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  #61  
Old 23 July 2013, 15:27
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Johan Johan is offline
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We looked him like he had a dick growing out of his forhead then proceeded to beat him.
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Thank you Matchanu. Of course I cannot precisely explain to the Wife of my Friend and Host what the cause of my laughter is.

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  #62  
Old 28 August 2013, 09:01
pirana pirana is offline
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(Hope this hasn't been posted before)

OK, if I have to play the fucking game, this is the coin for me:

http://www.timelessmilitarycoins.com.../olongapo-city


The other side's depiction of the bridge over shit river is awesome.
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  #63  
Old 28 August 2013, 12:18
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B 2/75 B 2/75 is offline
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Back in the day I had two coins from the S5, one brass one "silver" which I gave to my HS ROTC mentor and rifle team coach, a Korea Rakassan / Manchurian POW and 2 tour in RVN 5th Group guy. I promptly lost my brass one in college.

Over the years I've kept my eyes peeled for an original pre-Regimental 2nd BN coin to no avail, but a month ago I found this sterling silver beauty.

When the WAD changed command, there was a massive cookout on Lewis Lake to mourn his leaving and to welcome LTC Powell. After the water jump, Ranger games (tug o war, etc, began the drinking and gift giving. Bravo Co have him a Colt AR-15 mounted on a CIB wall board. SSG Gullstrand the armorer had "fixed it" nicely. Another company, and for the life of me I don't remember which, had STOLEN his beret a few weeks earlier from his office during BN PT. Anyway, that beret got bronzed, and it, along with two of these very same coins but in 24K gold, were mounted under plexiglass for him.

I'd think that this coin in gold would be pretty damn hard to find. I was amazed to find a serling silver one... just about as rare as mermaids
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File Type: jpg 2-75 BN Sterling Silver Coin small.jpg (43.1 KB, 409 views)
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Last edited by B 2/75; 28 August 2013 at 12:24.
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  #64  
Old 28 August 2013, 13:15
Specboatteam Specboatteam is offline
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Originally Posted by pirana View Post
(Hope this hasn't been posted before)

OK, if I have to play the fucking game, this is the coin for me:

http://www.timelessmilitarycoins.com.../olongapo-city


The other side's depiction of the bridge over shit river is awesome.
Nice coin right there, been there plenty of times and have never seen one of those.
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  #65  
Old 28 August 2013, 19:15
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Originally Posted by B 2/75 View Post
Back in the day I had two coins from the S5, one brass one "silver" which I gave to my HS ROTC mentor and rifle team coach, a Korea Rakassan / Manchurian POW and 2 tour in RVN 5th Group guy. I promptly lost my brass one in college.

Over the years I've kept my eyes peeled for an original pre-Regimental 2nd BN coin to no avail, but a month ago I found this sterling silver beauty.

When the WAD changed command, there was a massive cookout on Lewis Lake to mourn his leaving and to welcome LTC Powell. After the water jump, Ranger games (tug o war, etc, began the drinking and gift giving. Bravo Co have him a Colt AR-15 mounted on a CIB wall board. SSG Gullstrand the armorer had "fixed it" nicely. Another company, and for the life of me I don't remember which, had STOLEN his beret a few weeks earlier from his office during BN PT. Anyway, that beret got bronzed, and it, along with two of these very same coins but in 24K gold, were mounted under plexiglass for him.

I'd think that this coin in gold would be pretty damn hard to find. I was amazed to find a serling silver one... just about as rare as mermaids

Dude! It is amazing and awesome that you found one. Years ago, late 90s, I organized a project and sent my bronze coin, identical to yours above, to one of the mints. They made new dies and struck 50 sterling silver coins for us. They were all pre-sold as part of the project. I'll bet some guys here were part of that. I've got two of them.

Another small world story. A friend of mine was swimming on the beach somewhere in California and found something in the sand. It was a newer pewter 2d Batt coin so he gave it to me. That's the one I carry. The bronze one I sent off for the dies was later stolen in a burglary--my good ones were in the gun safe.
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  #66  
Old 28 August 2013, 19:46
Oldpogue Oldpogue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pirana View Post
(Hope this hasn't been posted before)

OK, if I have to play the fucking game, this is the coin for me:

http://www.timelessmilitarycoins.com.../olongapo-city


The other side's depiction of the bridge over shit river is awesome.
I'd buy one if they made one for Angeles City outside of Clark AFB. I'm just wondering what iconic image they might come up with for Angeles. Maybe the "Dirty Dozen" which was the nickname for bar row in Angeles.
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  #67  
Old 29 August 2013, 06:26
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DSSRonin DSSRonin is offline
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Pretty sure I'll screw this up but here goes..
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  #68  
Old 29 August 2013, 10:17
pirana pirana is offline
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Originally Posted by Oldpogue View Post
I'd buy one if they made one for Angeles City outside of Clark AFB. I'm just wondering what iconic image they might come up with for Angeles. Maybe the "Dirty Dozen" which was the nickname for bar row in Angeles.
Or the "Nepa Hut."
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  #69  
Old 29 August 2013, 10:24
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Front and back of the 2ID LRS Coin. I didn't have a .jpg of the back so I had to borrow a pic of the back from a friend, but it is identical to mine save the serial number. The Coin went through a few changes after my departure. This was circa 1992-1993. Still have mine.
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  #70  
Old 29 August 2013, 10:42
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RGR.Montcalm RGR.Montcalm is offline
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Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
I have one with a date of 7 NOV 77
Here it is- originally pewter but wear tear, ocean water, swamp water, gallons of sweat took their toll-

1-75coin obverse.jpg

1-75coin reverse.jpg
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  #71  
Old 29 August 2013, 17:02
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
Here it is- originally pewter but wear tear, ocean water, swamp water, gallons of sweat took their toll-
The ones I saw looked a lot like that, an actual coin without any colorful enamel "bling".
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  #72  
Old 29 August 2013, 19:09
Oldpogue Oldpogue is offline
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Originally Posted by pirana View Post
Or the "Nepa Hut."
I have an interesting memory about a nipa hut. One of the guys in my outfit had been out with a jeepney girl. They ended up going back to a nipa hut ( A house on stilts because most of the central plains would flood during rainy season). While they were romancing, a trap door opened up and a hand took all of the money out of his wallet. He had prepaid so didn't think to look in his wallet when he left. When he got back to base he discovered he had been ripped off. Three of us got in a 59' Plymouth and drove back to the nipa hut where the robbery had taken place. We waited until they shut down for the night, not wanting a direct confrontation because the jeepney driver was packing and we couldn't. We snuck up to the nipa hut and tied a tow rope around one of the stilts and hooked it up to the back bumper. We peeled out and pulled the whole hut down.
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  #73  
Old 29 August 2013, 19:20
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Mingo Kane Mingo Kane is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RGR.Montcalm View Post
Here it is- originally pewter but wear tear, ocean water, swamp water, gallons of sweat took their toll-

Attachment 25122

Attachment 25123
I have two of the 1st Batt coins that came out after Grenada...the company spelled it wrong "Granada"--and offered to replace all of the spelling error coins if you had one...I kept mine
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  #74  
Old 29 August 2013, 20:27
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ARCHANGELRANGER ARCHANGELRANGER is offline
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Partial to this one. :)

My O5 Command Coin
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  #75  
Old 29 August 2013, 21:04
fireranger fireranger is offline
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Wow! Some of you guys are old!!! Thank you for leading the way! Awesome old Ranger coins! I carry mine in my wallet still. 3rd Bn 94-97. No color bling on it. I heard a guy in my fire dept was a "Ranger" I finly saw him one day, a BS call, walking back to our trucks I snuck it out of my wallet and told him, I heard something about you, he said oh really? I dropped my coin. With out hesitation, he dropped and started pushing on the side of the road and said he hadn't been coined in years. After his 26 push-ups we had a good chat, some same buddies....... You never forget that sound!
RLTW!
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  #76  
Old 15 September 2013, 12:47
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jdogonroad jdogonroad is offline
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Challenge Coin History and Rules

My buddy (Ret. Navy CW4) and I were talking about Challenge coins several months ago, and today he sent this. First time I've ever seen the History of it, but the rules are pretty much as I have learned over the years. I cannot speak to the veracity of it, but has a ring of truth.

Challenge Coin History and Rules of the Coin

The History of the Challenge Coin

During World War I, American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons in Europe. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war. In one squadron, a wealthy lieutenant ordered medallions struck in solid bronze and presented them to his unit. One young pilot placed the medallion in a small leather pouch that he wore about his neck.
Shortly after acquiring the medallions, the pilot's aircraft was severely damaged by ground fire. He was forced to land behind enemy lines and was immediately captured by a German patrol. In order to discourage his escape, the Germans took all of his personal identification except for the small leather pouch around his neck. In the meantime, he was taken to a small French town near the front. Taking advantage of a bombardment that night, he escaped. However, he was without personal identification.
He succeeded in avoiding German patrols by donning civilian attire and reached the front lines. With great difficulty, he crossed no-man's land. Eventually, he stumbled onto a French outpost. Unfortunately, saboteurs had plagued the French in the sector. They sometimes masqueraded as civilians and wore civilian clothes. Not recognizing the young pilot's American accent, the French thought him to be a saboteur and made ready to execute him. He had no identification to prove his allegiance, but he did have his leather pouch containing the medallion. He showed the medallion to his would-be executioners and one of his French captors recognized the squadron insignia on the medallion. They delayed his execution long enough for him to confirm his identity. Instead of shooting him they gave him a bottle of wine.
Back at his squadron, it became tradition to ensure that all members carried their medallion or coin at all times. This was accomplished through challenge in the following manner - a challenger would ask to see the medallion. If the challenged could not produce a medallion, they were required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged them. If the challenged member produced a medallion, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued on throughout the war and for many years after the war while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.
Challenge Coin History Vietnam Era

Leisure time in Vietnam was a commodity, but when it came it was utilized to the max: catching up on sleep, writing letters home, or letting off steam at the hootch bar. The latter proved to be the most popular. But eventually, it too, could become boring and mundane.
To heighten excitement and foster unit esprit de corps, bullet clubs were formed. These were comprised of small, elite front line fighters who each carried a personalized bullet from the weapon they carried in combat. The ultimate use of the bullet, usually carried in a hip pocket, was to deny the enemy personal capture.
When an individual entered the hootch bar he would be challenged by fellow team members to produce his bullet. If he did, the challengers would pay his bar tab for the rest of the evening. If he failed to produce his bullet, he bought drinks for the remainder of the night.
Eventually, personalized bullets took on disbelieving proportions. Some "teamies" took to carrying 20-, 40-, or even 150MM cannon shells. Clearly these were not personalized, coup de grace munitions, but rather manifestations of perceived individual prowess in combat or perhaps on R & R.
At the height of the bullet club's heyday, it was not an uncommon sight to see strewn across a barroom table, a very respectable representation of the full range of bullets, rockets, cannon and artillery shells used in Southeast Asia.
In order to gain control of the situation and to avoid accidental discharge of the large, fully functional munitions, bullets were traded for coins, which reflected the units symbol and pride. A controlled number and/or the individual's name personalized each coin. The rules remained the same, although today they are greatly expanded. Loss of your coin was, and remains, tantamount to eternal disgrace and banishment. To forget your coin, in anticipation of a challenge, results in minor death.
Emerging from those small, elite groups using bullets are today's coin challengers. Known to strike anywhere, at anytime, they insidiously stalk, waiting for the right moment to attack. An innocent bystander may never hear the challenge, only the challengee's despairing cry, "OH I FORGOT MINE!!!"


Challenge Coin Rules

1. Rules of the coin game must be given or explained to all new coin holders.
2. The coin MUST be carried at all times. You can be challenged for it anywhere, at any time. You must produce the coin without taking more than 4 steps to produce it.
3. When challenging, the challenger must state whether it is for a single drink or a round of drinks.
4. Failure to produce a coin, for whatever reason, results in a bought round or single drinks (whatever the challenger stated). This type of transaction could be expensive, so hold onto your coin. Once the offender (coinless challengee) has bought the drink or round, they can't be challenged again.
5. If all that are challenged produce their coins, the challenger loses and must buy the drinks for all respondents. This too can be expensive, so challenge wisely.
6. Under no circumstances can a coin be handed to another in response to a challenge. If a person gives their coin to another, that person can now keep the coin -- it's theirs!!! However, if a person places the coin down and another person picks it up to examine it, that is not considered giving and the examiner is honor-bound to place the coin back where they got it. The examiner can't challenge while they hold another's coin. After negotiating a "reasonable" ransom", the examiner must return the member's coin.
7. If a coin is lost, replacement is up to the individual. A new coin should be acquired at the earliest opportunity -- losing a coin and not replacing it doesn't relieve a member of his or her responsibilities. This is especially true if your fellow CPO's know that you traditionally carry a coin.
8. There are no exceptions to the rules. They apply to clothed or un-clothed. One step and an arms reach are allowed.
9. A Coin is a Coin. They are not belt buckles, key chains or necklaces. Coins worn in a holder around the neck are valid.
10. The coin should be controlled at all times. Giving a coin to just anyone is like opening a fraternity to just anyone. It is an honor to be given a coin, let's keep it that way. A given or awarded coin is of more personal value than a purchased coin.
11. No holes may be drilled in a coin.
12. The above rules apply to anyone who is worthy to be given/awarded a coin, has a purchased coin, or who is known to be a previous coinholder.



Follow at your own risk!

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  #77  
Old 15 September 2013, 13:04
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Justaclerk Justaclerk is offline
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11. No holes may be drilled in a coin.
Probably to keep it from being affixed to one's dog tags.
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  #78  
Old 15 September 2013, 13:06
Paperpusher Paperpusher is offline
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[QUOTE=jdogonroad;1058322486]My buddy (Ret. Navy CW4) and I were talking about Challenge coins several months ago, and today he sent this. First time I've ever seen the History of it, but the rules are pretty much as I have learned over the years. I cannot speak to the veracity of it, but has a ring of truth.
. . .
Challenge Coin History Vietnam Era

Leisure time in Vietnam was a commodity, but when it came it was utilized to the max: catching up on sleep, writing letters home, or letting off steam at the hootch bar. The latter proved to be the most popular. But eventually, it too, could become boring and mundane.
To heighten excitement and foster unit esprit de corps, bullet clubs were formed. These were comprised of small, elite front line fighters who each carried a personalized bullet from the weapon they carried in combat. The ultimate use of the bullet, usually carried in a hip pocket, was to deny the enemy personal capture.
When an individual entered the hootch bar he would be challenged by fellow team members to produce his bullet. If he did, the challengers would pay his bar tab for the rest of the evening. If he failed to produce his bullet, he bought drinks for the remainder of the night.
Eventually, personalized bullets took on disbelieving proportions. Some "teamies" took to carrying 20-, 40-, or even 150MM cannon shells. Clearly these were not personalized, coup de grace munitions, but rather manifestations of perceived individual prowess in combat or perhaps on R & R.
At the height of the bullet club's heyday, it was not an uncommon sight to see strewn across a barroom table, a very respectable representation of the full range of bullets, rockets, cannon and artillery shells used in Southeast Asia.
In order to gain control of the situation and to avoid accidental discharge of the large, fully functional munitions, bullets were traded for coins, which reflected the units symbol and pride. A controlled number and/or the individual's name personalized each coin. The rules remained the same, although today they are greatly expanded. Loss of your coin was, and remains, tantamount to eternal disgrace and banishment. To forget your coin, in anticipation of a challenge, results in minor death.
Emerging from those small, elite groups using bullets are today's coin challengers. Known to strike anywhere, at anytime, they insidiously stalk, waiting for the right moment to attack. An innocent bystander may never hear the challenge, only the challengee's despairing cry, "OH I FORGOT MINE!!!"
. . .

The VN part of this piece doesn't seem to have been written by anyone with military experience. We know what a bullet is and we know what a round is and we know what brass is. The above part seems to use the terms interchangeably, no?
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  #79  
Old 15 September 2013, 13:12
Prester John Prester John is offline
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This coin was produced by a particularly ornery E-6 who was given entirely too much responsibility on the final hook in Iraq... I am partial to it, since one was placed several flag officers hands.
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  #80  
Old 15 September 2013, 13:17
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Lefty Lefty is offline
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Well, I cannot say anything about the history and rules in that narrative, but in my entire short military career and in all the discussions in my team house and every other VN venue I have encountered, this is the very first time in forty plus years I ever heard of something called a 'bullet club' where you carried a round to be presented at a hootch bar. Perhaps the practice was banned and discontinued by the time of my arrival in '70, but I do not recall anyone ever talking about it.
Saw a few guys wearing bullets or cartridges on necklaces, but never heard of the bullet club challenge. Could be I missed it somehow.
Any other VN era vet remember this?
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