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  #21  
Old 11 December 2017, 17:12
Chesie Chesie is offline
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The spongy-syringe thingy is called X-Stat, and it is the ideal field treatment for a very narrow kind of wound. It works great in deep, narrow wound channels, and that is about it. It was never meant to be the panacea first treatment for all penetrating trauma.

The current generation x-stat packaging is pretty cumbersome and not ideal if space in your bag is at a premium. The dude who invented x-stat has some new ideas in compact rolled-gauze that look very promising, but they haven’t reached full product roll-out yet. He is a SOF veteran, and undoubtedly some board members either know him or are him. Or both. Lol.

The current generation Quick-Clot combat gauze does not cause significant tissue damage and has the widest potential uses. If I had to pick one hemoststic to carry in a blow out kit, it would be QCCG. The original QC was problematic to pull out of wounds, from an end-user perspective, when the time of application to removal was over 30m. The chemical cauterization obscured anatomy and made vascular dissections more difficult.

Regards,
Danny

Last edited by Chesie; 11 December 2017 at 17:22.
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  #22  
Old 11 December 2017, 17:46
DirtyDog0311 DirtyDog0311 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesie View Post
The spongy-syringe thingy is called X-Stat, and it is the ideal field treatment for a very narrow kind of wound. It works great in deep, narrow wound channels, and that is about it. It was never meant to be the panacea first treatment for all penetrating trauma.
So gunshot/stab/deep puncture wounds? That was kind of the idea I had in mind. My thinking is that if you're in the city and a bomb goes off or a durka goes all M'hummad Jihad, like they're prone to do from time to time, those wounds would be common and those devices would be more beneficial than say in a farm type environment where crushing/ripping/tearing/cutting wounds would be the norm.

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The current generation Quick-Clot combat gauze does not cause significant tissue damage and has the widest potential uses. If I had to pick one hemoststic to carry in a blow out kit, it would be QCCG. The original QC was problematic to pull out of wounds, from an end-user perspective, when the time of application to removal was over 30m. The chemical cauterization obscured anatomy and made vascular dissections more difficult.
Thanks for the insight Danny. I'll probably have a few gauze QCs for my field/normal use.....but switch to a more urban kit with the QCCG and StaticX when I transition environments. Of course, If I'm in the city I usually drive my POV so I can pack my STOMP kit in the POV and a bit more involved FAK than my field pack -- as I can take out my emergency heater and other bushcraft shit (more space).

To round it back to the OP story, did anyone else catch this fucker came via chain migration? Our immigration policies are fucking insane. This guy, then that other guy who got in via the 'diversity' lotto. Then the goddamn Tsaranev (sp) fucks that got in because they were kids and the bleeding heart shiteaters think third world animal cubs don't grow up into predators ("Oh they're JUST LIKE US™!!!"). http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/12/11...yed-ullah.html

And FFS, that NYC photo on the cover page nearly gave me a goddamn epileptic seizure. For one fucking 5" metal pipe bomb they roll out every damn vehicle in the NY Metro area? GD, me and my friends made worse shit to blow up frogs when I was 12. A bomb that went off right on top of him and he didn't die.
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  #23  
Old 11 December 2017, 17:51
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hawkdrver hawkdrver is online now
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Originally Posted by ET1/ss nuke View Post
So far we have been very fortunate that our enemies have been so incompetent. We can't depend on that to last forever.
Amen.

Just from my narrow part of the spectrum the NVG and IRCM part of that discussion is a very long one.
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  #24  
Old 11 December 2017, 19:09
hile hile is offline
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The commute home this afternoon was surreal as I transited through 42d Street from Grand Central to head to Penn Station. Utterly silent. Not even the musicians, pan handlers, or Salvation Army bell ringers making an appearance. There were maybe 200 people on the downtown platform when normally there are 200 in the first 50 feet.
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  #25  
Old 11 December 2017, 21:11
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MakoZeroSix MakoZeroSix is offline
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If the guy had managed to det himself properly during Santa-Con a few days ago that would have at least been a value add for NYC. Or if he had taken out a bunch of Desnudas. Which I'm imagining aren't around in the winter but you get the idea.
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  #26  
Old 11 December 2017, 21:40
Chesie Chesie is offline
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Originally Posted by DirtyDog0311 View Post
So gunshot/stab/deep puncture wounds?
X-stat needs a hard floor to tamponade bleeding. It is indicated only for junctional bleeding and deep wounds (like the femoral or axillary artery). You can't use it above the inguinal ligament in the groin, or it will just push the blood into the retroperitoneum. Same with chest or abdominal wounds. Those kinds of wounds don't have a deep barrier to contain the bleeding. Especially with chest wounds, packing the wound tightly will prompt tension pneumothorax.

Regards,
Danny
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  #27  
Old 11 December 2017, 21:57
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Not to derail but question for the medics.

I've seen plenty of guys with either kerlix or quik-clot on board, but it has been over the shoulder as we are hauling ass for the CASH or Role 3. Always wondered but never thought to ask the PJs or the ER guys for some reason: I know not to get the quik clot in your eye , how big a pain in the ass is it for the docs to remove that shit once it's in. I've always pictured it working like POR-15 on rust, and assumed they had to excise whatever it touched.
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  #28  
Old 11 December 2017, 23:03
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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Y'all be derailing this thread with medical shit. Start a new thread.
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  #29  
Old 12 December 2017, 09:22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesie View Post
The spongy-syringe thingy is called X-Stat, and it is the ideal field treatment for a very narrow kind of wound. It works great in deep, narrow wound channels, and that is about it. It was never meant to be the panacea first treatment for all penetrating trauma.

The current generation x-stat packaging is pretty cumbersome and not ideal if space in your bag is at a premium. The dude who invented x-stat has some new ideas in compact rolled-gauze that look very promising, but they haven’t reached full product roll-out yet. He is a SOF veteran, and undoubtedly some board members either know him or are him. Or both. Lol.

The current generation Quick-Clot combat gauze does not cause significant tissue damage and has the widest potential uses. If I had to pick one hemoststic to carry in a blow out kit, it would be QCCG. The original QC was problematic to pull out of wounds, from an end-user perspective, when the time of application to removal was over 30m. The chemical cauterization obscured anatomy and made vascular dissections more difficult.

Regards,
Danny
Awesome. Thanks for the details. Yeah, I had heard they had improved on the original QC. I think a lot of us saw the pig video in CLS class for the original QC.

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He is a SOF veteran, and undoubtedly some board members either know him or are him. Or both
Not sure why, but this sentence made me literally LOL.
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