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Old 11 September 2019, 12:38
yrot yrot is offline
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Medical Histories

Thought some of you might find this useful, especially those of you having to care for elderly parents.

Many doctors, nurses and some EMTs have told me how helpful the piece of paper I hand them is and wish more people would do this - one asked if he could keep a copy to show others how to do it (patient name & DOB whited out, of course). I carry at least 2 copies each of the medical histories for my dad, brother and myself in my purse and have them put a folded copy of theirs in their billfolds with the label "Meds & Medical History" clearly visible. Any changes to the document since the last doctor visit are printed in red so they don't have to read entire thing each visit. Scripts & OTC used to be listed in alphabetical order until dad's last hospital stay where I discovered it was better to list them in order taken so the nurse didn't accidentally skip a med. Plus questions from the ER nurse about what time of day meds were taken prompted me to include that on the sheet. The sheet also comes in very handy when having to see a new doctor - there's just not enough space on their forms to list all the meds and history for someone who's 95, so I just write in "See attached". Plus it keeps me from having to gather all his meds up and haul them along in a grocery sack every time we go to the doctor (which is often). Also helpful is listing the last 4 A1C's, but there's not enough room on dad's sheet to do that. Below is dad's sheet:

Full Name of Patient, DOB xx/xx/1924
Effective 8/23/19 (8/14/19 A1C = 6.4)

Morning meal meds taken @ 0700, evening meal meds @ 1650, bedtime meds @ 2100

Prescription Medications
1) Insulin Novolin 70/30 (diabetes type 2): 30 units twice daily 30 minutes before morning & evening meals (using between 28 & 32 units depending on what blood sugar reading is)
2) Hydrochlorothiazide 25mg (fluid retention): ½ tablet daily w/ morning meal
3) Lisinopril 20mg (blood pressure): ½ tablet daily w/ morning meal
4) Omeprazole 20mg (acid reflux): 1 tablet daily 30 minutes before evening meal
5) Atorvastatin 40mg (cholesterol): 1 tablet daily @ bedtime
6) Doxazosin Mesylate 8mg (enlarged prostate): ½ tablet daily @ bedtime
7) Finasteride 5mg (urine flow): 1 tablet daily @ bedtime
8) Amiodarone HCL 200mg (persistent ventricular fibrillation) - effec 2/6/19: 1 tablet daily @ bedtime
9) Temazepam 15 mg (sleep): 1 tablet daily @ bedtime - using for only 1-2 weeks when Melatonin becomes ineffective
10) Hydrocodone/ADAP 5/325mg (pain): ½ to 1 tablet as needed (normally takes ½ tablet daily @ bedtime & ½ to 1 tablet following each eye injection)
11) Pegatanib Sodium injection (wet macular degeneration): 1 injection in eye every 5 weeks for each eye

OTC/Non-Prescription
12) Bayer Aspirin 81mg (blood thinner): 1 tablet daily w/ morning meal
13) FeroSul Ferrous Sulfate 324mg (anemia): 1 tablet daily w/ morning meal
14) One-A-Day Men’s 50+ Health Formula (multivitamin): 1 tablet daily w/ morning meal
15) Vitamin C 1000mg - effec 2/6/19: 1 tablet daily w/ morning meal
16) Docusate Sodium 100mg (stool softener): 2 tablets twice daily w/ morning & evening meals
17) Oncovite (antioxidant multivitamin): 1 tablet twice daily w/ morning & evening meals
18) Tylenol Arthritis 650mg: 1 tablet as needed, not to exceed 3/day (taking only 1 tablet w/ morning meal & 1 tablet @ bedtime to keep total Acetaminophen from all meds under 1000mg in any 8 hour period & 2000mg/day)
19) Lutein & Zeaxanthin (eye multivitamin): 1 capsule daily w/ evening meal
20) Melatonin 3mg + L-theanine 200mg (sleep): 1 tablet daily @ bedtime
21) MiraLax (chronic constipation): 1 dose dissolved in 8 oz water daily @ bedtime
22) Vitafusion Fiber Well Sugar Free Gummies 2.5mg (fiber): 2 gummies daily @ bedtime

Vaccinations
1) 05-07-19 - First of 2 Shingrix Shingles vaccinations
2) 10-19-18 - Flu vaccination
3) 08-18-17 - PPSV23 Pneumonia vaccination
4) 02-29-16 - PCV13 Pneumonia vaccination

Surgical & Trauma History
1) 02-28-19 - Electrical Cardioversion (Dr. Xxxx @ Name of hospital)
2) 02-06-19 - Angiogram (Dr. Xxxx @ Name of hospital)
3) 01-23-19 - Overnight CCU observation for AFIB & fluid in lungs (Name of hospital)
4) 02-27-17 - Shingles outbreak
5) 07-06-16 - Cataract Lens Replacement, right eye
6) 11-26-12 - Aortic Valve Replacement & Double Bypass (Dr. Xxxx & Dr . Xxxx @ Name of hospital)
7) 2012 - Colonoscopy & UGI Endoscopy
8) ???? - Cataract Lens Replacement, left eye (sometime between 2005 & 2012)
9) 2004 to present - Wet Macular Degeneration treatment on both eyes (Dr. Xxxx)
10) 12/2000 - Angioplasty & 2 additional Stents (Dr. Xxxx @ Name of hospital)
11) 06/2000 to 2004 - Bladder Cancer surgery & BCG treatment (Dr. Xxxx @ Name of hospital)
12) 1997 - Angioplasty & 1 Stent in extra artery (Dr. Xxxx @ Name of hospital)
13) 1995 - Hearing damage due to loud gun shot
14) 1993 - Macular Degeneration surgery, left eye
15) 1993 - Diabetes Type 2 diagnosis
16) 1977 - Collapsed left lung due to car accident (quit smoking @ this time after 35 years)
17) 1971 - Hemorrhoid surgery
18) 1944 - Hiatal Hernia surgery
19) 1942 - Stitches to left index, middle & ring fingers cut by circular saw
20) 1937 - Pneumonia
21) 1930 - Tonsillectomy
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  #2  
Old 11 September 2019, 19:21
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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That is very good and is very helpful.

Patient often do not take what is prescribed. It is good to know what they actually take and when.

Also list allergies and what the reactions are.

Can't tell you the number of times a list like this has made outcomes much better.
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  #3  
Old 11 September 2019, 21:14
Stretch Stretch is offline
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by yrot View Post
...your post...
That is good information. I’m not yet caring for my getting elderly father, he’s pushing on 77.

After his last stay in the hospital he said he was going to work up a spreadsheet of the medicines he’s taking. Your post reminds me to ask him if he has done that yet. I know enough to know that I would be out of bounds to copy and paste your original post and send it to him.

Thanks for posting,

S
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Old 11 September 2019, 21:44
yrot yrot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
I know enough to know that I would be out of bounds to copy and paste your original post and send it to him.

Thanks for posting,

S
You wouldn't be out of bounds at all - all personal info was stripped so it could be used as a template for anyone here wanting to utilize it. I would also send 8654's post since it contains the allergy suggestion.

This isn't just for the elderly. It's for anyone who's grown tired of filling out doctor forms or having to haul meds in w/ them to doctor visits or tired of trying to recall every little medical detail under stress.

This was done in Word - easy to keep updated and easy to size down to one page. I use the spreadsheet to calculate when I need to re-order scripts and Outlook calendar to remind me.
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Old 11 September 2019, 22:08
Stretch Stretch is offline
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PM inbound.

He will like the word doc.
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  #6  
Old 11 September 2019, 22:26
yrot yrot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
PM inbound.

He will like the word doc.
PM received. As an FNG, I'm only allowed to send 1 PM every hour and didn't keep a copy of my reply. If I didn't say it clearly, what I meant was PM me your email address, and I will forward a copy of the Word template.
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  #7  
Old 11 September 2019, 22:35
yrot yrot is offline
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Email sent. Let me know if you have any problems with the document.
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  #8  
Old 12 September 2019, 10:15
Devildoc Devildoc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8654maine View Post
That is very good and is very helpful.

Patient often do not take what is prescribed. It is good to know what they actually take and when.

Also list allergies and what the reactions are.

Can't tell you the number of times a list like this has made outcomes much better.
A million times, yes....

When I am in triage and they butcher the names, or can't spell them or pronounce them, or forget about that "one little pit that does something to my blood".....

Likewise for allergies....
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Old 12 September 2019, 12:51
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wandering_idiot wandering_idiot is offline
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It's good to see the vitamins and supplements also being listed. It's becoming more common for people to take supplements and there really hasn't been a lot of research into what roles, if any, some of these may play when interacting with current medications or medical problems. The most recent article I read was about a man who was overdosing on vitamin D; his 'doc' (naturopath)had prescribed 6x the lethal limit, IIRC.
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Old 13 September 2019, 11:22
dustyrebel dustyrebel is offline
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I love it when someone hands me one of those pill boxes that has two weeks of meds in it. They expect me to know all of the medications by looking at the pills, or expect me to look up each pill online to identify them.
My suggestion to them is to tape a list of the pill names on the bottom of the box and update it when meds are added or deleted.
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Old 13 September 2019, 13:48
Devildoc Devildoc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyrebel View Post
I love it when someone hands me one of those pill boxes that has two weeks of meds in it. They expect me to know all of the medications by looking at the pills, or expect me to look up each pill online to identify them.
My suggestion to them is to tape a list of the pill names on the bottom of the box and update it when meds are added or deleted.
When I was orienting in the ED, 16 years ago, we were in triage and a patient did that. My preceptor said, "Lady, I ain't no PDR...." and gave it back.
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  #12  
Old 15 September 2019, 16:23
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pavegnr pavegnr is offline
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I keep them all in notepad on my phone. That way I can update it when necessary. I also keep a history of my BP, Pulse, temp and weight for my heart doctor. I got tired of her asking and me coming up with that Hell I don't know expression.
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  #13  
Old 16 September 2019, 15:24
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wildman43 wildman43 is offline
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Thanks that reminds me that my V.A. Doctor needed an up dated list from my private Doctor.
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