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Old 10 April 2017, 22:07
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Woodworking

I hope this fly's here.

I have decided to take up some woodworking. I am thinking about making some nice cutting boards in my off time.

What equipment is needed? I do not want to invest a ton of money maybe 500. I have cordless drills, chop saw, circular saw. I can see need for a router, bar clamps, orbital sander, belt sander and what else in the way of tools? I have a 8 foot bench with cabinets underneath. Roll around with hand tools. I have an all metal vice, do I need a wood vice, if that is what it is called?

In this group we have got to have some woodworkers.

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 11 April 2017, 03:37
Gsniper Gsniper is offline
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Tabletop planer.
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Old 11 April 2017, 07:02
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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I just started woodworking as well.

Made some cutting boards. End grain.

Table saw, jointer, planer, and sander is about it. Lots of clamps and good glue. I also inherited some old chisels and hand planers as well that came in handy.

Make sure all cuts are the right angle. I used several carpenter's angles and protractors to make sure my angles were either 90 or 45 deg (fancy shit).

I built my own sled for cross cuts to get reliable, repeatable cuts.

One thing with end-grain cutting boards is to go with small increments on the planers. Otherwise, they can kick. I lost one board to this.

Good luck. Woodworking has helped my sanity.
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Old 11 April 2017, 07:20
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With a starting budget of 500, stuff like a planer are out of the question.

Quote:
I have cordless drills, chop saw, circular saw. I can see need for a router, bar clamps, orbital sander, belt sander and what else in the way of tools?
If you're sticking to cutting boards and the like, then a bit of good news is that you're not going to have to spend much. The items you mentioned above are all going to be necessary. Don't forget to get a round-over / quarter round bit for the router. Harbor Freight will be your buddy for clamps and such.

Spend time experimenting with alternating wood colors, patterns, and grain. If the bug flourishes, then look into getting a table top planer, table saw, and a jointer.

Have fun, and keep our fingers outta the way...
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Old 11 April 2017, 12:54
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Kreg jig. I'm pretty useless without it now and rely on it too much.
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Old 11 April 2017, 14:23
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Pawn shops and estate sales/auctions are a great place to look for tools. Keep an eye out on craigslist/classifieds also.
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Old 11 April 2017, 15:01
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Excellent, thanks all.

I have looked at some plans and have seen some that seem to be made of square blocks of different types of wood. Those look the best to me.

But, methinks I should start by making small once piece cutting boards and get my router and sanding skills down.

I did work in my uncles custom cabinet shop years ago and know the most about final finish, not running a belt sander across the grain etc.

I know the least about the initial cutting and getting the rough shape down. Measure twice, cut once makes sense to me.

What wood has nice contrasting colors but will stand up to daily kitchen knife work?

ETA: I looked at a smaller table saw, and bench planer. More than a few can be had new at Home Depot. But yeah, Forestboy is right about checking out pawnshops and craigslist.

Thanks.
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Old 11 April 2017, 15:36
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I have this for use with the table saw. It can be used with the router as well.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/m...em-model-gr200
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Last edited by 34RX; 11 April 2017 at 15:37. Reason: Grammar
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Old 11 April 2017, 15:39
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Maple and Walnut

White oak and Purple Heart

Good to start with. Keep it simple at first, laying up alternating long strips of wood, glue it up, bent sand smooth with the grain, round over the edges, and finish with a food grade butcher's block oil.
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  #10  
Old 11 April 2017, 20:06
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 34RX View Post
Kreg jig. I'm pretty useless without it now and rely on it too much.
Disagree with Kreg jig; it would make only one side usable. I prefer doweling, gluing and clamping to join edge on.

Harbor Freight is indeed your friend for wood working clamps.

If you really get the bug, invest in an inexpensive router table that you can put your router onto. A lot easier to use and easier to control the piece...
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Old 11 April 2017, 20:09
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Originally Posted by Expatmedic View Post
Excellent, thanks all.

I have looked at some plans and have seen some that seem to be made of square blocks of different types of wood. Those look the best to me.

But, methinks I should start by making small once piece cutting boards and get my router and sanding skills down.

I did work in my uncles custom cabinet shop years ago and know the most about final finish, not running a belt sander across the grain etc.

I know the least about the initial cutting and getting the rough shape down. Measure twice, cut once makes sense to me.

What wood has nice contrasting colors but will stand up to daily kitchen knife work?

ETA: I looked at a smaller table saw, and bench planer. More than a few can be had new at Home Depot. But yeah, Forestboy is right about checking out pawnshops and craigslist.

Thanks.
Look at plans on www.ana-white.com; easy stuff to start with-

http://www.ana-white.com/search/node/cutting%20board
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Old 11 April 2017, 20:35
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I've built about a dozen Ana White projects. Great recommendation, RGR.Montcalm. Much like 8654maine, woodworking helps with my sanity.

You can never have too many good clamps. If you are making the same type of cuts repeatedly, jigs are your best friend. You can make a lot of them yourself with YouTube instruction, but there are many for sale, as well.
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Old 11 April 2017, 20:52
34RX 34RX is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
Disagree with Kreg jig; it would make only one side usable. I prefer doweling, gluing and clamping to join edge on.
I agree with you in regards to his specific project. I meant to suggest the jig as a good general woodworking tool. The best options don't use any hardware but aren't what I'd start with as a beginner on a budget.
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Old 11 April 2017, 21:08
Stretch Stretch is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expatmedic View Post
I hope this fly's here.

I have decided to take up some woodworking. I am thinking about making some nice cutting boards in my off time.

What equipment is needed? I do not want to invest a ton of money maybe 500. I have cordless drills, chop saw, circular saw. I can see need for a router, bar clamps, orbital sander, belt sander and what else in the way of tools? I have a 8 foot bench with cabinets underneath. Roll around with hand tools. I have an all metal vice, do I need a wood vice, if that is what it is called?

In this group we have got to have some woodworkers.

Thanks.
You should be good to go with what you have, adding clamps and such.

Next buy should be a "homeowner" table saw if you want to rip planks for chopping blocks, regardless of end grain or otherwise. Good saw blades and slow and easy will save fingers. I still have all of mine. I know men missing digits, careless or too fast was always the issue.

Have fun and be safe.

S
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Last edited by Stretch; 11 April 2017 at 21:13.
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  #15  
Old 11 April 2017, 22:58
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I was hoping you would post. Thanks RGR M. Stretch, thanks as well.
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Old 11 April 2017, 23:37
Oldpogue Oldpogue is online now
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Originally Posted by 34RX View Post
I have this for use with the table saw. It can be used with the router as well.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/m...em-model-gr200
Don't forget the safety glasses. I have a buddy who lost an eye due to a splinter flying up while using a table saw.
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Old 12 April 2017, 09:09
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In addition to the advice given above, remember your local businesses. I'm not sure about your neck of the woods, but there should be a lumber company near you(retail, not wholesale) which could plane your boards for a nominal fee, or they may even have blanks for various projects already roughed-out.

It would serve you well to visit one of those shops and get friendly with the owner/manager. I grew up working at a lumber yard in Maryland that also ran a retail shop called the World of Hardwoods which sold individual boards. The variety in lumber was incredible, and you can ask the shop which boards are best for what project. Once you establish rapport, they may give you deals, or hold certain boards with the best grain for you. I know because I've done this with our repeat customers.

Regarding wood choice, research which varieties are denser than others, turn better, etc. Purple heart for example as previously mentioned, is a very dense hardwood and hard to work with without the proper tools. I have a nightstick made out of it that a former LEO made for me when I worked there. He always complained about working with it, but said there was nothing better to beat folks with

Here's a link to a lumber retailer near me which gives a few examples of some exotic pieces. The most important thing is to have fun with it, be careful, and always respect your tools. I've known many a man who've lost digits or more in this craft.

https://www[dot]exoticlumber.com/product-category/select-exotic-hardwoods/
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Old 12 April 2017, 12:47
SeanC007 SeanC007 is offline
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If your getting into it for similar sanity reasons I got into it than look at getting a hand planner, a decent set of files, a rasp, a Dremmel kit, a Japanese pull saw, a jig saw, a chisel set, and various sand paper grits. It takes some practice and patience but, the overall feeling while and after completing a project, lifts the heart, for lack of better analogy. I used the Dremmel for a lot of my router work because the router tends to get away from you when doing free hand work without a table. Also, a good pair of leather work gloves so you don't chew up your hands. Overall, you may spend about 200 on hand tools unless prices have drastically changed. I've created tables, movie/ book shelves, chopping boards, a love seat sofa, practice swords, etc... I'm currently working on finishing filling a knife blank than I'm going to put a nice oak or bone handle on it.
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  #19  
Old 13 April 2017, 11:38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan View Post
In addition to the advice given above, remember your local businesses. I'm not sure about your neck of the woods, but there should be a lumber company near you(retail, not wholesale) which could plane your boards for a nominal fee, or they may even have blanks for various projects already roughed-out.

It would serve you well to visit one of those shops and get friendly with the owner/manager. I grew up working at a lumber yard in Maryland that also ran a retail shop called the World of Hardwoods which sold individual boards. The variety in lumber was incredible, and you can ask the shop which boards are best for what project. Once you establish rapport, they may give you deals, or hold certain boards with the best grain for you. I know because I've done this with our repeat customers.

Regarding wood choice, research which varieties are denser than others, turn better, etc. Purple heart for example as previously mentioned, is a very dense hardwood and hard to work with without the proper tools. I have a nightstick made out of it that a former LEO made for me when I worked there. He always complained about working with it, but said there was nothing better to beat folks with

Here's a link to a lumber retailer near me which gives a few examples of some exotic pieces. The most important thing is to have fun with it, be careful, and always respect your tools. I've known many a man who've lost digits or more in this craft.

https://www[dot]exoticlumber.com/product-category/select-exotic-hardwoods/
+100 to this^^

I bought white oak from an Amish sawmill to build a 4 x 4 farmhouse truss table for my oldest daughter. I gave them the BOM I needed in the way of wood, which I could not buy on the regular market. When I asked for 2 x 8 x 8 foot boards, I got 2.25 x 9 x 10 foot boards- they understood that I would have to put the wood in a kiln and plane it to the correct dimension. I also gave them the order at 1000 and picked the order at 1600 that day.
They loaded the lumber with me and since then I've been back and they were more than happy for repeat business.

Oh yeah, I paid $2.35bf for the white oak...
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  #20  
Old 13 April 2017, 15:14
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Sadly, I think I stuck with the usual Lowe's and Home Depot in Sacramento.

Not sure if this is good for cutting boards, but it looks cool:

Bocote.


http://www.woodworkerssource.com/sho...uct/boc44.html
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