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View Poll Results: What % of Friends/Family are Fully Prepared for Global Disaster (3-18 Month Survival)
Less than 1% 83 44.86%
1-10% 64 34.59%
10-20% 19 10.27%
20-30% 10 5.41%
Greater than 30% 9 4.86%
Voters: 185. You may not vote on this poll

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  #881  
Old 27 June 2018, 09:32
wowzers wowzers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fat Guy View Post
I think buying one and learning to shoot it would be first. The other thing is having access to the correct materials. Look around, I think there is a thread on making bows, I will see if I can revive it.
Clay makes some nice bows and has some pretty good videos for beginners. I'm about to pick up two osage staves from him. https://www.twistedstave.com/traditional-archery2/
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  #882  
Old 27 June 2018, 10:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fat Guy View Post
I think buying one and learning to shoot it would be first. The other thing is having access to the correct materials. Look around, I think there is a thread on making bows, I will see if I can revive it.
Here's one:
http://socnet.com/showthread.php?t=129194

There may be others.
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  #883  
Old 3 July 2018, 00:42
wowzers wowzers is offline
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The start to hopefully never having a power bill again.
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  #884  
Old 3 July 2018, 01:23
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My daughter really had more an interest in how to make one. I tend to focus on what you would need to survive immediately for 3 days to 3 mos in a major disaster

My daughter tends to focus on longer goals, which is good. I copied this link to her and she asked how you would know which tree to use.

We are not able to identify the name of one tree to the next, so is there a simple rule of thumb? My response is that I would just start with trial and error with trees around me.

Right now, we are just chattering and TFG is correct. We need to buy something and learn to use it first and that can't happened for a few months yet.

I refuse to let her come here and ask what is the best wood to use.
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  #885  
Old 3 July 2018, 21:30
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Here's a bow that I had as a teenager-

the Bear '76er' take down bow

Magnesium riser and fiberglass limbs-damned near indestructible

Mine was stolen

55lb draw and I used 28" arrows

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Fre...-/283036585598

Great 'starter' bow with out being heavily invested
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  #886  
Old 3 July 2018, 23:05
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOFH View Post
Here's one:
http://socnet.com/showthread.php?t=129194

There may be others.
I think I was the one that revived it.
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  #887  
Old 17 September 2018, 09:25
Gsniper Gsniper is online now
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Getting ready to switch over from short term to mid term power. I have 6 of the 100lb bottles and if I go thru them I have the stuff on hand to hook into the 500gal tank that heats the house.
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  #888  
Old 17 September 2018, 11:58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhea View Post
My daughter tends to focus on longer goals, which is good. I copied this link to her and she asked how you would know which tree to use.

We are not able to identify the name of one tree to the next, so is there a simple rule of thumb? My response is that I would just start with trial and error with trees around me.
Trial and error is how it was all figured out in the first place. It's a very long process of trial and error, though. Cut a tree, let it season for a year, then find out it doesn't work. :-(

I'd start by identifying which trees in your area make good bow wood, then at least learning to identify those trees.

That said, at the end of the day, anything that shoots an arrow is "good enough," for a survival situation. I can make one out of loblolly pine that is good enough to get some food with, in the short term...and that's one of the worst bow woods imaginable.

I've also made a couple of very good bows out of pretty bad wood. Made one out of tulip poplar just to see how it would work. I backed it with deer leg sinew, and it had no problem driving an arrow about 2" into an oak log at 30' or so. Black locust is good; hickory is not great, but easy to work with, and it's more than good enough for hunting.

Elm (any kind of elm) is great...In my opinion, it's the very best of the whitewoods (though harder to work with than hickory). My 5' smooth-leafed elm bow pulled about 65lbs at 28", and I have no doubt I could have taken even big north American game with it.

For you, in Texas...it largely depends on what part of the state. Osage is probably the best bow wood on the planet, and plentiful in parts of Texas. Texas mulberry is a great bow wood, though you'll probably have trouble finding a big enough tree to get a bow from. Sycamore can make a beautiful bow, but you have to really know what you're doing.
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  #889  
Old 17 September 2018, 18:44
Stretch Stretch is offline
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I have a gasoline to propane/natural gas converter on the way.

Natural gas and city water are normally readily available.

I have some work ahead and get that generator connected to NG.
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  #890  
Old 17 September 2018, 18:56
Gsniper Gsniper is online now
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I'll never have another gasoline only generator. Propane/Nat gas is the way to go. You can just store the bottles for years if necessary.
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  #891  
Old 17 September 2018, 20:13
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Mingo Kane Mingo Kane is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhea View Post
I refuse to let her come here and ask what is the best wood to use.
Yes...it would be an odd question to ask a bunch of knuckle draggers. But I agree with what was stated earlier...Osage Orange is GTG. Think monkey ball or hedge apple trees...
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  #892  
Old 21 September 2018, 11:31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wowzers View Post
Clay makes some nice bows and has some pretty good videos for beginners. I'm about to pick up two osage staves from him. https://www.twistedstave.com/traditional-archery2/
I did a recent Mind4Survival podcast episode on traditional archery with Scott Moore.

Traditional archery seems pretty interesting.
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  #893  
Old 21 September 2018, 17:08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOFH View Post
Trial and error is how it was all figured out in the first place. It's a very long process of trial and error, though. Cut a tree, let it season for a year, then find out it doesn't work. :-(

I'd start by identifying which trees in your area make good bow wood, then at least learning to identify those trees.

That said, at the end of the day, anything that shoots an arrow is "good enough," for a survival situation. I can make one out of loblolly pine that is good enough to get some food with, in the short term...and that's one of the worst bow woods imaginable.

I've also made a couple of very good bows out of pretty bad wood. Made one out of tulip poplar just to see how it would work. I backed it with deer leg sinew, and it had no problem driving an arrow about 2" into an oak log at 30' or so. Black locust is good; hickory is not great, but easy to work with, and it's more than good enough for hunting.

Elm (any kind of elm) is great...In my opinion, it's the very best of the whitewoods (though harder to work with than hickory). My 5' smooth-leafed elm bow pulled about 65lbs at 28", and I have no doubt I could have taken even big north American game with it.

For you, in Texas...it largely depends on what part of the state. Osage is probably the best bow wood on the planet, and plentiful in parts of Texas. Texas mulberry is a great bow wood, though you'll probably have trouble finding a big enough tree to get a bow from. Sycamore can make a beautiful bow, but you have to really know what you're doing.
Thanks BOFH - I saw this a couple of weeks ago but was overcome by events. This is a great answer. Especially the part about a bad bow will still take down game in the short run. Learn to work with what is available.

We need to learn to identify these trees first. That seems like the best place to start.
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  #894  
Old 21 September 2018, 23:20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhea View Post
Thanks BOFH - I saw this a couple of weeks ago but was overcome by events. This is a great answer. Especially the part about a bad bow will still take down game in the short run. Learn to work with what is available.

We need to learn to identify these trees first. That seems like the best place to start.
VA Tech has an Android app (I'm sure there's one for iPhone, as well) that is useful for tree identification. I don't know where my phone is right now, but whenever I find it, I'll post the name of the app.
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  #895  
Old 22 September 2018, 10:35
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So my listening to mind4survival got me thinking so I have been working on water catchment. So far, I have a 100 gallon system on the front of a small shed for HH6 to fill her watering cans for the garden. It filled quickly and has stayed full with all of the rain. I am also building a pressurized system that will have 9 x 275 chem totes in it, all connected by PVC. Just using the 100 gallon system, we cut the water bill in half. I also had to reroute the outdoor spigot water around the water filter in the house. The final effort will be a water catchment system off of a larger storage building that feeds directly into the cistern used to water the horses and farm hydrants. I am going to plumb this cistern to feed the house for two reasons, one to add city water to the cistern (better than the bathtub) and 2, to be able to pull water from the cistern, run it through the whole house water filter and softener and reverse osmosis system and use it in the house. Pix when I get them all done.
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  #896  
Old 22 September 2018, 11:20
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^^
I remember your cistern project from before.
Am curious to see your system of front-end/roof collection, esp what you've used for initial straining/filtering of gross material into the first hold. I'm planning in my head for similar roof-collection/storage/gravity-feed for camp use vs digging a well or looking for land with stream access.

I think maybe B2/75 (?) also had a linked poly tank setup on here somewhere?

DaveP
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  #897  
Old 22 September 2018, 22:42
wowzers wowzers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OfficeSloth View Post
I did a recent Mind4Survival podcast episode on traditional archery with Scott Moore.

Traditional archery seems pretty interesting.
I'll have to give it a listen. I seem to go in spurts with podcasts and yours is great to get a bunch downloaded and listen to them back to back on some of my long drives. Gives a guy things to see think about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fat Guy View Post
So my listening to mind4survival got me thinking so I have been working on water catchment. So far, I have a 100 gallon system on the front of a small shed for HH6 to fill her watering cans for the garden. It filled quickly and has stayed full with all of the rain. I am also building a pressurized system that will have 9 x 275 chem totes in it, all connected by PVC. Just using the 100 gallon system, we cut the water bill in half. I also had to reroute the outdoor spigot water around the water filter in the house. The final effort will be a water catchment system off of a larger storage building that feeds directly into the cistern used to water the horses and farm hydrants. I am going to plumb this cistern to feed the house for two reasons, one to add city water to the cistern (better than the bathtub) and 2, to be able to pull water from the cistern, run it through the whole house water filter and softener and reverse osmosis system and use it in the house. Pix when I get them all done.

I'll have to take some pictures of mine. It was installed by the previous owners and our only water source at the moment till I save enough to drill a well. It's a 2500 gallon tank buried half way in the ground that gravity feeds to the house. I'm currently rebuilding the gutter system and installing a UV filter and a sediment and charcoal filter in the house for when it gets hooked back up. It's pretty amazing the pressure I get from just the gravity. I'll probably end up hooking up a small 12v pump though so I can have constant pressure for the on demand hot water heater.

Currently building the Taj Mahal of chicken coops for the Wife's birds and plan on having dual 55 gallon drums on each side. Goats and pigs house too.
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  #898  
Old 23 September 2018, 08:20
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Its amazing how much water you catch. I plan to install a solar generator in my shop next and run the pump via solar. My filtering is simple, I use nylon mesh at the mouth of the tank. I just use it for the garden right now and eventually the horses. I have a system in the house to run it through if I ever get that far. I also need to paint the white poly tanks black to help fight the algae. They sit in the sun with zero shade.
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  #899  
Old 23 September 2018, 08:26
wowzers wowzers is offline
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Mine is black and additionally I'm hoping it helps with keeping it warmer in the winter. Those first flush diverters are nice for keeping the extras out of your clean tank.
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  #900  
Old 23 September 2018, 20:10
8654maine 8654maine is online now
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Originally Posted by The Fat Guy View Post
Its amazing how much water you catch. I plan to install a solar generator in my shop next and run the pump via solar. My filtering is simple, I use nylon mesh at the mouth of the tank. I just use it for the garden right now and eventually the horses. I have a system in the house to run it through if I ever get that far. I also need to paint the white poly tanks black to help fight the algae. They sit in the sun with zero shade.
That sounds great. What type of solar set up?
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