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Old 17 October 2017, 15:13
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Triple Canopy, Inc. settles FCA case

This came out yesterday.

https://www.justice.gov/usao-edva/pr...laims-act-suit

DOJ announced settling a False Claim Act ("FCA") case against Triple Canopy. The overall allegation was that Triple Canopy was providing unqualified security guards in Iraq from 2009-2010. Specifically, the complaint stated that of 300 Ugandan guards, none were able to pass the firearms proficiency exam and the company falsified the results to show a passing score. The relator (whistleblower), allegedly is a former US Army medic with the Ranger Regiment. He will get $500k from the $2.6M settlement. Of course after attorneys fees and taxes, he'll likely end up with somewhere around $200k. Triple Canopy denies wrongdoing.
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Old 18 October 2017, 08:28
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The Ugandans couldn't shoot either?? For $400 a month that's what you get.
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Old 21 October 2017, 00:48
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Originally Posted by CAVmedic View Post
The Ugandans couldn't shoot either?? For $400 a month that's what you get.
When I left TC in 2016 they were getting 33 a day, same with the Peruvians.

Rock
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Old 21 October 2017, 08:55
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I was in Iraq 2008-2009. The armed Ugandans I worked with did their jobs well. I had no complaints.
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Old 21 October 2017, 10:46
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Below is a little bit of insight I'll share because quite few folks on here are involved in contracting with the government. These comments are on the civil aspect of false claims and not the criminal.

I'm not familiar with the evidentiary details of this case, but I can assure you that if the government pursues a FCA case then they have the evidence necessary to win. In fact, very few FCA cases ever proceed to trial and there are multiple reasons: 1) the cases are essentially a win for the government because it's been thoroughly investigated by both relators counsel and the government, often involving years of investigation, 2) the damages are trebled, thus a verdict at trial can and is a question of financial survival, and 3) fear of exclusion from future government contracts, which amounts to the death penalty for most corporations.

Our firm declines to represent over 95% of potential relators for lack of sufficient evidence because ultimately we have to overcome the heightened 9(b) standard and the inevitable Motion to Dismiss. Once we do our due diligence investigation and even before we file the case under seal, we're required by law to meet with the government and to provide our evidence. The government has three options: 1) agree to intervene at that meeting, which is extraordinarily rare because they want to investigate first before making a decision, 2) decline to intervene at the meeting, which does happen for a variety of reasons, or 3) decide to postpone a decision so they can initiate their own investigation, which happens the most.

These cases remain under seal for a long time, often 5-6 years, while the government investigates. In fact, when we go to our first relators meeting its quite common to meet with multiple alphabet agencies due to the type of case and the corresponding and often overlapping jurisdictional authorities (i.e. FBI, HHS, DOD, SEC, IRS, USPS...etc). These agencies conduct extensive joint investigations often using CIDs and subpoenas. The targeted company (a.k.a. defendant) soon knows they're in the crosshairs and they typically do everything they can do to settle ASAP.

Finally, technically a settled case means there was no finding at trial, thus the company is free to deny wrongdoing, as they did in the above case. Furthermore, although they're subject to a CIA, it's far better than paying 7-10 digit monetary penalties and fees or being excluded from future government contracts which is a potential outcome at trial and thus a death sentence for a company like Triple Canopy.
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Old 21 October 2017, 19:20
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When I left TC in 2016 they were getting 33 a day, same with the Peruvians.

Rock
The Ugandans employed by SOC in 2011-12' were good at searching a vehicle and that's about all. I don't know how they recruited them but they told is Ugandans were paid $4-600 a month.

IIRC didn't TC go through a lawsuit with Columbians recruited for X amount a month and the pay ended up being about half that in the 2010-2012 timeframe?
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Old 30 October 2017, 17:27
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The Ugandans couldn't shoot either?? For $400 a month that's what you get.
There are about a dozen Ugandans that worked at VBC that could easily prove that incorrect.
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Old 30 October 2017, 18:23
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The Ugandans couldn't shoot either?? For $400 a month that's what you get.
$400 a month for you would be a paltry wage...

Considering the monthly wages for a Ugandan SNCO is a little less than $130 a month (this is after they got a big pay raise in 2013.. it was less prior to that).. and the monthly wages for a Ugandan cop is roughly $160... and that the overall average monthly wage for "skilled labor" in Uganda is about $170..

Then factor in high unemployment and the fact that getting one of those jobs that pays between $130-$170 a month is extremely difficult...

Suddenly $400 a month looks mighty damn attractive..


At $400 a month you have the ability to recruit the best the country has to offer...

Whether or not "the best" is good enough, is a completely different debate..

But the old "pay peanuts, get monkeys" argument is tired and completely invalid..



I sadly had just as many (possibly more) incompetent US citizens work for me in Iraq as I did Ugandans from a percentage perspective.. and fired far more of them for inability to perform, laziness, and general assclownery than I care to count (again based on a percentage basis of total # or personnel hired/employed)..

Thankfully MOST people (whether Ugandan or US Citizens) were somewhere between reasonably decent to exceptionally good..




In 2010 pay was $500 a month for Ugandans... X% absolutely sucked and had to get sent home..

In 2010 pay was roughly $6K a month for US cops and military experienced guys to supervise the $400 Ugandans (static security)... roughly the same % of Americans absolutely sucked as Ugandans and had to get sent home..


In 2007 We were paying $1500 a month for Ugandans with the same qualifications as the ones we paid $500 for in 2010... and we were paying $12K a month for the same US guys we were paying $6K for in 2010 (static security personnel)...

Wanna know what didnt change between 2007-2010 when wages were taking a major nose dive every 6-12 months?

The % of assclowns that couldnt/wouldnt do their job (regardless of the wage) that we ended up sending home..

Wages dropped exponentially year over year.. but the % of good vs bad employees across all nationalities (doesnt matter if we're talking US, UK, Eastern European, Fijians, Filipinos, or Ugandans..).. pretty much stayed constant the entire time..
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Old 30 October 2017, 18:42
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That was a long explanation. Let me Infantry it.

At least 50% of humanity is fucked up no matter how much you pay them.
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Old 30 October 2017, 19:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdwest View Post
$400 a month for you would be a paltry wage...

Considering the monthly wages for a Ugandan SNCO is a little less than $130 a month (this is after they got a big pay raise in 2013.. it was less prior to that).. and the monthly wages for a Ugandan cop is roughly $160... and that the overall average monthly wage for "skilled labor" in Uganda is about $170..

Then factor in high unemployment and the fact that getting one of those jobs that pays between $130-$170 a month is extremely difficult...

Suddenly $400 a month looks mighty damn attractive..


At $400 a month you have the ability to recruit the best the country has to offer...

Whether or not "the best" is good enough, is a completely different debate..

But the old "pay peanuts, get monkeys" argument is tired and completely invalid..



I sadly had just as many (possibly more) incompetent US citizens work for me in Iraq as I did Ugandans from a percentage perspective.. and fired far more of them for inability to perform, laziness, and general assclownery than I care to count (again based on a percentage basis of total # or personnel hired/employed)..

Thankfully MOST people (whether Ugandan or US Citizens) were somewhere between reasonably decent to exceptionally good..




In 2010 pay was $500 a month for Ugandans... X% absolutely sucked and had to get sent home..

In 2010 pay was roughly $6K a month for US cops and military experienced guys to supervise the $400 Ugandans (static security)... roughly the same % of Americans absolutely sucked as Ugandans and had to get sent home..


In 2007 We were paying $1500 a month for Ugandans with the same qualifications as the ones we paid $500 for in 2010... and we were paying $12K a month for the same US guys we were paying $6K for in 2010 (static security personnel)...

Wanna know what didnt change between 2007-2010 when wages were taking a major nose dive every 6-12 months?

The % of assclowns that couldnt/wouldnt do their job (regardless of the wage) that we ended up sending home..

Wages dropped exponentially year over year.. but the % of good vs bad employees across all nationalities (doesnt matter if we're talking US, UK, Eastern European, Fijians, Filipinos, or Ugandans..).. pretty much stayed constant the entire time..
That's the best explanation of wages to competence I've seen in years.
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Old 31 October 2017, 09:55
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That was a long explanation. Let me Infantry it.

At least 50% of humanity is fucked up no matter how much you pay them.
Your optimism continually impresses me.
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Old 31 October 2017, 10:11
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Your optimism continually impresses me.
Waaaaaay too optimistic.
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Old 31 October 2017, 20:13
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I agree with the above stud to shitbag ratios, but getting soldiers and police from any other country to fill security positions that directly affect national security, it seems like there's got to be some better quality out there somewhere than Uganda. If they make less than $130 at home imagine the quality of training they must have? I mean are bullets 10x cheaper there too? If so, do they actually get to train? Most of the ones I met were really polite and seemed intelligent but I don't know what would happen during a complex attack.

I guess whoever decided to use them never had to worry because insurgents never took over the IZ or VBC.
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Old 1 November 2017, 10:07
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The same could be said for most Europeans... Most European armies dont have the budgets or the resources to conduct the same level of training as US forces..

Ever see a group of brits from the TA on the range? A significant number of them have serious challenges shooting to the same standard US NG troops do.. Doesnt make them bad troops at all.. its just a result of having less time and money available for training..



The US government is who decided to use Ugandans (without actually stating "Ugandans"... )

The US government wanted a low cost solution to FOB security.. They didnt want to use US military personnel (long term legacy costs and greater priority elsewhere for US soldiers/sailors/airmen/Marines).. and they didnt want to pay the high short term cost of US Citizen contractors..

The solution that contracting firms came up with was to seek out internationals from English speaking countries that met the US governments minimum requirements and came within the cost target range established by the customer..

Canadians/Aussies/Brits/etc.. all still way too expensive.. the USG wasnt going to pay the price...

Finding enough Filipinos, Nepalese, Peruvians, etc.. that were fluent English speakers wasnt an option.. VBC alone had more than 2500 static security positions at one time.. Iraq wide there was a requirement for almost 15,000 at one point..

So whats that leave you? What other country(s) speak English and can provide that number of bodies?

The solution that the contract firms figured out was to look to former British colonies.. Kenya, Uganda, India, etc.. where there were a significant number of English speakers available, that have sizable military and police forces to recruit from, that could provide personnel at the price point the US Government was willing to pay..

Weighing the options of Kenyans vs Ugandans.. the Ugandans won (although some companies did try Kenyans at one point as well as guys from Sierra Leone.. neither worked out nearly as well as the Ugandans.. We looked hard at Tanzanians once, but realized the English requirement was going to be a bridge too far, etc..etc..).

The Government establishes the requirements.

The contract firms simply respond to the requirements and try to find solutions to whatever the customer is asking for..

If the USG had been willing to pay for 2,500 former US Army combat arms qualified E5's to work ECPs and towers at VBC.. thats what they would have gotten..
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Last edited by mdwest; 1 November 2017 at 10:20.
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Old 1 November 2017, 11:23
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Th Ugandans meet the requirements set forth by the client (DoS) and a large percentage are actually better shooters and much more physically fit then US LEOs.
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Old 1 November 2017, 14:16
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Ultimately, this case was not whether the Ugandans were good shots, it's whether the government had sufficient proof to meet their burden that Triple Canopy submitted false claims, or to be fair, whether the company made the decision to settle rather than litigate in order to avoid additional litigation expenses? That can mean any number of things, which I will not speculate on, except to say as I did earlier, that in my experience the government typically doesn't intervene in FCA cases unless the evidence is there.
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