pr0n.

The only other thing I can think of is to change out the controller board, its worked for me. Find an identical drive and (you'll need a torx wrench set) stick the good contoller board on your dead drive.
If it doesnt work, you still have a new drive.
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  #37  
Old 14 September 2011, 10:33
Magyc Magyc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B 2/75 View Post
but with two drives you have the option of setting them up as a RAID 0, meaning the drives are clones of each other, updated continuously. Should one die, simply pull it out and slam in a new one (same make / capacity) and it can automatically update itself.
I'm sure you just had a typo/brain fart, but to clarify for Kip and others that may use this (I do for my data)

RAID 0 is striped (performance)

RAID 1 is mirror (redundancy)
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  #38  
Old 14 September 2011, 11:02
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This is a no-shitter.

I used to do data recovery.

On certain drives (mostly old ones), when nothing else worked, I would sharply tap the drive on a front corner or a rear corner with a small rubber mallet right as I applied power. This was often enough to jar the head assembly back into battery, and it enabled stuck disks to spin up.

When you pull the lid on the drive and observe it as you apply power, you probably see the head actuator assembly ("the arm") tracking back and forth but not successfully traversing across the entire face of the disk surface. This is probably the source of the clicking sound that you hear. It probably tries, then snaps back, clicking with each attempt.

Are the disks actually spinning? If they are, but the head actuator cannot traverse all the way to the periphery of the disk to acquire the boot sectors, you are probably out of luck. Unless you can use a jeweler's loop or some other form of magnification to determine what is mechanically preventing the head actuators from moving.

On the other hand....if the head actuator assembly can traverse to the periphery of the disk, you may be able to do software data recovery, but the odds are low. You may or may not see actual grooves in the top disk where the heads crashed into the media. You will not be able to see whether this happened to the other disks sandwiched beneath the top disk.

If you have head crashes...you are done. In some cases, professional joints like DriveSavers can help. But they generally take a dim view of amateurs like us trying our own drive resuscitation efforts before sending the drive to them. They will usually reject the drive before even attempting a recovery.

I always considered tapping a drive on boot up a final measure. It worked more often than you might think, and when it did, people thought that I was a genius. I am not. I just gave the drive a little smack. Sometimes it worked.

Especially when you have already replaced the controller board. Generally, in these cases, you will be dealing with a mechanical issue with the disks and the head actuator assembly.

Clear as mud?

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  #39  
Old 14 September 2011, 12:29
Mortalitus Mortalitus is offline
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As far as backup goes other than what has been stated by other members. Redundancy is a good way to go but layered technology is something I highly recommend and strictly enforce among my personal business Matters and Clients.
All backup data is stored via Solid State dives, and Commercially produced Blu-ray Disks. Vs - HDDs and Dual layer commercially purchached (store bought) DVD or Blu-ray.

Solid State is a much more stable platorm and has no mechanical parts to wear out or break down. Which is why alot of PC manufacturers are moving to them in builds exclusively. As wel as boasting tremendous data retrieval speeds over the platter based magnetic disk HDD's.

As far as disks go Store bought disks be it Blue-ray or DVD or CD, because they are burnable or RW/ have only a top layer of hard plastic for protection as well as you are "writing" essntially to a piece of tin foil that is essentially a sticker. This is done by the laser blacking out little lines in the "foil" so it creates bits of data for interpretation of the reader. However the bottom of the disk does not have the same hvy layer of plastic protection as the top of the disk does. So scratching of the disck and smudging is a problem, as well as becuase the "foil is not the same type or thickness used in Commercially produces disks it degrades over time in areas where you wrote creating a shelf life. Commercially produced disks have actual lines written into the metal to make the data permanent and readable with a thicker protective coating on the bottom and top.

Blu-ray disks on the other hand have an additional anti- scratch coating on the bottom that makes them extremely resistant to scratches and smudges and can hold a staggering amount of data. There are a number of secure data Co's out there that can run backup's for you to commerical disks.

Use technology to your advantage. You can still use HDD's and the others I've seen some still roll magnetic tape backups. becuase frankly it's hard to fuck those those up. But the volumes get huge unless you have a great team of people and space for that shit. Better to use solid state for that and stick them in a safe in the AC safety of your server room if you have one. If your just running from home. Plopping them in the gun safe where it's dry and semi-moisture controlled is fine. Or just get a moisture controlled safe that's shielded. from power discharge and slide the hdd's into those anti-static bags before depositing.

Last edited by Mortalitus; 14 September 2011 at 12:31.
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  #40  
Old 12 September 2017, 13:59
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B 2/75 B 2/75 is offline
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NecroPosting...


Had yet another external drive crash. This time I've been running a NAS in a D-Link 2-bay enclosure set up RAID 1, with two full-size 1TB drives cloning eachother. It's been a good and faithful servant for about four years, even if the enclosure is a tad loud... I've kept it inside the TV cabinet where it's fan noise was deadened.

Yesterday, I got on it and found that WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON HERE... there were two partitions, volume 1 and volume 2. Now there's just volume 1. I don't know when it failed to mount; it could have potentially been some time, as that's a drive we don't use much (backup to a backup of some certain data... that's why it's a small partition)

The remaining partition still occupies the same amount of disk space, 3/4 of the drive. The blank spot on the drive isn't recognized by Windoze Explorer anymore. There have been essentially zero read / write excursions on the drive since the partition disappeared (It's actually been sitting in my storage room for about a year)

My plan it to pull one drive for safekeeping, and try to recover the other drive. I've got a working externally-powered Buffalo one bay enclosure that connects via USB. I'll plan on starting recovery with that.

Any observations, folks? The drives are functioning correctly, just that a partition is gone.
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Last edited by B 2/75; 12 September 2017 at 14:05.
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