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  #41  
Old 15 October 2011, 18:00
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Originally Posted by bm2bob View Post
There is no way to tell who will get PTSD and who will not beforehand. Psych screening would not help.

There are imndicators, but to follow them would be to eliminate a large number of people who would volunteer for the military, without any assurance that they would get PTSD if they were exposed anyway.
What's interesting is somebody who is able to handle a great deal of stress consistently and perform in such a way that you'd think he/she is never susceptible suddenly winds up breaking down.

Finkel's book Soldier detailed just such a case, a respected NCO throughout his company, bn and indeed the whole bde wound up not being able to deal with things, after having been a rock over several tours.

There's a breaking point for everybody, but there is really no diagnostic tool that will pinpoint it.
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  #42  
Old 24 October 2011, 16:16
LokiWolf LokiWolf is offline
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Can someone still have PTSD 30 years later? How do you get them to get treatment if they're the type that "can deal with anything" and just thinks they have some "quirks" ?
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  #43  
Old 24 October 2011, 16:44
logan3110 logan3110 is offline
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Can someone still have PTSD 30 years later? How do you get them to get treatment if they're the type that "can deal with anything" and just thinks they have some "quirks" ?
Yes- Nowadays, they have PTS syndrome, or something, because almost everyone returning from 7/12/18 months overseas has some sort of issues. But PTSD, yes, if left untreated (even if treated), could certainly stay for 30 years.

Question: Your husband can "deal with anything", and has some "quirks"? If this is true, I don't see why he would need to get help. However, if it's worse than that, he needs to see why he's hurting those around him. He will never willingly undergo treatment if he doesn't think he has a problem.

Invite him onto this board. He may meet some old friends. In my experience, being around like minded people is some of the best therapy out there.
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  #44  
Old 24 October 2011, 16:55
LokiWolf LokiWolf is offline
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Originally Posted by logan3110 View Post
Yes- Nowadays, they have PTS syndrome, or something, because almost everyone returning from 7/12/18 months overseas has some sort of issues. But PTSD, yes, if left untreated (even if treated), could certainly stay for 30 years.

Question: Your husband can "deal with anything", and has some "quirks"? If this is true, I don't see why he would need to get help. However, if it's worse than that, he needs to see why he's hurting those around him. He will never willingly undergo treatment if he doesn't think he has a problem.

Invite him onto this board. He may meet some old friends. In my experience, being around like minded people is some of the best therapy out there.
Well, quirks like, don't try to wake him up from a nightmare, don't EVER come up behind him without him knowing it, and bad reactions to some movies, or to noises that sound like gunfire.
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  #45  
Old 24 October 2011, 16:57
LokiWolf LokiWolf is offline
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Err, sorry I guess it would be 40 years now. Was about 30 years when I met him.
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  #46  
Old 24 October 2011, 17:18
logan3110 logan3110 is offline
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If he doesn't have issues that affect his day to day life (substance abuse, anger managment), than he will most likely fail to see why he needs help. And I can't really say that I blame him. After all, most of what you described is also a survival instict. If this is the worst of what you've seen, you should just love our old warrior and take the good with the bad.
Again, if he needs help, he has to see where he has hurt others around him. This is probably your first step.
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  #47  
Old 24 October 2011, 23:14
LokiWolf LokiWolf is offline
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Well, it's a bit more in depth than that, but those are the things that it's easy for others to see.
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  #48  
Old 25 October 2011, 12:18
HOLLiS HOLLiS is offline
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Originally Posted by LokiWolf View Post
Can someone still have PTSD 30 years later? How do you get them to get treatment if they're the type that "can deal with anything" and just thinks they have some "quirks" ?
Yes and a lot longer. There is a time limit to where it needs to be treated where it does not pattern itself in the brain. After that it is permanent. Then one can only treat and learn to live the symptoms.

For family members there are books and pamphlets about living with a person with PTSD. One book, [I]Recovering from the War[I] by Patience Mason. Her husband wrote [I]Chicken Hawk[I].

PTSD come in various degrees and does not make a person a psychopath as often the media portrays them. Many Vets have productive lives learning to live the problem.

People can bury the problem in their minds for a long time. Even WWII vets, can still seek treatment for it.
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  #49  
Old 25 October 2011, 14:09
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reed11b reed11b is offline
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[QUOTE=HOLLiS;1058050054]Yes and a lot longer. There is a time limit to where it needs to be treated where it does not pattern itself in the brain. After that it is permanent. Then one can only treat and learn to live the symptoms.

QUOTE]

This is not true. We have had success treating PTSD in Vietnam Vets at the Vet Center. It IS harder, the longer you wait however.
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  #50  
Old 29 October 2011, 21:05
LokiWolf LokiWolf is offline
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Originally Posted by logan3110 View Post
If he doesn't have issues that affect his day to day life (substance abuse, anger managment), than he will most likely fail to see why he needs help. And I can't really say that I blame him. After all, most of what you described is also a survival instict. If this is the worst of what you've seen, you should just love our old warrior and take the good with the bad.
Again, if he needs help, he has to see where he has hurt others around him. This is probably your first step.
No, no anger management issues or affecting day-to-day life stuff or anything like that. I just feel a bit helpless regarding things like the nightmares and stuff, because I DO love him to pieces, and I hate to see HIM hurting and not be able to help.
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  #51  
Old 29 October 2011, 21:46
HOLLiS HOLLiS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOLLiS View Post
Yes and a lot longer. There is a time limit to where it needs to be treated where it does not pattern itself in the brain. After that it is permanent. Then one can only treat and learn to live the symptoms.
This is not true. We have had success treating PTSD in Vietnam Vets at the Vet Center. It IS harder, the longer you wait however.
Reed
Then I guess that means there is no such thing as a permanent disability rating for PTSD.

Quote:
PTSD can be either acute or chronic; the acute phase occurring directly after the trauma, while the chronic phase can come along much later. In the acute phase, PTSD is said to be treatable and curable. In its chronic phase, it is only treatable. One must learn to live with it and to cope with it.
http://www.mnwelldir.org/docs/mental_health/ptsd.htm <--- also a good read.

Last edited by HOLLiS; 29 October 2011 at 21:51.
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